Agent Carter: Bridge and Tunnel
January 7, 2015 3:14 AM - Season 1, Episode 2 - Subscribe

Peggy hunts the milk truck filled with weaponized nitramene, tries to find a new place to live, and learns how to deal with Jarvis.

"Peggy politely declines an offer from her waitress pal, Angie, to become her new neighbor. One gets the sense she does so to protect her friend from danger. She’s convinced by Jarvis to temporarily stay at Howard Stark’s house. It’s a place the millionaire playboy uses for private entertaining. Peggy brushes off Jarvis’s request to help her hunt for a milk truck filled with experimental nitramene at the Daisy Clover Dairy headquarters. She poses as a health inspector to do some digging. She gets the name of the driver of a missing truck. Peggy is looking for someone named Sheldon McFee.

Chief Dooley and Jack Thompson gaze at the imploded mess that was once the Roxxon chemical refinery. They pay a visit to the company’s CEO, Hugh Jones, who brings up Howard Stark’s work with vita-radiation. Back at the office, Agent Sousa has received photos of the blonde who was seen with Spider Raymond at his club. Peggy’s effort to sneak a peek to see if she’s recognizable is thwarted by a phone call from the chief. She’s summoned to help determine if any of the ladies of Rexxon were exposed to vita-rays. The theory is the implosion could have been the result of an inside job.

During the screenings for vita-ray contamination, Peggy recognizes the scientist she saw at the refinery with Leet Brannis. His name is Van Ert. Peggy manages to single-handedly foil his attempt to flee. She’s later asked to take off while Van Ert is brutally interrogated by Thompson. Elsewhere, the man in the green suit is on the hunt for Leet Brannis, the thief who stole the experimental nitramene. After interrogating and killing a local mob boss, he follows a lead on a buyer. A ledger Green Suit swiped from Spider Raymond has the address of Gino Delucia inside. Another killer interrogation provides the info he needs.

Peggy is only slightly ahead of all those in pursuit of runaway milk truck driver Sheldon McFee. Her fellow agents and the man in the green suit are also on their way to his house in Cedar Grove. McFee is inside listening to the Captain America-themed radio program that Peggy can’t stand. A brutal fight takes place. McFee is neutralized and Leet Brannis is caught trying to steal the milk truck thanks to some help from Jarvis. Peggy, Jarvis and Brannis hit the road. The man in the green suit joins them by leaping onto the milk truck’s roof.

Back near the house, Dooley and Thompson pick up a fleeing Sheldon McFee. On the road, Peggy does battle with Green Suit atop the truck. BANG! BANG! A gunshot-wounded Brannis is grabbed by Jarvis. Peggy pulls them onto the road as the milk truck careens off a cliff into water below. BOOM! A massive explosion rocks the night. Brannis is a dying mess. He draws a symbol of a heart bisected by a line in the dirt before his lights go out completely. Peggy and Jarvis exit the scene before Dooley and Thompson arrive to discover a woman’s footprints. Agent Sousa finds a hotel key that fell out of Green Suit’s pocket during his fight with Peggy.

Jarvis stitches up a wounded Peggy, who doesn’t allow herself to get close to anyone. Jarvis reminds her that she can’t carry the world on her shoulders alone. No one can. This mini-pep talk has Peggy allowing Jarvis to continue his patch-up work. It also has her reconsidering Angie’s offer to be her neighbor at the Griffith Hotel. Back at work, Peggy is relieved that there was no clear photo of her in that blonde wig at the club. She dodged a bullet. She has no idea, however, that Agent Krzeminski just found the license plate of the Stark car Peggy was using in the Rexxon implosion debris." (summary from ABC.com)
posted by inturnaround (73 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
Trivial thoughts:

Sheldon McFee was played by Devin Ratray, the actor who played Kevin's brother Buzz from the "Home Alone" films.

On her checklist while working undercover doing dairy inspection, Peggy has given up pretense on her clipboard and started listing her grocery list. Among the items are PG Tips, HP Sauce and Digestives.

Anton Vanko, the Russian scientist who works for Stark, is the father of the man who would become the Iron Man 2 villain Whiplash.
posted by inturnaround at 3:29 AM on January 7, 2015 [10 favorites]


Ha! I'd missed the Vanko connection.
posted by rmd1023 at 5:37 AM on January 7, 2015


The fight scene paired up against the Captain America radio play was...magnificent.
posted by Atreides at 7:04 AM on January 7, 2015 [18 favorites]


Too right, Atreides. The action/foley juxtapositions happening in that fight scene were exactly the sort of thing that I'd hoped to see in the Watchmen film, but we never got because the whole thing got smooshed down to a 2 hour film, instead of being the 12-part cable series the material demanded.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:18 AM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


That scene, which was so fantastic, was the best example of not only the show being unashamed of its comics roots but wallowing in them and bringing them to the screen in an interesting way that honestly hasn't been done so far in the MCU.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 7:24 AM on January 7, 2015 [7 favorites]


My only nitpick of the episode was the scene where the SSR guys bring the compressed Roxxon refinery wreckage in on a flatbed truck. I'm no physicist, but if the bombs had actually blown up an oil refinery and then scrunched all the bits into a 50-foot ball, that wouldn't be the sort of thing you could just load onto a truck and then pry apart with crowbars. You'd barely be able to move it just because of the mass alone. But I'll forgive the weird science because the writing, acting, and direction were otherwise excellent.

(See there, Gotham? If you can't be perfect, at least be well-done. That's all we ask.)
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:31 AM on January 7, 2015 [8 favorites]


Heard Vanko and made A Noise.
posted by The Whelk at 7:41 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Also, yeah The a Captain America adventure Program was a bit of genius, also I'm pretty sure that's one of the brains in a jar from Old World a Blues as the narrator so along with Rusty Venture as the scientist you've got a bit of a Fallout: New Vegas reunion.
posted by The Whelk at 7:43 AM on January 7, 2015


(See there, Gotham? If you can't be perfect, at least be well-done. That's all we ask.)

Exactly - I will forgive bending physics. I cannot forgive Three's Company style phone mix-ups between the main character's boring girlfriend and a pre-teen Poison Ivy doing some B&E.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 8:07 AM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


By the way, the episode was directed by Joe Russo, yes, one of the brothers who directed Captain America 2.

I also had the issue with the ball of junk from the factor, Strange Interlude. I commented to my wife, "There's no way that should be moveable by that truck!" My in-show explanation was that the bomb actually vaporized the majority of the factory and what not, and only the remaining debris was sucked back into a ball.

Going back to the radio fight, i about babbled myself incoherent out of my excitement that the show was straight up screaming at us, "She's Captain America!" And by Captain America, that she's as much a super hero as our ice cubed fellow in the north. I thought it was pretty dang empowering of the character, establishing her credibility as an equal and obviously, so very strongly obviously, not a damsel in distress.

The interrogation of the Roxxon employee was somewhat disturbing. I couldn't tell if it was just to infer that "law enforcement" did things differently in the past or if we aer supposed to accept that the SSR operate outside the law and realm of civil rights. I also assume that Hydra had not begun its infiltration of the agency that will one day be officially SHIELD by this point, either. It was somewhat disturbing that the men just callously watched a prisoner be beaten to a pulp.

I thought the dialogue was a step up from the previous episode and a bit more witty. "I love to go home after a long day's work and tie myself to a chair and take a walk..."

Leviathan. Hm. They don't want people talking without little voice boxes. They have remote controlled typewriters (which, I guess, will be discovered by the SSR next episode). Even though Sam, Dean and Castiel defeated them a season or two, I reckon I'll see how Agent Carter does it.
posted by Atreides at 8:22 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


The interrogation of the Roxxon employee was somewhat disturbing. I couldn't tell if it was just to infer that "law enforcement" did things differently in the past or if we aer supposed to accept that the SSR operate outside the law and realm of civil rights. I also assume that Hydra had not begun its infiltration of the agency that will one day be officially SHIELD by this point, either. It was somewhat disturbing that the men just callously watched a prisoner be beaten to a pulp.

Yeah, the most I can figure is that the scene was meant as a sort of 'this is how Hydra was able to infiltrate' sort of thing - that the SSR wasn't filled with awesome people. On the other hand, it's not like AoS really shies away from the 'good guys' doing torture scenes, either.
posted by dinty_moore at 8:31 AM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


Isn't Levithian is the soviet equivalent to HYDRA?

Cause even in this time line there's another face from Carter's past wandering around with no memories and big ass red star on his arm.
posted by The Whelk at 8:32 AM on January 7, 2015


Also "I saw him at the USO show in Passiac!" Still love that this universe's cap was a show business figure before he got famous for actual heroics.
posted by The Whelk at 8:35 AM on January 7, 2015 [5 favorites]


I was in paroxysms of joy over that scene juxtaposing Peggy with the Captain America radio drama. She's Cap! She's saving herself! I cannot textually render how much I loved that scene and what it was saying about Peggy and Captain America.

I also really love that this series is showing that the world is already forgetting Steve Rogers in favor of the Captain America mask. It makes Peggy's grief that much sharper that Captain America is already the stuff of legend while Peggy is one of the few people who remembers Steve, who has to pull a photo of skinny pre-Serum Steve Rogers out of a file box to remind herself of who he was.

I am also super in love with the fact that Peggy is a stone cold badass who goes around beating dudes up while looking fabulous. That moment when she coolly sauntered downstairs to catch Van Ert while the other agents were running around breathlessly...*swoons*
posted by yasaman at 9:45 AM on January 7, 2015 [11 favorites]


Isn't Levithian is the soviet equivalent to HYDRA?

Marker down that they're the cinematic version of The Secret Empire.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:54 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


I noticed that the "next time on Agent Carter!" promo had NO KISSING and I am more happy about the seeming lack of a boring romance subplot than I probably should be.

There isn't one, right? I may have just willfully blocked it out.
posted by everybody had matching towels at 12:49 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


That moment when she coolly sauntered downstairs to catch Van Ert while the other agents were running around breathlessly...*swoons*


How many people did I almost swipe with my briefcase on the way to work today? More than one, certainly.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 12:58 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


I don't care, the preview had machines guns in it and my one true pairing has always been Peggy/Machine Guns
posted by The Whelk at 12:59 PM on January 7, 2015 [7 favorites]


I hope someone takes note somewhere: You can have a show with a strong, capable, tough female lead and you don't need to introduce romantic sub-plots to make her or the show interesting.
posted by nubs at 1:33 PM on January 7, 2015 [5 favorites]


This was a super fun show! Agents of Shield took a few episodes to find its legs, but Agent Carter is bringing right from the start. Although, seeing how good this was just reminded me how bad The Librarians actually is. I'll probably have to give up on Librarians.
posted by Arbac at 1:51 PM on January 7, 2015


Jarvis is DAPPER AS HELL, and I want someone to introduce me to his tailor.
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 1:58 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


You'd barely be able to move it just because of the mass alone.

I don't think the physics of mass work the same way on Earth-199999 as on Earth-1218. Another example of this is where does all the extra mass come from when Bruce Banner transforms into the Hulk?
posted by Jacqueline at 2:07 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Favorite moment of this series so far -- possibly even all of television, for all time --

"That's Sara(h). She's a slut."
posted by Sara C. at 2:25 PM on January 7, 2015 [6 favorites]




Favorite moment of this series so far -- possibly even all of television, for all time --

At least I get some vindication. I got a glance from my wife when I snorted over that side comment as the waitress was identifying everyone to Carter.

Pssst Sara C. Is recapping Agent Carter for the Mary Sue!

Sarah C., be sure to drop a link above to your recap!
posted by Atreides at 2:51 PM on January 7, 2015


My only nitpick of the episode was the scene where the SSR guys bring the compressed Roxxon refinery wreckage in on a flatbed truck. I'm no physicist, but if the bombs had actually blown up an oil refinery and then scrunched all the bits into a 50-foot ball, that wouldn't be the sort of thing you could just load onto a truck and then pry apart with crowbars. You'd barely be able to move it just because of the mass alone. But I'll forgive the weird science because the writing, acting, and direction were otherwise excellent.

At one point, someone says that the ball of debris weighs ten tons. So it's definitely not all of the factory. But a truck that size should be able to shift ten tons, right? I don't know trucks.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 2:53 PM on January 7, 2015


I found this show to be audibly difficult to follow. Something about the loud period music, and the juxtaposition of the radio drama with the actual events, was kinda cacophonous. That, combined with the SUPER DARK lighting, made it difficult for me to understand what was happening enough to anticipate the next scene. I'm not normally so bewildered by shows I watch, and I didn't like it. but, I do look forward to the next episode.
posted by rebent at 3:23 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


I liked the glimpse of her shopping list: digestives, PG Tips, HP Sauce. You can take the girl out of England...
posted by sobarel at 5:53 PM on January 7, 2015


Yeah the audio mix was weird, and I said before it was really ...murky. Like I kept wondering where the key light was.
posted by The Whelk at 6:00 PM on January 7, 2015


Tom and Lorenzo: Peggy Carter is a capital S Superhero.
posted by The Whelk at 6:06 PM on January 7, 2015


also, from the comments - a dapper british gent paired up with an asskicking woman brings to mind another show about spies called Avengers....
posted by The Whelk at 6:14 PM on January 7, 2015 [8 favorites]


I am more happy about the seeming lack of a boring romance subplot than I probably should be.

I got momentarily excited when it occurred to me that maybe Tony Stark's mother hadn't been specified in the MCU, but alas, Maria has been mentioned in the movies already.
posted by Rock Steady at 6:45 PM on January 7, 2015


I don't think The Avengers ever did any spying. They were more like detectives in a vaguely psychedelic busybody mould, dressed by Jermyn and Carnaby Streets.

And you're never going to beat Emma Peel / John Steed for personal chemistry and charisma, but it's a dashed good place to be aiming for.
posted by sobarel at 6:52 PM on January 7, 2015


Considering I wanted to be John Steed when I grew up, it seems like an admirable target.
posted by The Whelk at 6:59 PM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


It's interesting to compare Marcus & McFeely's social commentary here to that in Steven Soderbergh's nearly contemporary period drama. When you think about the depth to which Soderbergh was able to take his critique in The Knick-- he touched on themes as diverse as racism, sexism, family sexual violence, and structural violence-- M&M's critique seems unidimensional, focused almost exclusively on sexism and missing obvious opportunities to talk about everything from police violence and torture to industrial waste.

Granted, there have only been two episodes, but I think Soderbergh's real strength was his ability to use brief, fleeting moments that obliquely address a given social ill, almost alluding to it. Imagine the camera holding just a bit longer on the face of the man as Carter leaves him to be tortured for information, rather than incorporating police violence into a physical comedy gag.

I believe these two episodes demonstrate an acute sensitivity to sexism, and I suppose I'm still behind a show that decides to focus its social commentary exclusively on one kind of injustice, but I still lament that the world has so few works that achieve Soderbergh's or Simon's level of completeness.
posted by The White Hat at 7:04 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


I got momentarily excited when it occurred to me that maybe Tony Stark's mother hadn't been specified in the MCU, but alas, Maria has been mentioned in the movies already.

Also, it would make Tony seem pretty awful if Peggy were his mom and he never mentioned it, let alone visited her in the hospital. If she was anything to Tony other than an old friend of his dad's, we'd know about it by now.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:43 PM on January 7, 2015 [5 favorites]


Yeah, the idea didn't hold up to very much scrutiny from a bunch of angles, but it was intriguing for a moment's diversion. Might make for a neat Marvel AU: What If the Avengers were related to each other?
posted by Rock Steady at 8:33 PM on January 7, 2015


Also, let's face it, Howard Stark is pretty clearly barely going to be in the show at all and in the few scenes they had, Peggy had no chemistry with him at all.

If I'm sailing any ship, I'm sailing the Pegouza ship. Though honestly I'd rather it be a fling than anything serious. I think Peggy deserves a nice rebound/some mindless fucking.

That said, there are only eight episodes, so it doesn't feel like there'll be time for romance. Also I love this in a lot of the ways that I love (British) Prime Suspect, and if Peggy was always having random flings with coworkers it would feel a little too Tennyson. I want this to be its own thing.
posted by Sara C. at 10:01 PM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


Man, that was way fun. More like this, please, Hollywood!

And frankly I don't think the sexism was overplayed. It's the kind of thing that just was in the atmosphere, and stayed there for a really long time (and is still there in some places), well into the 80s. A lot of women got used to it and learned to deal with it, but just because you got used to it didn't mean all those little micro-aggressions weren't there.

Happily, I can watch this without cringing (unlike Mad Men), because I know they can't hold Peggy Carter down.
posted by suelac at 10:14 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


so it doesn't feel like there'll be time for romance

Also she like, literally JUST lost Steve in a completely horrible way like just before she even acknowledged she was falling for him. Everyone else gets to remember Captain America the cartoon war hero but only she knew Steve Rogers.

Like I can see a fling but serious romance seems off the plate
posted by The Whelk at 10:24 PM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


More thoughts on the premiere, with swooning (of course) over Peggy's mad skills.

I'm not shipping Peggy with anyone in particular, though clearly she does get married at some point. But for now, it makes sense that she's not interested in anyone, as she's still grieving over Steve and probably is generally disgusted with most men at the moment.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 7:25 AM on January 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


I believe these two episodes demonstrate an acute sensitivity to sexism, and I suppose I'm still behind a show that decides to focus its social commentary exclusively on one kind of injustice, but I still lament that the world has so few works that achieve Soderbergh's or Simon's level of completeness.

I haven't seen The Nick, but my expectation is that this is a show focused outright on being a white woman in 1940's Post-War America, and as such, the social ills will be centered on those she personally encounters. Given how much thought was put toward high lighting the ugliness of an era that is often highlighted as perfect America in other media, I would not be surprised to see more social commentary later on, if it makes sense to include it. Was there a passing bit of prejudice toward Sousa's character for being disabled?

One of the scenes that really struck me was when Carter was expected to essentially serve as a secretary, despite the fact they were professional equals. Not too long ago, I was reading about the experiences of a woman lawyer in Missouri, I believe in the mid to late 70's, who recalled how she was always expected to take notes and act in a secretarial capacity when in a meeting with male lawyers.

So yah, not every show has the responsibility to shoulder the burden of showcasing everything wrong with society in its respective time period, and so far, I think Agent Carter has done a fine job dealing with the problems relative to her.

Meanwhile, others aren't very happy with how the show is dealing with sexism, "Stop Calling 'Agent Carter' a Feminist Triumph."
posted by Atreides at 8:33 AM on January 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


I'd prefer not to frame my critique in terms of what the show is or isn't responsible for depicting. Rather, I see it as an issue of how deftly the creators are able to use the medium to depict life as it was in the late '40s and create a vivid, realistic (or at least comic book realistic) world. Again, they do a great job of exploring the vagaries of gender politics , but when the vivid and uncomfortable depiction of sexism in the workplace gives way to a comic beat centered on police violence, I start to feel that the world they are creating is less vivid, less compelling.
posted by The White Hat at 9:21 AM on January 8, 2015


As with any period show, I would like to see more diversity in general and realistic portrayals of same. Cool to make the nightclub fence a black guy, and to have Peggy honeytrap him without comment, but the reality is that New York in 1946 was a fairly diverse place and it would be interesting to see more than a one-off character here or there be non-white.

I'm also curious about how the treatment of Souza shakes out because he's clearly vaguely "ethnic" on some level.
posted by Sara C. at 9:54 AM on January 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


OMG OMG OMG Said nightclub fence guy is Bubbles from "The Wire".
posted by Sara C. at 11:52 AM on January 8, 2015


Yeah, was disappointed that the bubble was popped, so it won't be an ongoing character.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 11:53 AM on January 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


I can't be the only one seeing femslash everywhere here, right?

My partner and I were immediately pairing Peggy and Colleen. This made us much more invested in her death. Now there's Angie...

Ha, there are already 10 stories in Peggy Carter/Angie Martinelli on AO3. People work fast.
posted by vibratory manner of working at 11:59 AM on January 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


LADY'S RESIDENT HOTEL.

I mean come on it's like they're ASKING US.
posted by The Whelk at 12:03 PM on January 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


My partner and I were immediately pairing Peggy and Colleen.

Well... there is only one bed in that apartment. And it's a Murphy. Those sag in the middle, so you kind of roll together...
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 6:51 PM on January 8, 2015


Shea Whigham is a great addition to the cast, and he gets to flex his comic chops. He's too good to let be a sourpuss all day long.
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 7:30 PM on January 8, 2015


Cool to make the nightclub fence a black guy, and to have Peggy honeytrap him without comment, but the reality is that New York in 1946 was a fairly diverse place and it would be interesting to see more than a one-off character here or there be non-white.

Yeah, especially considering that the one black guy is a criminal with a penchant specifically blonde women - not exactly the most progressive role.

My issue with the sexism was more that it was just so easy to toss it aside - all the sexists were obvious incompetent oafs. And then you get all the jokes about Howard Stark's womanizing, and it's not seen as connected at all. (Do I think it's possible to sleep with a lot of women, respect all of them, and have the attention be only given to those who would appreciate it all the time? Of course. Do I think that the sexual politics of the era and women's limited 'proper' responses make it a lot less likely in 1946? Also yes). It just felt really broad.
posted by dinty_moore at 7:41 PM on January 8, 2015


I don't know if it's really worth worrying about who's a criminal or whatever on a show that is presumably going to be dealing with plenty of underworld types and baddies. You can't really have a diverse show if you're only willing to cast minorities as saints, and I think that type of logic is ultimately why a lot of shows decide to not court controversy by just having an all-white cast. Or like "look the scientist is Asian!" or whatever.

(I have the same problem with the idea that Colleen was "fridged". I mean she's a minor character on an action/adventure show. If we decide that no woman can ever be killed, or it's "fridging" and thus sexist, pretty soon there won't be any women on TV.)

I would like to see a non-white SSR agent, however. If Peggy exists, there must be other people there who are not white guys.
posted by Sara C. at 7:47 PM on January 8, 2015


I mean that black criminal who gets handsy with those white (blonde) women is a very specific horrible stereotype that maybe it'd be a good idea to stay away from. If a) Bubs wasn't the only black dude and b) they didn't specify it was blondes*, I wouldn't have really thought much of it.

* Or really, cast Bubs as nearly anyone else on the show, since I understand the narrative wish to have the Peggy as a blonde in that scene.
posted by dinty_moore at 7:53 PM on January 8, 2015


If we're going to say the level of sexism is true to the time and shrug at it (and I am not saying we shouldn't) then I'm not sure the same isn't true of beating a suspect.
posted by phearlez at 8:05 PM on January 8, 2015


I would like to see a non-white SSR agent, however. If Peggy exists, there must be other people there who are not white guys.


Well, it's hardly surprising that the SSR is a whitebread boyzone.

True, the UK did actually have female intelligence agents during World War 2. I don't think that the US did, although I'm happy to be corrected.

Re race, for example, black Americans who fought in World War 2 did so almost exclusively in segregated units - desegregation in the US military didn't occur until 1948.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 8:21 PM on January 8, 2015


And frankly I don't think the sexism was overplayed. It's the kind of thing that just was in the atmosphere, and stayed there for a really long time (and is still there in some places), well into the 80s. A lot of women got used to it and learned to deal with it, but just because you got used to it didn't mean all those little micro-aggressions weren't there.

I don't either. Peggy puts me in mind of the famed White Mouse, the super badass Australian female intelligence agent of World War 2 vintage. Amongst her many frankly amazing anecdotes (taken from wikipedia):
On the night of 29/30 April 1944, Wake was parachuted into the Auvergne, becoming a liaison between London and the local maquis group headed by Captain Henri Tardivat in the Forest of Tronçais. Upon discovering her tangled in a tree, Captain Tardivat greeted her remarking, "I hope that all the trees in France bear such beautiful fruit this year," to which she replied, "Don't give me that French shit."
...
Wake described her tactics: "A little powder and a little drink on the way, and I'd pass their (German) posts and wink and say, 'Do you want to search me?' God, what a flirtatious little bastard I was."
Working with the French resistance, she caused enough havoc that the Gestapo put a 5 million franc price on her head in 1943. And she still had to deal with casual sexism.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 8:33 PM on January 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


But in the MCU, Gabe Jones was a member of the Howling Commandos, and he was black. I'm actually fascinated by the implications of Cap's Howling Commandos on the history of the MCU, because they were a pretty diverse group of men: a black man (Gabe Jones), a Japanese-American man (Jim Morita), a member of the French Resistance (Jacques Dernier), a British soldier (don't recall what branch of service Monty Falsworth was supposed to be from), and two other American soldiers (Bucky Barnes and Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan). And Peggy is a woman of course, one who was in a pretty critical support role for their unit. I wonder if this is a bit of Cap's legacy that we'll see the SSR grappling with in Agent Carter. If an integrated unit was good enough for Captain America, why wouldn't it be good enough for the rest of the armed services? Did the Howling Commandos spur any social change?

Anyway, my point is, we could (and should!) totally see Gabe Jones as part of the SSR in Agent Carter, because according to his grandson Trip in Agents of SHIELD, he was involved with the SSR after the war.
posted by yasaman at 8:41 PM on January 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


"You can't really have a diverse show if you're only willing to cast minorities as saints villains."
FTFY

There are zero black actors (with speaking parts) who aren't baddies. I'm pretty sure "black men must be saints" isn't why Hollywood won't wrote great non-villain roles for them. Carter's snide dick joke at him wasn't cool or necessary. There's a fuckton of nasty cultural baggage in that joke.

I'm looking forward to hijinks in the hotel. Furnished and continental breakfast!
posted by Ik ben afgesneden at 8:42 PM on January 8, 2015


There are zero black actors (with speaking parts) who aren't baddies. I'm pretty sure "black men must be saints" isn't why Hollywood won't wrote great non-villain roles for them.

It's only the first two episodes. Give them a little space. I normally wouldn't be this forgiving, but Agents of Shield is actually pretty good on diversity, and that didn't happen by accident.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 9:00 PM on January 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


Is Andre Royo's character really a "villain", per se? He's just a nightclub owner who does a little side business as a fence. Which is the kind of character we're going to be seeing a lot of in a series like this.

Is anyone on this show really "good" aside from possibly Peggy Carter herself? And maybe the Howling Commandos if they show up? And possibly Jarvis?
posted by Sara C. at 9:42 PM on January 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


Is Andre Royo's character really a "villain", per se? He's just a nightclub owner who does a little side business as a fence.

Well, he's selling stolen WMDs on the black market so, yeah, he's a villain.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 10:06 PM on January 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


It would be really neat if the show managed to tell (what seems like) an awesome action/spy story without a romance angle ... but if they do, I really hope it is Sousa. Enver Gjokaj was great in Dollhouse and deserves more exposure that a romance type sub-plot would bring.

From Winter Soldier, I believe Agent Carter has a line about how Steve changed her life in so many ways including rescuing unit blahblah from somewhere, which had her future husband. Sousa served in Europe and he/his unit(?) was captured, so that might be a clue drop.
posted by humans are superior! at 12:55 AM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm still hoping for Peggy Carter/Gabe Jones in the MCU. Though I'm also okay with them getting together long after this series ends.
posted by dinty_moore at 4:06 AM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm hoping for a Peggy/Sousa/Angie threesome with BDSM that alternates between CMNF and CWNM while taking advantage of the LEO/MFIC dynamic.

But that's just me.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 6:07 AM on January 9, 2015 [3 favorites]


It's only the first two episodes. Give them a little space. I normally wouldn't be this forgiving, but Agents of Shield is actually pretty good on diversity, and that didn't happen by accident.

I think it's probably more that they're better than (dismal) average, but only kinda, and that took a goodly amount of S1 to happen. Whedon's better on gender equity than racial diversity. Personally I am more than willing to accept the concept that a lot of these shitty people would be happy to use women in construction and PoC in authority for as long as they absolutely had to, then go back to the old ways and pretending it never happened.

That's not necessarily what I want to see in entertainment, but as a reflection of attitudes I find it very believable. I'm sympathetic to the challenge in a lot of entertainment; while the "oh that's how it was" is often a BS smokescreen there certainly are challenges based on setting and, as said above, this isn't really an ensemble show when you look at who gets screen time. They could have one of the three stooges be a PoC but then you have to cope with the question of why they'll be accepting there but not of a woman.

I have the same problem with the idea that Colleen was "fridged". I mean she's a minor character on an action/adventure show. If we decide that no woman can ever be killed, or it's "fridging" and thus sexist, pretty soon there won't be any women on TV.

Obviously definitions like this lack the OED treatment, but for me I think the sensible definition of "being fridged" is a character - usually a romantic partner with few defining characteristics - who is only used (or is eventually reduced) to provide a source of angst/motivation for a male hero. Colleen sorta straddles the line since she's got no job beyond causing Carter pain, but I think there's a few differentiators. She's not a romantic partner by any indication (encouraging Carter to date) and Carter has a pre-existing issue with entanglements. Plus she's not just killed for proximity to Carter - it's possible that part of why the assassin kills her is that he thinks SHE'S the blonde in question, seeing her only in bed.

I am tired of the lazy push-people-away plotlines, but the collateral damage of the people around the pulp hero doesn't bother me much. I think it's clearly a trope Carter is playing with, though she has yet to arrive at a scene and find someone has beat her to it and there's just bodies around. I thought we might see that in this episode but it turned out the killer was following a parallel trail to the same destination. Carter's coworkers seem to be ending up on the receiving end of this trend instead.
posted by phearlez at 7:57 AM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


She's not a romantic partner by any indication (encouraging Carter to date)...

Check your binary privilege! Maybe they had an open relationship.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 8:44 AM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


I realize your comment is not serious, but I want to note that this is not what 'binary privilege' customarily refers to.
posted by vibratory manner of working at 4:30 PM on January 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


Yeah, these two episodes have been a lot of fun. Exciting and witty. Good stuff. That said, does the pacing/editing seem really off at times to anyone else? Not bad off necessarily, but odd. It's hard to describe. Certain moments are held longer than you would generally expect (and the reverse).

I'm no physicist, but if the bombs had actually blown up an oil refinery and then scrunched all the bits into a 50-foot ball, that wouldn't be the sort of thing you could just load onto a truck and then pry apart with crowbars. You'd barely be able to move it just because of the mass alone.

I kept expecting the truck to collapse or break in half or something. Comedically. I feel that was a lost opportunity.
posted by brundlefly at 1:09 AM on January 10, 2015


The 8-episode season, lowish budget (compared to, e.g., Agents of SHIELD), and two English leads make this feel like a lot like a British show. In a good way.

It was nice to get a few lighter moments in this episode, like Carter's interview at the Griffith Hotel.
posted by mbrubeck at 11:51 AM on January 10, 2015 [2 favorites]


The music was a bit much and the incredible strong flatbed truck was annoying, but otherwise enjoyable.
posted by entropicamericana at 3:10 PM on January 12, 2015


mbrubeck - yeah, there's a lot that reminds me of Foyle's War here. The tone is much more "comic book" (in fact I'd argue that Agent Carter nails the comic book tone/aesthetic more than any other MCU property with the exception maybe of Guardians Of The Galaxy), but it really is like a punched up BBC thing.
posted by Sara C. at 3:13 PM on January 12, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm not convinced you can stand on the top of a moving van while wearing high heels. Maybe they had extra grip. Like golf cleat high heels.
posted by small_ruminant at 11:14 PM on January 16, 2015


I don't think that Whitby's Prospect has more chance than any other horse in that race when you consider that they all have exactly the same form (with a little bit of a shuffle here and there).
posted by unliteral at 5:31 PM on January 22, 2015


« Older Agent Carter: Now is Not the E...   |  Podcast: 99% Invisible: 147- P... Newer »

You are not logged in, either login or create an account to post comments