Klaus (2019)
January 27, 2020 9:06 AM - Subscribe

A simple act of kindness always sparks another, even in a frozen, faraway place. When Smeerensburg's new postman, Jesper, befriends toymaker Klaus, their gifts melt an age-old feud and deliver a sleigh full of holiday traditions. A 2020 Academy Award nominee for Best Animated Feature. Streamable on Netflix. With Jason Schwartzmann, J. K. Simmons, and Rashida Jones.

A European production, led by Spanish creatives. Set in a mythical Northern European land inspired by Norway and including supporting Saami characters, the film is a little puzzling at first but gathers momentum. The use of color in the winter landscapes can be breathtaking. A new take on Santa with a dollop of Neal Stephenson’s The Postman.

The structure of the film borrows from Westerns, and the character of Klaus is ultimately a tragic one, which really is kind of a new way to think about Santa.
posted by mwhybark (9 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
I liked this movie quite a bit, and it was visually really striking. Solidly recommend it for non-insufferable Christmastime viewing.
posted by Sokka shot first at 9:54 AM on January 27, 2020 [6 favorites]


Utterly charming, an instant classic. As soon as I was done watching it I watched it again.
posted by the webmistress at 12:43 PM on January 27, 2020 [1 favorite]


The Jilderlings, age 6 and a half and 2 and a half, both enjoyed this one quite a bit. It's also good viewing for parents, too.
posted by Jilder at 3:26 AM on January 29, 2020


Since it's almost February, is this worth watching well outside the Christmas season, or should I save it for December?
posted by asnider at 3:20 PM on January 29, 2020


Yeah, really liked this one. That moment of figuring out what the magical wind was was very moving.

Umm, but The Postman was by David Brin.
posted by rhamphorhynchus at 6:44 PM on January 29, 2020


Since it's almost February, is this worth watching well outside the Christmas season, or should I save it for December?

I was in a Target store last night and they were playing "Wonderful Christmastime," so apparently nothing means anything anymore. Go nuts!
posted by rhizome at 7:56 PM on January 29, 2020


Since it's almost February, is this worth watching well outside the Christmas season, or should I save it for December?

datapoint one: I watched it as a part of my customary voluntary awards season deathmarch, wherein I actively attempt to learn nothing about any of the nominated films I have not seen organically in the prior year, which is usually most of them, including this one. When I realized this was an Xmas movie and I was watching it in January, I actually groaned in irritation but stuck with it because a bad plan is still a plan. I am glad I watched it; I am unlikely to watch it again.

datapoint two: you could, like, prerun it, skipping around or whatever, and just remember to watch it in a year. I mean, if you can do that.

i guess, in my view, if you are more likely to forget about the movie by xmas and not watch it then, watch it now. it is worth seeing.
posted by mwhybark at 3:22 AM on January 30, 2020 [1 favorite]


I loved the visuals but the plot is a bit labored.
posted by argybarg at 3:27 AM on January 30, 2020


I am sure I sighed audibly when we hit the "folks find out about the protagonist's initial ulterior motives" trope and subsequent acceptance back into the fold, but for all it being by the numbers it's still above average as a kids holiday movie. My seven-year-old enjoyed it, and I appreciated it as someone who will have to wrestle with him learning the truth about Santa down the road. It'll be useful for him to have consumed a variety of what if Santa was this instead and how did Santa come to be anyway pieces of media.

And "I get to see my friend" was really sweet.
posted by phearlez at 9:36 AM on February 3, 2020 [1 favorite]


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