Twin Peaks: The Return, Parts 1 & 2   First Watch 
May 21, 2017 8:42 PM - Season 3, Episode 1 - Subscribe

The stars turn and a time presents itself. (description from Showtime)

Twin Peaks returns from more than 25 years in the waiting room. Previously, previously, previously, previously, and previously.
posted by duffell (108 comments total) 15 users marked this as a favorite
 
That was incredible.
posted by codacorolla at 8:49 PM on May 21, 2017 [7 favorites]


I baked a cherry pie. I am up for wherever this is going.
posted by dnash at 8:50 PM on May 21, 2017 [1 favorite]


Random observations:

The Log Lady's message to Hawk that the missing thing has something to do with his heritage, may point to the whole "Shadow Self" (a.k.a. doppelgänger) mythology.

Looking back at that Roadhouse scene, I don't believe James and Shelley ever had dialogue together in the original Twin Peaks.

Well, that whole thing in New York was pretty fucking weird. (Part of Project Bluebook, perhaps?)

Matthew Lillard is in this. Skeet Ulrich is in Riverdale. Mädchen Amick is in both. The spirit of the '90s is alive in 2017.
posted by duffell at 8:59 PM on May 21, 2017 [4 favorites]


I also baked a cherry pie. Like Kyle MacLachlan, I do not like cherry pie. But it was necessary. There are four episodes online (I watched three. The fourth will be watched after work as my birthday present to myself.) so are the releasing the fifth episode next week? I'm not sure how that works.
posted by Ruki at 9:15 PM on May 21, 2017


boy that first conversation between box boy and Tracey had that Twin Peaks feeling all over it. the stiltedness is endlessly fascinating. like you know how Stanley Kubrick likes to direct his actors as if they are puppets? Which I love. but David Lynch likes to direct his actors to direct themselves as if they are their own puppets. it is a subtle distinction and a strange one.

- nothing like looking at the scariest box in the world and thinking "somebody for sure is going to be inside that box and somebody is going to be unhappy about it" but not knowing who. I guessed it would be Trac(e)y but I was mistaken. guess I failed to think outside the box.

- this did not need to be as disgusting as it was, it was plenty terrifying without it. but I appreciate the total lack of surprise scares. like we are all Daria, being told well in advance that we are going to get murdered, and having nothing to do but wait for it.
posted by queenofbithynia at 9:16 PM on May 21, 2017 [5 favorites]


I'm having a hard time thinking about where to start, but here's one place, I love Evil Coop's all purpose spy gadget.
posted by codacorolla at 9:17 PM on May 21, 2017 [5 favorites]


Ruki, Episodes 3 and 4 were released immediately but I think we have to wait a few weeks for when Episode 5 airs live.

Duffell, you forgot Balthazar Getty.

Bob is definitely inside Matthew Lillard's character, right? Can Bob be in more than one place at the same time?

I know he's supposed to be a bad guy, and that wig was terrible, but the Black Lodge/doppelgänger version of Agent Coop looked FUCKING COOL. My friend pointed out he has the same hairstyle as Bob. Also, the creepy black eyes.

The glass box project in NYC is weird as hell. There was also mention of Maj. Briggs — I can't wait to see him. I was so happy to see the lovely Log Lady and also Grace Zibriskie.
posted by Brittanie at 9:22 PM on May 21, 2017 [3 favorites]


Me: I dunno, man....

Lynch: CLOUD COMPUTING, SEX, AND OLD PEOPLE ARE BAD.

Me: I could not possibly be more into this.

But no seriously. As someone who loved the first season of Twin Peaks and bounced way hard off the second and never really bothered with FWWM.... Holy shit this was a great start.
posted by sparkletone at 9:25 PM on May 21, 2017 [3 favorites]


I mean the first two seasons, what it does to you, you watch a few episodes in and you start to get the shakes every time there is a scene with a man and a woman alone in a room together. any man and any woman. Even Harry Truman! the tension is unbearable. You can't get PTSD from a television show, not even that one, but I mean the absolute fear it was able to produce when a man started walking towards a woman was just unreal. whatever you think about Bob, the idea that this infection could be in anybody, but really, any man, whether you read it as metaphorical or literal it was just the most pure terror I have ever seen evoked in all the nonviolent scenes, ignoring the violent ones. it was breathtaking, and why I cannot be in sympathy with anybody who only likes Twin Peaks for the jokes and the kitsch factor they read into it. it was frightful.

they are not doing that again, exactly, because they can't. and I personally think they shouldn't. but the fear lingers and it is interesting.
posted by queenofbithynia at 9:25 PM on May 21, 2017 [10 favorites]


Also, when Old Coop was in the Black Lodge/Red Room, the button on his lapel kept switching from black to white. And I can't decide how I feel about their way of working around Michael Anderson's absence.
posted by Brittanie at 9:25 PM on May 21, 2017


One neat detail about Coop Bob is that he's wearing a snakeskin shirt and leather everything else. He's literally walking around in the skin of other creatures!

Also... I knew it was probably coming given the end of S2, but seeing Dale Cooper be alternately evil and ineffectual is really a gut punch in the modern world.
posted by codacorolla at 9:36 PM on May 21, 2017 [9 favorites]


Oh, I'm not sure if this has been mentioned yet but: If you're watching via Amazon Prime, the closed caption for the backwards dialogue in the Black Lodge is "[oddly reverberating]" which is just perfect.
posted by sparkletone at 9:43 PM on May 21, 2017 [1 favorite]


I watched one and a half episodes. And then my roommate came home and we hung out. I've lived with this story for my whole adult life. No need to hurry.

Also, sparkletone, you probably want to watch FWWM.

Also, if I'm not mistaken, Doc's trailer is on Middle Fork Road, just off 468th. In my head cannon the Black Lodge is somewhere past the other end of Middle Fork Road.
posted by wotsac at 9:55 PM on May 21, 2017 [2 favorites]


I have not seen any of Twin Peaks since it first came out. I liked it. I thought I remembered enough to jump right in. I was wrong. So confused. I remember nothing.
posted by weretable and the undead chairs at 10:10 PM on May 21, 2017 [1 favorite]


Evil Mr. C is wayyyy more watchable than Good Dale. It's possible that Messrs. Frost and Lynch are trying to say something about Boomers with this dichotomy.
posted by infinitewindow at 11:07 PM on May 21, 2017


Bob is definitely inside Matthew Lillard's character, right? Can Bob be in more than one place at the same time?

That was my first thought, but I think he was possessed by that Malleus Malleficarum-looking imp a few cells down. I think that imp's the creature DoppelCooper is looking for, the silhouette on his Ace that will free him from the pull of the Black Lodge. The way its head floated off paralleled Ruth Davenport's decapitation.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 11:24 PM on May 21, 2017 [6 favorites]


Forgot to add -- I am so, so happy to see (Deputy Chief!) Hawk again. I'll be really sad if he doesn't make it through the show in one piece.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 11:27 PM on May 21, 2017 [2 favorites]


THAT JAILHOUSE THING FUCKING TERRIFIED ME
posted by roger ackroyd at 1:01 AM on May 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


Both episodes were terrific. The second episode was about what I expected, but the first episode floored me with how good it was. It was barely about Twin Peaks and its established mythology: it was mostly all-material set in New York and South Dakota with only occasional (hilarious) cutaways to known characters. (Jerry Horne was my favorite.)

I expected a lot more Red Room fanservice (which we got in episode 2, admittedly), but the first episode was more like a new Lost Highway or Mulholland Drive. That was a great idea. It really upped the intrigue.

It's incredible how Lynch is able to film horror while bucking so many horror conventions. I'm used to being able to predict when a jump scare will come, or when a statue will suddenly turn toward the camera, or when a person will move from the foreground to reveal something scary in the background... but everything Lynch does is surprising. He really calls attention to how tropey most horror cinema is.
posted by painquale at 3:45 AM on May 22, 2017 [7 favorites]


So pretty. I've never watched the original series in HD, so I don't know if modern technology is able to make it shine the same way, but I found the forest around Dr. Jacoby's home just absolutely breathtaking. The way Lynch lingered on that wide shot as Jacoby's deliveries were being unpacked didn't seem to serve any particular narrative purpose, but an aesthetic one? Oh, yes.

The people, too. There's a reason, I think, that the casting director gets a big credit right up front. All of the actors seem so engaged. You can often see the mechanics of a person thinking in a scene, weighing thoughts, processing a thousand words before awkwardly getting out a dozen that do the job but reveal as little as possible. Lynch, obviously, is responsible for that to some degree as director, too. In lesser hands, this would seem affected, but here it's quite the opposite. The people seem to be just the visible pieces of a much larger and fully realized world.

DoppelCoop is great. He implies that he's imitating human behavior, but what makes him interesting is that he's not just some evil spirit playing Cooper; he does Cooper things. DoppelCoop reads Darya just as Agent Cooper could. He looks like a roadie for Slayer -- he looks like Randall Flagg from The Stand! -- but he talks like Cooper, minus the whimsy. (Or mostly minus the whimsy; from DoppelCoop's POV, what he's saying may be whimsical indeed.) And, of course, he's a hell of a shot. Is he using Cooper's lapel pin to hold up his hair in the back?
posted by kittens for breakfast at 4:22 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


ETA: DoppelCoop playing the conversation back to Darya also seemed like an evil echo of Cooper and his handheld tape recorder.
posted by kittens for breakfast at 4:24 AM on May 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


I halfway expected him to say, "Thanks, Diane," as he switched it off.
posted by painquale at 4:32 AM on May 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


Well, that totally delivered.

For all of the very David Lynch stuff going on, what was most Twin Peaks to me was the stilted melodrama in the prison cell between Bill and his wife.
posted by dfan at 5:00 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


The arm tree and the decapitated body were Lynch's paintings come to life.
posted by armacy at 5:30 AM on May 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


There was also mention of Maj. Briggs — I can't wait to see him.

Agreed, but sadly Don Davis died in 2008.

I'm interested in Bobby Briggs though. It doesn't look like he's yet living a life of deep harmony and joy.
posted by paper chromatographologist at 5:37 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


Bob is definitely inside Matthew Lillard's character, right?

I thought so, but it also looks like his wife may have framed him with the lawyer. ...and then BOB framed the lawyer for her death.
posted by leotrotsky at 5:46 AM on May 22, 2017


I'm especially curious about all these three digit numbers being mentioned each episode.

I hope they're not for an ARG or clues for the audience to follow outside the show through other media. They feel like they're for that sort of thing, but that's played out at this point, so I hope that Twin Peaks doesn't go down that path.
posted by painquale at 6:04 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


Questions:

1. Was the 'bad' arm tree that appeared after 'something is wrong' trying to kill Coop with his 'nonexistence' shout?

2a. How is the box tied to the black lodge (it appears to be, because that's where Coop ended up after getting booted from the lodge)?
2b .What was the face-eating thing in it? A spirit like BOB?

3a. Since Don Davis AND Margaret Lanterman are dead, is there anyone left to represent the White Lodge?
3b. Does the White Lodge still even exist, or is it just a place of the past?
posted by leotrotsky at 6:06 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


One neat detail about Coop Bob is that he's wearing a snakeskin shirt and leather everything else. He's literally walking around in the skin of other creatures!

I just wonder whether Coop's going to get his lovely pale skin tone back after years of BOB's sun damage. Bad Coop is seriously tan.
posted by leotrotsky at 6:12 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


DoppelCoop
I'm torn between which nickname I like more: "Booper" or "Doop".

"Booper" largely cracks me up.

hi wow that was fantastic
posted by rorgy at 6:15 AM on May 22, 2017 [3 favorites]


Matthew Lillard is in this. Skeet Ulrich is in Riverdale. Mädchen Amick is in both. The spirit of the '90s is alive in 2017.

Duffell, you forgot Balthazar Getty.


...and Ashley Judd, David Duchovny, Eddie Vedder, Trent Rezor, Alicia Witt (who was tiny Alia Atreides!), etc...

Makes sense as lots of '90s grunge music videos are pale knockoffs of Lynch imagery.
posted by leotrotsky at 6:17 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


Sequencing-wise, I'm so, so glad that they ended the two-parter on that scene at the Roadhouse, and not just because Chromatics fits fantastically well into a modernized Twin Peaks. (I don't know Chromatics well at all, but damn, they do.)

I like it because, so far, the returning characters from the original largely continue the theme that the adult characters seemed to have on the original—namely, that being older and wiser doesn't stop you from suffering the same basic human sufferings that you dealt with when you were younger. You may have more power, and thus more of a chance to do tremendous good or catastrophic harm, but you're still dealing with the same old shit, for better or for worse.

If the returning cast serve largely as tonal vignettes showing how people are still carrying their baggage from twenty-five years ago, I would not mind in the least. Certainly that's how Sarah Palmer seemed to me—maybe she'd have wound up chain-smoking on that couch were it not for the events of 25 years ago, but it feels in part like this is where she's wound up after decades of recovering from a severe tragedy. Ben and Jerry Horne felt like a similar continuance, minus the tragedy (and maybe plus Ben's trying to be a slightly better person? slightly?), and Jacoby is... sure still Jacoby!

But there was something bittersweet about seeing James and Shelley at the bar. Sweet, mostly, for Shelley, who seems to be in a stable, healthy place, relative to where she was in 1989; bitter for James, who still seems a little bit unable to handle some basic things in life. (That always came up in the Lynch-directed episodes of James, and in the movies too. Other directors, even the good ones, wound up making him seem so flat.) Nothing overtly tragic, but nothing overtly thematic, either: just two people who've lived twenty-five years, and who've changed a lot in some ways and not at all in others.

So much of this was so good. I don't even know where to begin. (Except for here, I guess.)
posted by rorgy at 6:30 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


The first four episodes showed up on Showtime streaming services last night (I have the Showtime Amazon add-on)...I was really tired at 9:00 when they popped up there, and I told myself I was only going to watch the first episode before bed. Cut to two hours later, I had to talk myself down from moving right into episode 3 so I wouldn't be up until midnight, or worse yet 1:00 am if (when) I ended up barreling through the whole thing.

Did the New York "glass box" thing seem like a comment on how people watch TV shows? The watcher's station is set up like a living room, and whenever he's distracted important stuff happens inside the box: Cooper lands on it and floats in while the guy is outside looking for the security guard, and as soon as the couple's naked make-out sesh starts on the couch, something REALLY important happens in the box...and then it comes out and kills them. I feel like Lynch is saying, "This show is the most important thing happening in your living room right now, don't get distracted, pay attention OR ELSE."
posted by doctornecessiter at 6:40 AM on May 22, 2017 [11 favorites]


The watcher's station is set up like a living room, and whenever he's distracted important stuff happens inside the box: Cooper lands on it and floats in while the guy is outside looking for the security guard, and as soon as the couple's naked make-out sesh starts on the couch, something REALLY important happens in the box...and then it comes out and kills them.

Maybe the purpose of having someone watch the box is to prevent something from showing up? Like nothing will appear until you take your eyes off of it?
posted by leotrotsky at 7:05 AM on May 22, 2017 [15 favorites]


stolen from reddit:

"Hey, Laura, if your hand is bigger than your face then you have HOLY SHIT WHAT THE FUCK?!"
posted by leotrotsky at 7:26 AM on May 22, 2017 [6 favorites]


I thought so, but it also looks like his wife may have framed him with the lawyer. ...and then BOB framed the lawyer for her death.

Particularly given that both the wife and the dead lady had the same Coop-accurate bullet hole through their eye.
posted by leotrotsky at 7:27 AM on May 22, 2017 [3 favorites]


A question I just remembered: Did James' motorcycle accident happen in season 2? My vague memory is that he had a lame solo storyline for part of the season, then he was just kind of gone for part of it through the end...Did the accident that they mention happen between then and now, or did it happen in season 2 and I'm just forgetting?
posted by doctornecessiter at 7:27 AM on May 22, 2017


A question I just remembered: Did James' motorcycle accident happen in season 2?

It doesn't happen during Season 2 (that we know of), but may have happened after he left Twin Peaks on his motorcycle to see the rest of America, following the whole Evelyn Marsh debacle.

edit: Removed possible spoiler
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:57 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


I've also watched through at this point, but I can't see a good way to start new discussion threads without trashing the fresh weekly discussion or throwing off the first/second watch structure. A season thread maybe? Just keep in mind that if you post there, then discussion is up to whatever is on streaming?
posted by codacorolla at 7:59 AM on May 22, 2017


I'm fine with going episodically, with a warning to the live-only viewers about the unaired episodes (3 + 4) that are currently available to binge on streaming. After next week, everything will be in sync between the two.
posted by Strange Interlude at 8:06 AM on May 22, 2017


(I would say can we please not with the episode 3&4 talk here. Someone could start a new thread for them.)

I think I only had one negative reaction - that was when the box watching guy starts making out with the woman, and that's the moment something breaks through the box and apparently kills them. Like, really? We're going back to the 80s horror B-movie thing where the kids who try to have sex are always the first to get axe murdered? Also, noting the time shifting that Cooper enters the box it's before the couple have entered and sat down... Is Cooper then the thing that comes through to attack them?
posted by dnash at 8:13 AM on May 22, 2017


The way the scene is staged/edited, it looks like Cooper's brief time in the box coincides with the guy and girl wondering where the guard went. By the time they go back into the secure room together, he's already gotten dragged away by the "non-existence" force. I think the thing that killed them is some other entity that has not been accounted for in the show's interdimensional cosmology yet.
posted by Strange Interlude at 8:37 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


DoppelCoop
Coop Bob
Evil Mr. C


Special Agent Dale Wiseau.
posted by paper chromatographologist at 9:52 AM on May 22, 2017 [11 favorites]


Wow, that NY/Glass Box/secure location is as Lynchian as anything Lynch has done; the analogue-looking hardware and the ambient sound design. Hmm, noticing lots of circles and circle-motifs throughout.

Old Jerry and Old Ben are straight line projections from the original characters and I love it! Not surprised at all that Jerry really got into the legal Cannabis field in rural WA.

DoppelCoop ... gives a strong PNW First Nations vibe ... pointing to BOB as a NA native spirit that eventually shapes the host's physical vessel? codacorolla makes an excellent point about wearing the skin of other creatures (with snakeskin's allusion to shedding, although the shirt was not made from shedate).

Andy and Lucy are perfect, Deputy Chief Hawk really does tie the sheriff's department together!

All of the wide outdoor establishing shots are gorgeous.

I had completely forgotten about the whole "I will see in you 25 years" thing - that did originally happen, right?

Man, Matthew Lillard is really triggering my sense of mortality. I swear it was only a decade - not two+ - when he was in films as a goofy (overaged) teenager.
posted by porpoise at 10:42 AM on May 22, 2017 [5 favorites]


I think I only had one negative reaction - that was when the box watching guy starts making out with the woman, and that's the moment something breaks through the box and apparently kills them. Like, really? We're going back to the 80s horror B-movie thing where the kids who try to have sex are always the first to get axe murdered?

I was wondering whether they were set up by whoever runs the project as an offering to the thing that came through the box. The tension/flirtation between them is pretty obvious the first time Tracey comes by, and the guard seemed to be...studying it. So he reports that to his boss, who has everybody make themselves scarce the next night so box dude will sneak her in, and the thing that appears in the box now has two bodies to feed on (or a moment of human connection that enrages it enough to break through the box). My read of the scene was that the transgression that made the attack possible was box dude letting Tracey into the bunker, maybe breaking some kind of magic circle. That would also explain why Coop couldn't punch through when he appeared -- both of them were still outside.

After reading a few recaps, I'm surprised at how many complain about the pacing. I loved the lingering shots. They captured the dilation and acceleration of time in dreams, and seemed to point to the way time has passed in Twin Peaks and the Black Lodge -- slowly, all at once, and not at all.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 10:52 AM on May 22, 2017 [8 favorites]


I've watched all four episodes, so I'm going to be vague because I don't to accidentally spoil. And I apologize for losing track of the First Watch I was doing (the end of grad school happened, the Kid started binge watching, and there wasn't much interest in the threads, so I let it drop off. I can still keep doing them if it helps with continuity.)

Kyle MacLachlan just knocks it out of the park with the dual roles, though. I love that ShadowCoop has a different voice. He is just so into it.

I flailed happily when I saw that the front desk sign read Lucy Brennan. I also adore hippie Jerry. OF COURSE he's in the edible game. I bet butter and Brie on a baguette is great for munchies. Or a smoked cheese pig.

On preview, Matthew Lillard, man, yeah. I said to the Kid, "That looks like Matthew Lillard, but he's too old to be Matthew Lillard... (checks imdb) oh."

I had completely forgotten about the whole "I will see in you 25 years" thing - that did originally happen, right?

Having just finished watching the original seasons, Kid's mind was blown when I pointed out that Lynch did indeed start filming this 25 years later. That's one hell of a long game. Yeah, totally happened.
posted by Ruki at 10:53 AM on May 22, 2017 [9 favorites]


The 25 year thing did happen! That's amazing.
Tom and Lorenzo have a fun recap on their site, including a speculation the glass box is a metaphor for television and "the idiot box." The watchers are consumed and destroyed.
I thought the imagery of Cooper floating/being sucked out of the box, and then the circular window looked like a camera. Like the circle was the lens, Cooper was sucked through the lens and the "flash" was the picture.
I'm still processing so much, but it is great to have the gang back together. But Lara Flynn Boyle, man she really changed her entire face. It was distracting to see her and have to remind myself who she was. I find that really sad. But the other actresses and actors look amazing. I hope we get to see a lot more of Hawk and that he survives the series. I wonder if the log lady's clue that he will use "something from his heritage" pertains to dreams and dream interpretation? Hastings in his cell mentioned he had a dream that he saw Ruth Davenport's murder.
posted by areaperson at 11:21 AM on May 22, 2017


But Lara Flynn Boyle, man she really changed her entire face.

Lara Flynn Boyle's not in the show this time around....which scene were you talking about?
posted by Lucinda at 11:23 AM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


I was under the impression that Kyle MacLachlan has naturally grey/silver hair since a very early age - all of the returning male cast members have gone grey (most noticeably Michael Horse has gone full silver).

ShadowCoop has a thick head of black hair (although his face has aged the 25 years) but DoppleCoop also maintains the darkness (and adds length); the original BOB had long lanky iron-grey hair. I wonder if there is any meta in the decision here?

The ShadowGiant has aged, but Sheryl Lee/ShadowLauraPalmer uses archived footage.

--

I'm finding it particularly fitting that the actor Matthew Lillard ends up being cast as a highschool principal; the author of The Anarchist's Cookbook ... ended up being a highschool principal.

--

Nice callback by Jacoby - he takes off his dark sunglasses to reveal ... his 3D (blue/red) glasses.
posted by porpoise at 11:38 AM on May 22, 2017 [2 favorites]


I didn't post the Lara Flynn Boyle thing, but I have used her as an object lesson to my AFAB agender child regarding the patriarchal standards of beauty, because LFB really did change her face.

I also told the Kid that if Kyle MacLachlan doesn't win an Emmy for this, I'm going to punch someone in the face, to which Kid immediately responded, "Better find a Nazi then."

I find KMac's dye job strangely comforting. It's necessary for the plot, since the original series showed an aged Coop in the Red Room.
posted by Ruki at 11:42 AM on May 22, 2017 [5 favorites]


I sucked down all four episodes like a handful of garmonbozia, and all day long I've been unable to stop thinking about this show. It's better than the original, maybe? It's maybe the best thing to ever be on TV?

I'll probably temper my opinion as time passes, but right now, I'm giddy.
posted by painquale at 11:42 AM on May 22, 2017 [8 favorites]


For a second it looked a bit too weird Lynch and not enough quirky Lynch. Then I got served a dose of the Hornes and family drama in the jail, and was all uphill from there.

Sequencing-wise, I'm so, so glad that they ended the two-parter on that scene at the Roadhouse, and not just because Chromatics fits fantastically well into a modernized Twin Peaks. (I don't know Chromatics well at all, but damn, they do.)
The first minute I listened to Chromatics (via Glass Candy) 4 years ago or so I had the impression they would end up in something David Lynch - not only their sound has that ethereal quality that fits so well in his projects, but Ruth Radelet is stunning and mesmerizing on stage.
posted by lmfsilva at 12:07 PM on May 22, 2017


The ShadowGiant has aged, but Sheryl Lee/ShadowLauraPalmer uses archived footage.

The long haired Laura in the opening shots was archived - repeat from the final episode. But I think the later, shorter haired Laura was new. Her face looked older.
posted by dnash at 12:10 PM on May 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


I find KMac's dye job strangely comforting. It's necessary for the plot

Oh yeah, I remember that - make-up wrinkles with grey hair and all.

painquale; I'm not sure how the first episode (watching the second now) comes across to Twin Peaks-naive viewers? Having been a devote of the original 2 season run, I "get" a lot of things presented here. I think I'd be WTH is going on territory without that background.

Ah, thanks dnash.
posted by porpoise at 12:12 PM on May 22, 2017


Sorry, my mistake about Lara Flynn Boyle. I thought that was Donna sitting next to Shelley in the bar, and that Boyle was unrecognizable! Which she was hard to recognize, because it wasn't her. Sorry!
posted by areaperson at 6:59 PM on May 22, 2017


1. Was the 'bad' arm tree that appeared after 'something is wrong' trying to kill Coop with his 'nonexistence' shout?

Well, the good arm tree refers to its doppelganger, so, presumably that.

Anyone have a good reference for someone who last saw the first two seasons fourteen (gosh) years ago? I remember the black lodge and all but not "Project Bluebook" or this Briggs character. Or the whole James/Shelley thing.

3a. Since Don Davis AND Margaret Lanterman are dead,

Huh? The Log Lady was in this.
posted by kenko at 9:54 PM on May 22, 2017


Anyone have a good reference for someone who last saw the first two seasons fourteen (gosh) years ago?

Previously, on Twin Peaks...
A good hour long; seems to hit many of the important points.
posted by destructive cactus at 11:14 PM on May 22, 2017 [4 favorites]


The Arm having an evil Doppelgänger is an interesting development in the mythology. Originally, the Man From Another Place was thought to be a good guy because he gave Cooper clues that helped him solve Laura Palmer's murder. But fans started to reinterpret him as evil later in the series and in Fire Walk With Me because he was chummy with Bob and ate garmonbozia. If there were two of those guys all along, both interpretations can be right.
posted by painquale at 2:14 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


I don't know if Project Blue Book is ever mentioned in the show or FWWM, but it does come up in The Secret History of Twin Peaks, and it's a real thing not invented by Frost & Lynch.
posted by paper chromatographologist at 4:03 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Yes, Major Briggs was heavily involved.
posted by Grangousier at 4:33 AM on May 23, 2017


paper chromatographologist, that's what I enjoyed most about the Secreet History of Twin Peaks, how it would shoehorn fiction right in between fact. Project blue book, Jackie Gleasons extensive occult library in his UFO shaped house, the sex-cult that Jack White was a part of in the early days of the Jet Propulsion laboratory, all true.
posted by dr_dank at 4:51 AM on May 23, 2017


I think you mean Jack Parsons, although a Jack White-led sex cult would fit into this show altogether too well.
posted by kittens for breakfast at 5:16 AM on May 23, 2017 [5 favorites]


I don't know if Project Blue Book is ever mentioned in the show

PBB is directly referenced in the original show; Maj. Briggs reveals to Cooper that he was involved with the project prior to its end in 1970, and in an "unofficial capacity" afterwards. It's also revealed in S02 that Windom Earle was also involved with PBB prior to his mental breakdown.
posted by Strange Interlude at 5:24 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Or the whole James/Shelley thing.

You don't remember it because it definitely wasn't a thing. IIRC, James and Shelly didn't really interact on the original show, insofar as Shelly mainly appeared in two locations (the Double R and Leo's house) and whenever James showed up at the diner, it was in the context of a conversation with Donna or Norma. They moved in different social circles entirely.
posted by Strange Interlude at 5:32 AM on May 23, 2017


2a. How is the box tied to the black lodge (it appears to be, because that's where Coop ended up after getting booted from the lodge)?
2b .What was the face-eating thing in it? A spirit like BOB?


I haven't yet rewatched to confirm my speculation, but I thought the thing that appeared in the box and kills the kids at the beginning was a real-world manifestation of the evil arm-tree that we meet later. The box-manifestation has more of a humanoid body, but I feel like it had the same face. That would at least make sense as a manifestation of MIKE's left arm mirroring its original murderous intentions (when MIKE was still paired with BOB) ... and would also reinforce how the box serves as a dark portal to the Black Lodge.
posted by mykescipark at 9:54 AM on May 23, 2017 [3 favorites]


I haven't yet rewatched to confirm my speculation, but I thought the thing that appeared in the box and kills the kids at the beginning was a real-world manifestation of the evil arm-tree that we meet later.

Good call! I didn't make the connection to the doppelganger-Arm, but it makes sense. Could the Arm be trying to find BOB, either to kill him/drag him back to the Lodge, or perhaps to reform their partnership?
posted by Strange Interlude at 10:11 AM on May 23, 2017


Could the Arm be trying to find BOB, either to kill him/drag him back to the Lodge, or perhaps to reform their partnership?

My take on this was that the doppel-Arm was what was going wrong with the intended return of doppel-Coop / release of regular Coop—the doppel-Arm is trying to keep BOB out of the Lodge and dispose of Cooper for good.
posted by kenko at 11:21 AM on May 23, 2017


I thought the thing that appeared in the box and kills the kids at the beginning was a real-world manifestation of the evil arm-tree that we meet later.

Could the Arm be trying to find BOB, either to kill him/drag him back to the Lodge, or perhaps to reform their partnership?


I think the box-thing is the doppel-arm-tree (my partner pointed out that the mouths looked very similar), and it does want to team up with Bob, BUT that such a partnership would be a breach in the order of the show's cosmology. This video makes the case that Mike/the Arm/Tree-Prime feeds not on human pain and suffering, but on Bob's, and that by causing Bob to suffer, the Arm checks the full exercise of Bob's depravity. It's supposed to be an eternal struggle like the one between Raava and Vaatu in The Legend of Korra. A partnership between Bob and Doppel-Arm, unchecked by their complementary forces, would tip the balance of the world.

Based on that notion of necessary opposites, the doppel-arm-tree may have come into existence as a result of Coop's extended stay in the Black Lodge and feeds on something essential to him -- maybe his pain and suffering, or maybe his honorableness. There's more to this theory, but it would spoil bits of episodes 3 & 4, so I'll wait for the next thread.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 11:23 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


When Lucy & Andy mentioned that their son is named Wally, I immediately thought Oh my God, they named their son in memory of the mina bird from Season 1! I had misremembered the name at that point of course...It was Waldo. Still, sticking to my guns: Wally could be the more familiar form of Waldo.
posted by doctornecessiter at 11:33 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Wally Brennan could also be the namesake of the wonderful character actor from old westerns, Walter Brennan. He sort of worked in the same spheres as Hank Worden, the actor who played the senile bellhop in the season 1 finale.

Also does anyone know if the guy who played Oits (the awesomely named Redford Westwood) is related to Hank Worden? I thought there was a resemblance.
posted by paper chromatographologist at 11:44 AM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Welp, looks like it's time to dust off my yellowed old Post-It note and stick it back on my bathroom mirror:

"NEVER, EVER WATCH A DAVID LYNCH PRODUCTION WHILE YOU HAVE A FEVER."
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 1:24 PM on May 23, 2017 [4 favorites]


MYSTERY BOX
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 2:52 PM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


The setup of the glass box experiment is interesting. Camera 3 gets the sd card changed twice in fairly short succession, even though they're all the same type of camera presumably filming the same thing.
posted by dr_dank at 7:06 PM on May 23, 2017 [3 favorites]


One thing I noticed about the box, is that the first time we see it (opening scene, right?) it's framed in such a way that it resembles a human eye. Slowly the camera pulls out and we see it for what it actually is, but in that first shot it definitely looks like a stylized white and iris.
posted by codacorolla at 7:50 PM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Also, in terms of what may have been coming out of the box, my initial thought was Laura's doppelganger. The lodges seem to produce doppelgangers of everything (actually that's an interesting camera metaphor, since both film and photo cameras produce reversed duplicates). I don't think we see much of Laura's doppelganger, outside of a few brief appearances when Coop is in the lodge in FWWM and the series finale. Laura died before her doppelganger could get out, and then she presumably ascended to the white lodge. It would definitely be an evil and vengeful spirit, and it would explain the female shape that the monster seemed to have before it escaped confinement. Evil Laura would also have a reason to be drawn to, and also hate intimacy, given the way that she lived and died.
posted by codacorolla at 7:54 PM on May 23, 2017 [2 favorites]


The box is also very 2001-oblisk/computer-like to me. I'm thinking this season is going to be many film courses combined into one. When can we talk about episodes 3/4???
posted by armacy at 8:22 PM on May 23, 2017


What I wonder is, who owns the box? Who does the doomed watcher of the box work for? Ben mentions someone with "friends from New York" in his scene with Jerry -- is this the person? Could it be Audrey?
posted by kittens for breakfast at 8:27 PM on May 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


Laura's doppelgänger was Maddy.
posted by incster at 8:36 PM on May 23, 2017


I don't think there's anything to actually support that, is there?
posted by codacorolla at 8:44 PM on May 23, 2017


Other than that they were both played by Sheryl Lee, and they were both killed by Leland.
posted by incster at 8:59 PM on May 23, 2017


There's nothing stopping anyone from opening a new FanFare post for 3 & 4. I haven't seen them yet, or I'd do it myself.
posted by duffell at 9:09 PM on May 23, 2017 [3 favorites]


It might be a good idea. I've seen the first four episodes now, and it's hard to recall (beyond the major plot points) what happened in which.
posted by kittens for breakfast at 9:13 PM on May 23, 2017


You can't get PTSD from a television show, not even that one

I think Torchwood: Children Of Earth gave me mild PTSD for a while. It really fucked with me.

But then, so did Eraserhead.

I really loved this opening broadcast double episode. It just FELT so right. The lingering shots, the slow pacing, the using a television screen as a moving painting... Lynch always has loved created moving paintings.

I'm going to watch broadcast only, because I want the slow release and deliberate infusion into my life. This is an 18 hour long Lynch movie, and that is a glorious thing!
posted by hippybear at 2:53 AM on May 24, 2017 [2 favorites]


One thing I noticed about the box, is that the first time we see it (opening scene, right?) it's framed in such a way that it resembles a human eye. Slowly the camera pulls out and we see it for what it actually is, but in that first shot it definitely looks like a stylized white and iris.

Following up on this metaphor, the monster breaking free from the box can be interpreted as continuing the Bunuelian injury-to-eye motif that recurs throughout the original series (straight off my dome: Nadine's eyepatch, Cooper's shooting range prowess, the gunshot wound on the decapitated head.) and a message to the viewer to hold on to their eyeballs, cause shit's about to get unreal.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:05 AM on May 24, 2017 [3 favorites]


What I wonder is, who owns the box? Who does the doomed watcher of the box work for? Ben mentions someone with "friends from New York" in his scene with Jerry -- is this the person? Could it be Audrey?

If it's Audrey, and she's set this whole thing up just to save Cooper, I'm gonna cry like a baby.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:07 AM on May 24, 2017 [8 favorites]


If the returning cast serve largely as tonal vignettes showing how people are still carrying their baggage from twenty-five years ago, I would not mind in the least.
It will definitely be interesting to see how prominently the wider original cast features in this new story; apart from Cooper/Doppelcooper all we've gotten are these little snippets - in lesser hands it could be pure fan service, but so far it feels more like my 20th high school reunion, where I had multiple small interactions with these people I hadn't seen in so many years, and came away sobered/shocked by how old we all got. As someone who was in their teens/early twenties when they watched the original series, I found the scene with James and Shelly particularly affecting.
posted by Funeral march of an old jawbone at 7:10 AM on May 24, 2017 [4 favorites]


The premiere on Sunday had half a million viewers, while the original series premiere in 1990 had 35 million. I understand the reasons for this but it's still mind boggling.
posted by paper chromatographologist at 7:11 AM on May 24, 2017 [1 favorite]


The premiere on Sunday had half a million viewers, while the original series premiere in 1990 had 35 million. I understand the reasons for this but it's still mind boggling.

Does that include streaming/time-shift watching, though? I think I read elsewhere that last weekend Showtime got the largest increase in account sign-ups they've ever had. (Including me. - which means I also finally get to watch Homeland and Masters of Sex.)
posted by dnash at 7:51 AM on May 24, 2017


Laura's doppelgänger was Maddy.
I'm still holding out for redhead Sheryl Lee.
posted by lmfsilva at 7:51 AM on May 24, 2017 [2 favorites]


The premiere on Sunday had half a million viewers

That's only counting people who watched on their TVs via cable, which totally ignores streaming and on-demand. Basically everyone I know who watched the premiere did so via streaming, either through Hulu or via the Showtime app. Even though Showtime permitted streaming concurrently with the cable premiere (the show magically appeared in my Hulu queue at 9 PM EST on Sunday), the freakishly outdated conventional TV ratings system doesn't take those viewers into account.

I don't imagine that the viewer numbers will ever match what the original show's premiere got (because nothing does) but this seems like more of an indicator of where the viewers for challenging prestige content are now -- and it isn't the people who are still paying for conventional cable packages. It's the cord-cutters who only want to pay for the content they want to watch, and don't care about getting 100+ channels of stupefying reality programming along with it. Time will tell if this gamble pays off for Showtime, but they've got me as a brand-new customer for the duration.
posted by Strange Interlude at 8:39 AM on May 24, 2017 [1 favorite]


The rest of Showtime's line-up is pretty weak, IMO. If they could guarantee me another Lynch directed series, or something with a similar feel, then I'd be all over it.
posted by codacorolla at 10:19 AM on May 24, 2017 [1 favorite]


I agree that Showtime has a serious content problem. Dexter was a nice marquee show for them for many years -- though the final seasons were terrible I don't think it ever suffered in the ratings department -- and it led into Homeland, which was a pretty good show (and zeitgeist-y) for a few seasons. Masters of Sex had a great cast, at least, and even half-hour dramedies United States of Tara and Nurse Jackie were pretty watchable (and, I must point out, refreshingly woman-centric). But once Twin Peaks runs out, I'm not sure Showtime has anything left but an increasingly mediocre Homeland, and I don't know if that's enough.

On the other hand, holy cow, Twin Peaks by itself is worth paying for Showtime.
posted by Mothlight at 11:12 AM on May 24, 2017 [2 favorites]


I have the same feeling as Mothlight on Showtime's lineup. The only other Showtime series that I've watched to the end is Dexter, solely for the sake of closure on a show that I sincerely liked for its first few seasons and barely even tolerated for the last few. I was really high on Homeland for the first season, but drifted away for various reasons; I also gave Penny Dreadful a chance on Netflix, but didn't care for how they wrapped up the first season.

The rest of their lineup feels uncomfortably like eating my premium cable TV vegetables. I might check out Masters of Sex because I've heard good things, but damned if the title doesn't make me feel like a pervazoid for watching it.
posted by Strange Interlude at 11:26 AM on May 24, 2017


On the other hand, holy cow, Twin Peaks by itself is worth paying for Showtime.

I did the Showtime add-on for Prime. Every episode of Twin Peaks costs me roughly the price of a coffee, which I think is perfectly fitting.

I do wonder how many cherry pies were consumed last Sunday. That would be a more interesting number to me than straight cable ratings.

There's nothing stopping anyone from opening a new FanFare post for 3 & 4. I haven't seen them yet, or I'd do it myself.

I think I might do that. We're halfway between airings now, so I think it's a good time for it.
posted by Ruki at 12:41 PM on May 24, 2017 [3 favorites]


but so far it feels more like my 20th high school reunion

This was the overwhelming feeling for me, at least for the first two episodes. While I've rewatched Twin Peaks a couple of times in the intervening 25 years, my main feelings about the show go back to when I was 20 and watching it for the first time. All these people who were young when I was young, and the 25 years just blink and here we are. Feels like such a long when we were living through it, but looking back and 25 years seem like nothing. Hits especially hard since many of the actors didn't do much (at least in the things I've watched) after Twin Peaks, so I haven't seen them age and change.

It's especially poignant seeing middle-aged Laura. She never got the chance to grow up, go to college, get the hell away from the stifling small town and her abusive father. And yet, there she is. 40+ years old. With the sad smile of experience. I'm hoping this difference becomes part of the story. Being trapped in the Black Lodge for decades makes me think of the broken woman trapped in Talos IV in Star Trek's original pilot "The Cage". I'm sure Lynch won't take this route story-wise, but my head canon will be that the time in the Lodge would contain some illusions&dreams where Laura does get to experience the life she never had, and grow into the person / spirit that she is now.

My one other silly observation is how retro the show is in terms of pacing. Lynch has always been slow, and I agree with what hippybear said above about making it a slow-moving painting. But one thing which is strikingly retro is the use of all these establishing shots. Taking the time to watch the car pull into the lot and park. The time spent walking from one place to another with no dialogue or story. The quiet time spent pulling a cigarette out and lighting it.

Modern television cuts much of that out. Older shows, pre-90's especially, were slow and deliberate by comparison, even in the shows considered high action for their time. Lynch has always had this slow style, so I'm not sure if he's deliberately evoking an earlier time, but has this nice nostalgic effect nonetheless. I'm curious what the under 30's, the ones who didn't have TV like this in their lives, think about this slow pacing.
posted by honestcoyote at 8:26 PM on May 25, 2017 [4 favorites]


I just watched this and I have a really important question and I need an answer:

Do I exist?
posted by adept256 at 4:33 AM on May 26, 2017 [4 favorites]


One thing I noticed about the box, is that the first time we see it (opening scene, right?) it's framed in such a way that it resembles a human eye. Slowly the camera pulls out and we see it for what it actually is, but in that first shot it definitely looks like a stylized white and iris.

And as a connection with all the camera/film symbolism, the box is an inverted camera: a box full of light, looking out into darkness through the "lens" (that tube going outside). The half of the box that's outside is more like a traditional camera, a dark box looking out into the light through its lens.
posted by jason_steakums at 8:59 AM on May 26, 2017


All of these great observations about Lynch riffing on television and Bunuelian eye injuries reminded me that one of the underlying themes of the original series was what we see, or don't. Offered a horrible truth, do we face it or do we look away?

Laura and Coop shared a refusal to look away. That refusal empowered Coop to solve her murder, which was as much the result of a single brutal act as the culmination of a thousand overlooked evils. Laura's neighbors were not bad people, but their conviction that It Can't Happen Here, their refusal to see, made her abuse possible. Laura and Coop's willingness to see clearly is also, I think, what gave them access to the Black Lodge: In order to confront your shadow self you first have to able to face that you have one, to recognize that your humanity is as susceptible to committing horrors as enduring them.

Those who do look away lose some part of their vision. Nadine turns a blind eye to Ed still loving Norma. Leland (and probably Bill Hastings) can be possessed and manipulated by dark forces because they refuse to face the inner darknesses that allow those forces to gain purchase. Their subsequent amnesia is not so much induced as permitted by their possessors, a consummate (if temporary) means of avoiding the truth. I've only watched the first two seasons once so far, but I'm willing to bet that the characters most invested in the plot of Invitation to Love were also willfully blind to their own reality. They chose television -- a mediated vision of a fictional world -- over a clear, if painful, vision of their own lives.

Colm Tóibín gave a talk recently about how his newest novel, which retells the story of Clytemnestra, is meant to evoke the experience of watching a performance of Aeschylus or Euripides. He described those playwrights' intent to inspire "pity and terror," to deny the audience the comfort of looking away, to ensure via ritual reenactment a collective resolve not to commit those crimes again. As much as Lynch's lingering shots make beautiful moving paintings, they also dare viewers to look, to see everything the lens sees, to face all our pity and terror. To do otherwise is to pluck out our eyes and cast ourselves out of existence and into the void.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 6:10 PM on May 26, 2017 [5 favorites]


DoppelCoop
Coop Bob
Evil Mr. C


COOPERDUPER
posted by the painkiller at 7:37 PM on May 28, 2017 [6 favorites]


My notes:
I laughed so hard upon Dr. Jacoby being delivered 4 shovels.
The NYC box scenes were PERFECT. I loved everything about them.
So amazing they filmed those Log Lady scenes before her death. R.I.P.
Loved DoppelCoop's statements of "I don't need anything. I WANT."
The ghoul in the jail cell fucked me right up and I see it as a direct parallel to the Behind The Winkies scene in Mulholland drive. Especially considered the Winkie's actor plays the CEO/businessman who has an ominous warning.
The arm tree seemed like fanservice throwback to those of us that liked the 70s shorts like 6 Figures Getting Sick and The Grandmother.
Love the Julee Cruise homage via The Chromatics performing at the bar.
Hawk walking through the forest scared a bit in a Blair Witch way. Him receiving a phone call from The Log Lady was the warmest bit of nostalgia comfort and it made me feel much better.
posted by Theta States at 11:22 AM on May 29, 2017 [2 favorites]


COOPERDUPER

Cooperganger?
posted by leotrotsky at 1:41 PM on May 30, 2017


COOPERDUPER
Now I am shouting COOPERDUPER in my head like Peter Boyle in Young Frankenstein.
posted by Funeral march of an old jawbone at 4:52 PM on May 30, 2017 [5 favorites]


"Camera 3 gets the sd card changed twice in fairly short succession, even though they're all the same type of camera presumably filming the same thing."

I think that's explainable by the first time we see him doing the Card Thing it's Day 01. Camera 03 needs to be changed out around, say, 7PM. Lady friend shows up with coffee and is denied entrance. Then the next time we see him changing out a card it's also at the same time that lady friend shows up with coffee on Day 02. This makes me think that Camera 03 needs card change every day around, say, 7PM.

Instead of being a mistake I felt it helped cement the kind of person that lady friend was, in that she is super-punctual and would show up at exactly the same time the next day. Plus, it also helped reinforce that nightmare sense of "I'm doing the same thing as I always do but this time something's wrong."
posted by komara at 10:32 PM on June 26, 2017 [2 favorites]


Watching again - it's the first time I've noticed the size of Hank Fillmore's phone. That's not normal, is it?

Though, obviously, this would not be the place to fault something for not being normal.
posted by Grangousier at 5:21 AM on July 3, 2017


In the NYC watcher's room, I kept waiting for the bonsai to be/do something, or someone to knock it over and discover that it had a hidden mic inside.
posted by filthy light thief at 10:46 AM on July 10, 2017


it's the first time I've noticed the size of Hank Fillmore's phone.

Hank's phone is a "phablet", midway between a normal smartphone and a small tablet. It's a form factor that's become less popular over the last few years (mostly because the average size/resolution of smartphone screens is larger than they were just 5 years ago) but you still see them around.
posted by Strange Interlude at 11:54 AM on July 10, 2017


At first, I thought the NYC glass box scenes were unnecessarily boring. And then, sweet jesus, the manifestation scared me! I had got lulled but learned my lesson.

I loved the Black Lodge scenes in the original Twin Peaks, always wanted more of them, and these episodes delivered big time.

It's interesting to me to see all these actors now aged and in the same story. Linklater has done this with his Before Sunrise films, I don't think I have ever seen anything like it on TV (not counting reunion shows).
posted by OrderOctopoda at 12:17 PM on September 18, 2017 [1 favorite]


Everyone in that cabin looked bizarre but especially loved Rick's hypotelorism and Darya's hypertelorism.
You just know that doppelganger Cooper smells so fucking terrible.
I watched and rewatched a lot of the original Twin Peaks while covering my eyes. I've vowed that I'm not going to do that with season 3. So yay, fat hairy body + tiny decapitated head.
Man, poor Andy got _old_. From the looks of it, him and Hawk should both be collecting social security.
I loved them using the sex = death trope that was so common in horror movies. It really stands out because otherwise Lynch avoids so many horror tropes. Time and again while watching this I was sure X was about to happen and then ... it didn't.
I care about the Horne brothers as much as I care about Dorne in GOT.
Laura getting swept up into the air... What did that mean? She seemed so happy at the end of FWWM and I was happy for her. I thought she was safe wherever she was. She's a great screamer.
It all is so beautifully filmed. I don't know if that's because Lynch has a bigger budget or because technology is better.
My god, I wonder collectively how much this cast has spent on plastic surgery.
I laughed when they cut to Las Vegas and the score was jazzy. Jazz and Vegas, what? I do love seeing Patrick Fischler.
I loved the phone calls between Hawk and the Log Lady. They were so comfortable and familiar. Two extraordinary people who have been living in this simmering nightmare for 25 years. Also, cellphones! Makes the woods a different place.
Ugh I just googled pictures of that guy in the jail cell and now I don't think I can sleep.
posted by great_radio at 11:26 PM on September 23, 2017


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