Grimm: Last Fight
November 8, 2014 5:30 AM - Season 4, Episode 3 - Subscribe

After Nick has an unsettling vision, he and Hank work on a case that leads them into the world of boxing; Adalind has a mysterious visitor; Monroe & Rosalie work with Reynard's mother to find the antidote for the spell Adalind used on Nick.
posted by oh yeah! (19 comments total)
 
I'm assuming Adalind's escape from the cell is some kind of fake-out by Victor; what kind of inescapable prison has a secret passage escape route? Presumably he's expecting her to confide in her new fellow escapee, or to lead them straight to her contacts in the resistance, but I can't see her falling for that old trick.
posted by oh yeah! at 5:38 AM on November 8, 2014 [4 favorites]


Well, now we all know where Renard gets his talent for intrigue.

This episode did a good job of using the strengths of the show's ensemble nature - everyone else is moving the longer story forward while our protagonist is occupied with his day job.

Although, c'mon, Monroe, Rosalee and Hank; you should know by now that letting Bud the Beaver in on secrets is a bad idea.

And Wu really needs to talk to Nick . . . . but I though it was a nice touch that they didn't do anything clever with that, it just got avoided again while everyone dealt with the murder investigation, 'cause in real life ordinary everyday stuff gets in the way of Big Discussions all the time.

I really have no idea how they're going to resolve The Wu Problem.

Seconding that Adalind's escape is a fake-out, but I think he's just messing with her head as part of a longer strategy of breaking her will.
posted by soundguy99 at 7:05 AM on November 8, 2014 [2 favorites]


I guess that even though Nick can't see Wesen anymore, he must still have the physical enhancements of a Grimm. When he fought the Wesen at the end his kick hurt it and he was able to hold it off long enough for Trouble to recover and jump it. Considering how strong it was supposed to be, I don't think a normal human could have done that.
posted by homunculus at 9:37 AM on November 8, 2014 [2 favorites]




They did explain how he had inflammation in his retina or something which blocked the Grimm cells in his eyes.
posted by Small Dollar at 10:10 AM on November 8, 2014 [2 favorites]


I really have no idea how they're going to resolve The Wu Problem.

I think they should set him up with one of Juliette's friends.
posted by homunculus at 10:30 AM on November 8, 2014 [2 favorites]


I loved the cones discussion! Enough science to make me feel like a smarty and perhaps enough to give his fiancee insight into his condition being a real part of him, yet not enough detail be ridiculous.

And the eye doc scene ties to the idea of innate Grimm abilities.

Still hoping Wu puts most of it together on his own.
posted by Lesser Shrew at 10:31 AM on November 8, 2014 [1 favorite]


The jumpiness of Monroe around Renard's mother was a great subtle way of showing how powerful she is. He's physically big and a blutbaud, and he made it very clear through body language that she was the most dangerous person in the room, and she was moving with slow controlled awareness, like a snake among mice. Very nicely done.
posted by viggorlijah at 3:18 PM on November 8, 2014 [2 favorites]


I suppose it's only a matter of time until Nick's and Renard's mothers clash over custody of the baby.
posted by homunculus at 3:46 PM on November 8, 2014 [1 favorite]


I did really like how the cones thing is actually kind of an explanation for the whole Grimm thing. How cool.

Other than that, I usually hate boxing episodes, but actually kind of enjoyed Trubel in the gym.
posted by jenfullmoon at 9:54 PM on November 8, 2014


I really have no idea how they're going to resolve The Wu Problem.

I wish I had more faith in their commitment to tying up dangling things (as opposed to the never addressed, to my recall, Nick fading in and out of being a corpse last season) since there'd probably be a lot of interesting territory to mine with regards to how normals interact with this subculture going on around them.

Nick is now aware of a world he can't see, as Wu is coming to be. We've seen this sort-of with Juliette's friends but there we had folks fully integrated into society who just stonewalled up to and maybe even past when it worked. What about all the wesen we've seen skirting the rules, a la the carnival - surely they're out there if you know what to dig for, but not necessarily looking for criminal activity. Or just weird subcultures like Bud's family and friends.
posted by phearlez at 9:14 AM on November 10, 2014 [1 favorite]


as opposed to the never addressed, to my recall, Nick fading in and out of being a corpse last season

I dunno, after a quick check through the Grimm wiki (just in case I forgot something), I think that was pretty much resolved. He got injected with an antidote in the second episode (although his recovery process made him appear dead), and then the third episode starts with him getting an extensive physical exam, where he appears more than fine, although he'll get emailed the final report after some bloodwork comes back from the lab. But all that lab test stuff is really just a plot set-up so Juliette will have a legit reason to check Nick's e-mail, so she learns about Nick's mom being alive - I don't think we were ever really meant to be concerned about Nick's health after the third episode, and I don't recall or see in the wiki recaps anywhere else where Nick's zombie-ness comes back.

At any rate, I think they gotta resolve the Wu issue somehow, eventually (although they might very well drag it out the whole season), because it's the same situation as it used to be with Hank, where just by nature of his job and regular contact with Nick he keeps encountering Wesen who are up to no good, and so keeps trying to investigate crimes that don't really make sense from a "normal human" perspective.


normals interact with this subculture going on around them.

Well, I mean, kind of the point of the show is that they don't. This whole Wesen culture/phenomenon is entirely hidden from "normal" humans, except for a very very very rare exception like Juliette. Which is why being a Grimm is kind of a big deal.

Although they could do something fun with having a group of normal humans show up who are like the equivalent of Bigfoot "researchers", only with Wesen. A bunch of regular humans who've complied all these rare rumors of odd beast sightings and encounters and are convinced there's something behind the rumors, even though the "researchers" have never managed to collect any undeniable physical evidence.
posted by soundguy99 at 4:42 PM on November 10, 2014


as opposed to the never addressed, to my recall, Nick fading in and out of being a corpse last season

I dunno, after a quick check through the Grimm wiki (just in case I forgot something)


He did show some side effects in a few later episodes: Post-Traumatic Zombification Disorder
posted by homunculus at 5:15 PM on November 10, 2014 [1 favorite]


Yes, he seemed to be getting super-Grimm powers after getting the zombie antidote, but I'm assuming that when they figure out the cure to Adalind's power-stripping spell it will return him to normal-Grimm-level abilities.
posted by oh yeah! at 5:56 PM on November 10, 2014 [1 favorite]


Good points, homunculus & oh yeah!.
posted by soundguy99 at 6:00 PM on November 10, 2014


Hank had a relatively easy transition into the world of Wesen. I think Wu's will be a good deal messier. He may even arc out darkly. The scooby gang of Grimm is getting a bit too large. I don't think they've done that with a regular in Grimm, as far as I remember.

I thought that the A plot of this episode was particularly subversive. Through it we once again visit the concept of motherhood in a less than idealized/traditional way. Seems to be a series-long thematic touchstone. This time, specifically, it's in the shape of a mother mistreating a son in order to make him "strong" and "give him the will to do what he must." Which sort of loads our subconscious with questions about whether or not it is best that Adiland be reunited with her child given what we know of her character thus far.

The physicality of Renard's mother also throws traditional conceptualizations of "mother" into a wood chipper to some degree. I think the writing on the show has generally been very strong in remaking the image of women on television into more fully realized characters outside of biologically determined/sexual roles. Trubel's newly minted dominance, physically and supernaturally, aids in this as well.

Speaking of, wasn't Wu's unfortunate introduction into the world of Wesen, by that I mean specifically the arc within which he is struggling, brought about by a Grandmother-esque character? I could be remembering that wrong.
posted by SinisterPurpose at 6:30 PM on November 10, 2014


Yeah, that Aswang was the mother-in-law of a childhood friend.
posted by Small Dollar at 6:46 PM on November 10, 2014


This whole Wesen culture/phenomenon is entirely hidden from "normal" humans, except for a very very very rare exception like Juliette.

Or the Carnival. Or just shenanigans, which Monroe and Rosalie acknowledge happens and which their enforcement body has a protocol to deal with - which indicates it happens/happened enough to merit a process. And not everyone is all that tickled with turning folks into them, so I could imagine a clan of folk skirting the law. *shrug*

Who do we think the FBI folks trying to recruit Trubel are with? The Royals? Resistance? That agent seemed entirely unaware of what the headless jackass was up to, but entirely possible that the Royals keep them in cells for their own management purposes. Pretty sure we established the Resistance does try to keep a cell sort of structure.
posted by phearlez at 10:12 AM on November 11, 2014


Yeah, I see what you're saying, phearlez, re: Wesen culture bleeding into or intersecting with normal human culture.

Who do we think the FBI folks trying to recruit Trubel are with?

Speaking of Wesen/human interaction, how about the idea that it's actually some kind of secret FBI or other government agency's task force created to deal with any Wesen problems, with both Wesen and human agents? Which would explain why they're hot to recruit a young inexperienced Grimm, so they can mold her. Agent Chavez sure seemed to be hinting that Trubel would basically be able to kick Wesen ass for a good cause and without fear of repercussion.
posted by soundguy99 at 3:18 PM on November 11, 2014 [1 favorite]


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