Dead to Me: Full Season
May 6, 2019 7:06 AM - Season 1 (Full Season) - Subscribe

Jen's husband was recently killed by a hit-and-run driver. As she tries to recover, she meets Judy, who also recently suffered a loss. But there's more to Judy (and to Jen (and to her husband (and to pretty much everyone and everything else))) than meets the eye.

Described as a "trauma-dy", the half-hour episode length belies wrenching ( if uneven) emotions at the core of the series -- emotions that drove star Christina Applegate into therapy after filming.

Dead to Me is available via Netflix in the US.
posted by Etrigan (22 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite
 
Linda Cardellini is amazing in this. The rest of it ...

It has a lot of good moments. It says (or at least tries to say) some interesting, thoughtful things about grief and guilt and friendship/family. It starts out strong but begins to flounder as it goes along, but at 10 ~30 minute episodes, it's short enough that it doesn't overstay its welcome.

But I feel like some plot points were brought up and then dropped and I don't think it completely hung together in the way it could have. I would've liked the inconclusive ending more had it not felt so much like "well, we may get a season 2."

I am glad I watched it. I'm not really sure if I'd recommend it, though.
posted by darksong at 9:04 AM on May 6


I agree about the ending. And about Linda Cardellini. I could just watch her mouth the entire time - she's so expressive!!

I sometimes have a hard time with series with trauma at the root of them, like Kimmie Schmidt. But I got into this one, and I think a lot of that is the way characters care for each other.

Also, hi, Ed Asner is wonderful.
posted by wellred at 9:56 AM on May 6 [1 favorite]


Oh no, I should never have read Ed Asner's Wikipedia page.
posted by wellred at 1:14 PM on May 6 [3 favorites]


I had an epic hangover on Saturday and this was the perfect distraction.
posted by lyssabee at 6:57 PM on May 6 [1 favorite]


For some reason I thought it was going to be lighter than it actually was. I liked it, but it was a bit more depressing than I had expected going into it.
posted by Literaryhero at 7:56 PM on May 6


Oh no, I should never have read Ed Asner's Wikipedia page.

I assume this refers to his HIV denialism and his 9/11 truther status, to save anyone else the need of reading his Wikipedia page. Which, wow.
posted by Literaryhero at 8:01 PM on May 6 [7 favorites]


It never ceases to bring me joy seeing Christina Applegate on the screen.
posted by grumpybear69 at 7:40 AM on May 8 [11 favorites]


I loved this. Tight script. Very interesting tonal balance. Great performances.
posted by crossoverman at 9:37 AM on May 9 [4 favorites]


I liked this! I'm a big sucker for messy female characters and friendships. Definite Big Little Lies vibes.
posted by likeatoaster at 5:57 PM on May 10 [4 favorites]


This was like a darker Bad Girls, which was a good thing! But I’m happy to stop with one season, I feel like the story is over. Of course Netflix tends to feel differently (looking at you, The OA).
posted by rikschell at 8:13 PM on May 10 [1 favorite]


It never ceases to bring me joy seeing Christina Applegate on the screen.

Then you should watch her guest appearance on Storybots! (S2e2) it's quite funny, even after watching it a million times with Little Purr.
posted by Hermeowne Grangepurr at 8:14 AM on May 13


This was great. I know the uneven tone is a turn-off to some, but I thought it absolutely worked. Life (and especially grief) is uneven, and it was great to see it brought to the screen so expertly. I've loved Cardellini and Applegate since the Married With Children and Freaks and Geeks days, and it is so great to see them have such long and successful careers. Applegate in particular, I think, is an absolute master at communicating emotion. I feel everything that she is feeling. The silent rage she has while Judy is confessing to her was legitimately scary.

I noticed that when Judy went to show Jen a photo of Steve that we never got a good look at it ourselves, which I thought was strange, but it didn't occur to me until James Marsden opened the door that it was because we would recognize him.
posted by Rock Steady at 9:10 AM on May 21 [1 favorite]


I noticed that when Judy went to show Jen a photo of Steve that we never got a good look at it ourselves, which I thought was strange, but it didn't occur to me until James Marsden opened the door that it was because we would recognize him.

For that matter, did we ever get a good look at Ted?
posted by Etrigan at 9:45 AM on May 21 [1 favorite]


I liked this a lot, thought the ending would be Steve getting killed in a hit-and-run by the Chevy Asshole, but we did get a setup for season two.
posted by sageleaf at 6:46 AM on May 22


Yeah, and I can only assume that's going to involve Jen and Judy bonding over hiding Steve's body and pretending that never happened. I mean if Jen calls the cops and says "he attacked me, and I shot him in self-defense," then there really isn't much of a story left to tell.

But if Jen can't face that (and there are some suspicious circumstances, like asking the neighbor to teach her how to use the gun, not to mention motive because he cost her a LOT on the real estate deal) and decides to hide the body, then Jen is basically a criminal too. She'd be mirroring Judy, who wouldn't have committed a crime if she'd resisted Steve and just stopped and called the cops. Plus, letting the authorities think Steve is a fugitive out there somewhere hiding from the law apparently immunizes Judy from arrest for Ted's hit-and-run because they seem to want her as a witness.If Steve's dead, that no longer applies.

So I don't see how they can go any other way, but they did get me with Steve's death, so who knows?

Mods, this is actually awfully spoilery. Is that okay deep in a thread about a show thats now been out in its entirety for a while? Or should this be redacted?
posted by Naberius at 4:59 AM on May 31


Mods, this is actually awfully spoilery. Is that okay deep in a thread about a show thats now been out in its entirety for a while? Or should this be redacted?

The show is five hours long and has been available in its entirety for four weeks. I think it's spoilt.
posted by Etrigan at 6:52 AM on May 31


Yeah, and I can only assume that's going to involve Jen and Judy bonding over hiding Steve's body and pretending that never happened. I mean if Jen calls the cops and says "he attacked me, and I shot him in self-defence," then there really isn't much of a story left to tell.

There was a remark somewhere, by either one of the detectives, about it being the "run" element of a hit and run that is the crime. I'm not sure how that pans out, from a legal point of view, where there is more than one person in an H&R car - but morally it does seem on the money. Jen's neighbour is involved in some dialogue about there being a right to shoot people after you have told them to get off your property - and we see she has installed some elaborate security equipment around her pool with, presumably cameras to record everything that happens there. So - I think the story is designed to be self contained for one series only, if you allow viewers to make their own conclusions.
posted by rongorongo at 12:25 AM on June 3


"Ow!"
"I'm sorry."
"It's okay."

It was creepy how often Judy and Steve had that exchange.
posted by soelo at 7:52 AM on June 3 [4 favorites]




On the one hand, Applegate and Cardellini have amazing chemistry, and I'd love to continue watching a show about their snarky shenanigans in Malibu (I'm thinking more Cougar Town than Bad Girls Club). And the twists were pretty good in their bingeable way, but I'm just so uncomfortable with the "white-woman-accidental-murderer-coverup trope" that seems to be increasingly common. I also haven't watched the 2nd season of Search Party because I was so upset with the ending of the first season. I know grief, guilt, and cat & mouse are the central tropes of this show, but it's more nerve-wracking than escapism for me, even if the individual scenes were great.

Also, why wouldn't the FBI/detective's office put Judy in protective custody? Even if they weren't going to charge her, it seems like she would be a flight risk or at risk of witness tampering. I know that wouldn't have worked in the narrative, but it bothered me that she was just running around, closing down accounts unilaterally.
posted by Hermeowne Grangepurr at 7:33 AM on June 10


The detective did not seem to believe her much at first and maybe not at all until she opened the storage unit.
posted by soelo at 1:34 PM on June 10


We wrapped up watching the show last night, and really enjoyed it. The twists were largely unexpected, and manner in which they were revealed via ever-expanding flashbacks, were a nice touch. For me, the only real stumbles were both Ted's mom and Jen's eldest son. They were pretty much just dicks who didn't serve the story very well other than to be difficult.

It seemed a bit hard to believe, though, that Judy and Steve would have overlooked the puddle of oil in the storage unit and not cleaned it up.

Also...given the prices!!! for Judy's paintings the gallery worker quoted, we are to assume that her art is part of the money laundering operation, yes?

We're definitely looking forward to another season.
posted by Thorzdad at 5:59 AM on August 4


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