Game of Thrones: The Wolf and the Lion   First Watch 
February 13, 2015 9:02 AM - Season 1, Episode 5 - Subscribe

Robert orders a preemptive strike on the Targaryens; Tyrion helps Catelyn; Sansa is charmed by Ser Loras Tyrell; Arya overhears a plot against her father.

Longer Summary
The events of this episode primarily deal with Ned's investigations into the death of the previous Hand, Jon Arryn. In King's Landing, the Tourney comes to an end while the various factions that plot for power are revealed. However, that delicate balance is undone when news arrives that Tyrion Lannister has been arrested by Catelyn Stark. A meeting of the small council is held, where it is revealed that Daenerys Targaryen is pregnant. If she has a son, he will have a claim to the throne. The King wants an assassin sent to kill the Targaryens. Ned argues that would be dishonorable. The other council members disagree. The King and Ned argue. Ned resigns as Hand and orders his household to prepare to return to Winterfell.

Introduced in this Episode
Location:
* The Eyrie, Above The Vale

Characters:
* Lady of the Eyrie Lysa Arryn, Former Hand of the King Lord Jon Arryn's widow and Lady Catelyn Stark's sister.
* Robin Arryn, eight-year old son of Lady Lysa and the late Lord Jon Arryn
* Knight of the Vale Ser Vardis Egen
* Ser Loras Tyrell, "The Knight of Flowers."

Notes
* Episode received a 2011 Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Stunt Coordination.
posted by zarq (10 comments total)
 
This is a First Watch with Books thread.

Please do not reveal spoilers for subsequent episodes from any source.

Thank you.
posted by zarq at 9:04 AM on February 13, 2015


I've never understood the idea that Danerys' son could be a threat to the throne in any way in which Viserys wasn't, and we never see any evidence that Robert tried to have Viserys killed. So Robert's very worried about the possible future birth of somebody who would be behind a currently-living person in the line of succession? In a line of succession that is no longer valid since he terminated it and started a new one? His worry makes no sense to me.
posted by Pope Guilty at 5:07 PM on February 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


But Viserys was never a threat because Viserys never had a horde of Dothraki with which to potentially take back the Iron Throne.
posted by fancyoats at 8:02 AM on February 14, 2015


Well he thought he terminated that line of succession, but the survival of Dany and Viserys is proof that he didn't.
posted by tofu_crouton at 9:47 AM on February 14, 2015


I've been thinking about all the turning points in this story. The biggest one in this early stage of the story, Catelyn Stark's capture of Tyrion Lannister ranks pretty high as changing this world. Worse, it comes across as a rash move, because Cat is not dim and recognizes the cunning in Tyrion. She should be able to see that it would be beyond stupid to place a well-known blade into the hand of an otherwise anonymous assassin, and instead see it as a crude attempt to shift the blame, should the assassin be captured.
posted by filthy light thief at 7:56 AM on February 18, 2015 [1 favorite]


Does she recognize the cunning in Tyrion? I get the impression that he's stereotyped pretty heavily for being a dwarf.
posted by tofu_crouton at 9:35 AM on February 18, 2015 [1 favorite]


The Starks in general don't seem to understand deception the way they do in King's Landing. I don't think any of them even considered that the knife might be a plant to put suspicion on Tyrion because it is such a dishonorable action.
posted by InfidelZombie at 10:50 AM on February 18, 2015


> Does she recognize the cunning in Tyrion? I get the impression that he's stereotyped pretty heavily for being a dwarf.

> The Starks in general don't seem to understand deception the way they do in King's Landing.

True and true. It seems Cat is under the impression he is more of a jester than serious plotter, and it is sad how few people see deeper into the actions of the Lannisters, Littlefinger, and other schemers. It makes me think of Daes Dae'mar, or "The Game of Houses" in the Wheel of Time series, where some cities are embroiled in plots, sub-plots and counter-plots, while others less deceptive. Also, I've been watching a lot of murder mysteries and police procedurals as of late, so I'm more inclined to watch shows with a skeptical eye for undercurrents and "hidden" plots.
posted by filthy light thief at 11:19 AM on February 20, 2015


Inside the Episode #5 - on Catelyn bringing Tyrion to the Eyrie; the surface Game of Thrones being fought on battlefields with physical violence, while the equally important background game is one of schemes with the likes of Varys and Littlefinger, noting that the latter is "dangerously charming, but mainly dangerously dangerous."
posted by filthy light thief at 11:38 AM on February 20, 2015


It seems Cat is under the impression he is more of a jester than serious plotter

It feels to me that this is something that Tyrion himself cultivates to an extent. It's useful to him to be seen as the Imp, as it allows him to hide his intellect and observe things without being much observed himself.

But it's not particularly Tyrion's cunning that makes Cat's capture of him a bad tactical move: it's more that it's an affront to the Lannister's honor.
posted by We had a deal, Kyle at 12:51 PM on March 6, 2015


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