Better Call Saul: Carrot and Stick
April 19, 2022 2:18 PM - Season 6, Episode 2 - Subscribe

Harsh realities dawn on Nacho. Gus investigates his suspicions.
posted by chill (55 comments total)
 
My head is spinning a bit after the second episode. So many possibilities yet still so much ground to cover before we get involved with Walter White. I don’t know how they’re going to pull it off but I’ve no doubt they will.
I really enjoyed “stick” Kim in action. I want to see more of her. I’m guessing that’s someone from Clifford Main tailing them at the end, following up on his suspicions?
posted by chill at 2:23 PM on April 19


Why are these separate? AMC showed both as 1 long episode.
posted by fiercekitten at 2:43 PM on April 19


In the rest of the world they are two separate episodes on Netflix. People were putting spoilers for episode 2 in the episode 1 thread.
posted by chill at 2:52 PM on April 19 [4 favorites]


In syndication, it needs to be two shows.
posted by QuakerMel at 4:05 PM on April 19


I’m guessing that’s someone from Clifford Main tailing them at the end, following up on his suspicions?

That was Howard's "NAMASTE" license plate, wasn't it?
posted by We had a deal, Kyle at 5:12 PM on April 19


I’m guessing that’s someone from Clifford Main tailing them at the end, following up on his suspicions?

I thought it was Lalo, but I can't remember if we saw Lalo after he took the coyotes truck. He did tell Hector that he'd see him soon.

I loved the tense standoff right before Nacho gets through to Mike. The way Jonathan Banks drawls that this won't go down the way they think it will is so convincing. Because Mike continues working with Fring, I have a tiny hope that Nacho will escape.
posted by gladly at 6:02 PM on April 19 [1 favorite]


When Kim was sitting there next to the phone I was like "Kim is about to kick their ass in one second" and then a second later she was like "Okay." I was cracking up. And then when she was done when Jimmy was like holy shit. Kim is so inspiring. I love her so much. I think she thinks she's going to fund her pro bono business with full time grifting. That'll be my fan fic anyway.
posted by bleep at 6:49 PM on April 19 [4 favorites]


Why did Gus try to make Mike bring Nacho's dad down to the chicken farm? Nacho's dad doesn't know anything, so he has no info to give up to Gus or the Salamancas. My first thought was Gus wanted him as a hostage to make Nacho turn himself in to the Salamancas, but that doesn't make any sense because then Nacho might give them (willingly or not) the proof that ties the attack on Lalo back to Gus. And Nacho has no guarantee that the Salamancas wouldn't come after his dad anyway after they kill Nacho, just to make a point. And based on the way Gus asked and Mike reacted, it didn't seem like they wanted to bring him down there to keep him safe. So what's the angle?

I thought it was Lalo, but I can't remember if we saw Lalo after he took the coyotes truck.

Lalo doesn't take the truck. He turns back the way he came, I assume to join the hunt for Nacho (and proof that Gus came after him).
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 8:21 PM on April 19


Let's just take a moment to appreciate how supremely scummy the Kettlemans are--their first tax-return-fraud victim looks really familiar, I feel like I've seen him in something else--and their trailer office reminds me of the one in Peacemaker.

Why did Gus try to make Mike bring Nacho's dad down to the chicken farm?

As bait for Nacho, whom they very likely just want to kill so that the Salamancas don't learn the truth.
posted by Halloween Jack at 9:07 PM on April 19 [2 favorites]


I think Gus is trying to turn over Nacho as the guy who did it to maintain his own innocence, and use his father to force him to comply. Mike doesn't like it but Mike doesn't know what Hector told Gus with his face when he shook his hand. I thought that was what was happening when Don Juan was looking through the phony (unopened) safe that Mike had made & planted with Nacho's information & current location.
posted by bleep at 9:38 PM on April 19 [1 favorite]


Also, something that I just found out existed: "No Picnic" with the Kettlemans, which was on AMC's site at one point.
posted by Halloween Jack at 9:49 PM on April 19 [4 favorites]


I love how the two teams attacking the safe represented the two styles of crime:

Fring's precision and cleanliness versus Team Salamanca's brute force tactics. Leaving a clean apartment vs. the toss, the drill vs. the saw. I love how much characterization they manage through "show don't tell" actions like these. It's not necessary at this point to establish character, really, but it's a good sign that characterization is still on everyone's mind.

It's easy to see how Fring could get taken in by Walter -- who seems at first to be a very calculating and thoughtful individual, but who turns out to be a reactionary and ungovernable force of chaos once let into the game.
posted by absalom at 9:49 PM on April 19 [10 favorites]


When Kim was sitting there next to the phone I was like "Kim is about to kick their ass in one second" and then a second later she was like "Okay." I was cracking up. And then when she was done when Jimmy was like holy shit. Kim is so inspiring. I love her so much. I think she thinks she's going to fund her pro bono business with full time grifting. That'll be my fan fic anyway.

It turns out Kim is a more effective and dangerous hustler than Jimmy and you found that inspiring ? Why ?
posted by Pendragon at 10:53 PM on April 19


Im loving this trend of Jimmy being less enthusiastic than Kim. Danger lies ahead.

I am extremely confused about the cartel plot. Mike wants to save Nacho, but plants a letter giving his location away. And why does Gus want the Salamancas to find Nacho? Nacho represents the only proof that Gus did it (although Lalo seems to think otherwise). My only guess was Gus' plan was for Nacho to die while being caught, but that seems too risky.

And yeah, I dont see the point of taking Nacho's dad anyway? Nacho isn't going to know.

For a show that has always been extremely meticulous about explaining itself, I'm just quite confused at the moment
posted by Cannon Fodder at 11:14 PM on April 19 [1 favorite]


It turns out Kim is a more effective and dangerous hustler than Jimmy and you found that inspiring ? Why ?
Because she's really good at taking bad people down a peg by pointing out their own bad actions & she does it with style, I mean what's not to love.


Mike wants to go get Nacho but he had to follow his boss's orders. Until he drew a line at involving the dad. Who we remember, Mike met & respects.
posted by bleep at 11:45 PM on April 19 [3 favorites]


That was Howard's "NAMASTE" license plate, wasn't it?
I couldn’t read the plate, but I don’t think so and it was a different car to the one that had Namaste plates in the first episode at the golf club.
posted by chill at 11:58 PM on April 19 [1 favorite]


The podcasts for the first two episodes are finally out so hopefully they will clear up any minor confusion over certain plot points!
posted by chill at 12:00 AM on April 20


The plates did not say NAMAST3. At a guess I'd say they're ELD-93C, but probably entirely irrelevant.

It may be too soon for him to reappear north of the border, but at first guess I think it's Lalo.

Also I love the Kettlemans. They're the best.
posted by dumbland at 1:39 AM on April 20


I noticed Mike pocketed the fake driver's license that had Nacho's father's picture on it. I'm wondering if Mike is going to help Nacho's dad get away, given that he is a totally innocent party in all of this, and Mike has a strong sense of right and wrong. I'm also guessing Mike didn't know the letter he planted in Nacho's safe gave away details of the motel.

I was puzzled by something though. Fring was given confirmation that Lalo was dead via dental records. If Lalo had somehow managed to plant the body of the lookalike goat man at the scene (presumably sufficiently disfigured enough to make people think it was Lalo), how were the dental records swapped or faked?

The Kettleman scenes were perfection.
posted by essexjan at 4:37 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


"Fring was given confirmation that Lalo was dead via dental records"

There was a line about Lalo providing a dentist to some of those people in the village. I guess he either collaborated with the dentist, or simply faked the records for some reason in the past.

I still can't understand why Fring wanted the Salamancas to know where Nacho was; why not just kill him?
posted by Cannon Fodder at 4:43 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


essexjan: I think that the whole scene with the goat-herder was a flashback? Lalo paid for that guy's dental work so that his teeth would be exact duplicates of his in the event that he ever needed a body double. And maybe he knew Nacho was going to double cross him, and brought goat-guy to his compound (dead or alive) in anticipation of faking his death. I'm certainly hoping for more clarity, too.
posted by QuakerMel at 6:09 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


I think some of the confusion about Fring and Nacho can be cleared up by leaning on the show's themes. Fring clearly wants Nacho dead or neutralized. Fring is also a master planner and this show never has him do the straightforward thing. So we've been shown some pieces; Fring's got someone watching Nacho, Fring's talked to Hector about Nacho, Fring's considering using Nacho's dad as leverage somehow. I feel confident that the writers will pay all this off in the next episode or two, Fring's plan will make sense. It's fun to speculate exactly what will happen but given the writers' love of complex surprises I'm hopeful it will be something more interesting than I can anticipate.

As for why Mike helped compromise Nacho by putting the note in the safe.. I take that as one more example of Mike's ambiguity. He's constantly doing awful things that he knows are bad out of some sense of obligation or loyalty to an employer. Then he regrets it and tries to undo it or mitigate the damage. We had a whole season of Mike doing this with Werner Ziegler, it's the central conflict in Mike's character. Now he's doing it with Nacho, still working for Fring despite not liking what Fring is doing.

One thing bugging me a bit about the show, or maybe how we're discussing it... I'm very interested in the complex Salamanca / Fring / Nacho / Mike story. I'm much less interested in Saul and Kim now. And the two stories have largely decoupled, although I suspect the writers will bring them back together before we're done this season. Better Call Saul started out as the lighter, funnier version of Breaking Bad and Slippin' Jimmy was the center of that. But over the seasons the show has introduced more complex and dark stories with Nacho. Kim's plot to frame Howard feels awfully low stakes compared to the other story.
posted by Nelson at 7:36 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


I think the stories of Jimmy et al and Nacho et al have essentially been running largely separately since season 2, from which point on I’ve always felt like I’m watching two shows in the same universe simultaneously with different tones and flicking between them.
That’s my recollection anyway, it would be interesting to do a re-watch of the whole lot.
posted by chill at 8:15 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


It turns out Kim is a more effective and dangerous hustler than Jimmy and you found that inspiring ? Why ?

I love Kim too, even now. I think part of it is Rhea Seehorn's acting, and part of it is how rare it still is to encounter a show that has an unflappable, hypercompetent character who takes no shit who is also a woman and never frames that combination as bitchy, ever. And that is so novel and thrilling to me that whether Kim is applying all of those qualities to breaking bad or to fighting unfairly harsh sentencing I still love to watch her in action.

I know BB and BCS take place in a moral universe, and I know that these choices cannot end well for Kim. And that breaks my heart in a way that, say, Walter's choices never did. But whatever comeuppance the universe serves up to Kim, it will be because of what she did, not because of who she is. I trust BCS enough at this point to expect that the outcome will not be "This is what happens to women who don't behave" but "This is what happens to people who make bad moral choices."
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 9:00 AM on April 20 [8 favorites]


I think that the whole scene with the goat-herder was a flashback?

I'm not sure it is though? In that scene Lalo has a leg injury from the attack on his home; and the scene ends with him gripping the scissor like a dagger in an "oh, he's going to kill them now" way.

I totally didn't realize that Lalo's "keep the soul patch" comment to the goatherder was to provide Lalo with a body that had convincingly Lalo-esque facial hair; nor this:

Lalo paid for that guy's dental work so that his teeth would be exact duplicates of his in the event that he ever needed a body double.

Dentistry doesn't work like that though? although maybe in BCS's universe it does :)

I mentioned this in a comment on Ep1 that was deleted because it accidentally referenced events from Ep2: it's annoying that the show is doing the tired old orange "this is Mexico" filter. This was particularly glaring in this scene, which is set in early morning (the repeated offer of breakfast) but for which the orange filter made it look like sunset.

I don't remember Breaking Bad doing this so egregiously? in particular my memory is that the two episodes set at Eladio's villa were both in bright, almost harsh, sunlight.
posted by We had a deal, Kyle at 10:58 AM on April 20 [1 favorite]


Yeah for me there isnt really any thematic through line at all between Mike and Jimmy's story at this point, other than perhaps an understanding that when they cross its going to be very bad for Jimmy.

It shouldnt really work. There really isnt any link between clever con work/ legal fights and a ganf war, but Ive enjoyed both immensely.
posted by Cannon Fodder at 11:01 AM on April 20


The through line between Mike & Jimmy is that Jimmy & Kimmy believe that Lalo is dead & therefore they're safe, but they're not.

Another through line we saw is that the scam that Jimmy put on to get Lalo out of jail - the fake identity, the fake family, is all being unraveled by the detective that Jimmy ran into at the courthouse. & he accidentally said "Lalo" while he was talking to them.

Another thing I love about this show is that if you're the kind of person who will sit & listen to someone else's story and you listen carefully, it will reward you. I eat it up.
posted by bleep at 11:12 AM on April 20 [6 favorites]


But whatever comeuppance the universe serves up to Kim, it will be because of what she did, not because of who she is.

She hasn't really done anything wrong yet except become a little intoxicated by Jimmy's animus against Hamlin. Every time we see her kicking someone's ass she's at the very least telling them something they need to hear or trying to give them good advice. Or, teaching them not to get financially involved with strangers at bars.

But, everyone deserves a vice and this is someone who worked her ass off her whole life and doesn't find much else that fun.
posted by bleep at 11:32 AM on April 20 [2 favorites]


As for why Mike helped compromise Nacho by putting the note in the safe.. I take that as one more example of Mike's ambiguity. He's constantly doing awful things that he knows are bad out of some sense of obligation or loyalty to an employer. Then he regrets it and tries to undo it or mitigate the damage.

It also plays into one of Mike's rare soft spots: young men who are about to die because they're abruptly in way over their heads. It's why I think Nacho is doomed; I don't think Mike would've gotten so sentimental (by Mike standards) about Jesse if he weren't sick of sacrificing young idiots to pad cartel profits.

I mentioned this in a comment on Ep1 that was deleted because it accidentally referenced events from Ep2: it's annoying that the show is doing the tired old orange "this is Mexico" filter.

Yeah I always call it the "terrorism filter." It was not as egregious as the one used when bad movies are set in the Middle East, but it did feel a little cheap by Better Call Saul standards. On the other hand, all the bits inside the hotel room with the window and shade were fantastic. When Nacho first started cowering in the window, I thought he was being paranoid. It wasn't until the third or fourth very insistent shot of the air conditioner dripping on the closed-up building that I figured out what the show was EXPLAINING LIKE THIS. (Not a criticism -- I needed the lack of subtlety to follow along.)
posted by grandiloquiet at 11:57 AM on April 20 [7 favorites]


The car following Jimmy and Kim is driven by cops wondering about the "Lalo" slip-up.

Lalo's dentist didn't have to make the dead man's dental work exactly fit Lalo's. All he has to do is give the Federales the dead man's dental x-rays when asked for Lalo's.
posted by kandinski at 3:47 PM on April 20 [16 favorites]


I wasn't sure that Jimmy saying Lalo was a slip-up. Seemed calculated; he knows well enough how dangerous Lalo is, and if he thinks he can get rid of him without implicating himself, then ...?
posted by minsies at 6:51 PM on April 20 [2 favorites]


At this point I'm watching and loving this show mostly for Kim. She's awesome and delightful -- Jimmy is just there to support her glory. The cartel machinations and gun play have become a bit tedious. Just give me more Kim.

re the letter that Mike leaves in Nacho's dummy safe: is it possible that Mike didn't know its contents, and didn't know that it was giving away Nacho's location? I can imagine Gus instructing Mike to leave the (sealed) envelope in the safe, without discussing the specific contents with Mike. Mike did seem hesitant when he left it.
posted by Corvid at 7:10 PM on April 20 [2 favorites]


I mentioned this in a comment on Ep1 that was deleted because it accidentally referenced events from Ep2: it's annoying that the show is doing the tired old orange "this is Mexico" filter

This is actually mentioned by one of the guests in the BCS Insider podcast. They are new as of S6 and literally say "I don't know why, but this is the sort of 'third world green'" filter and I thought of all the comments here.

On the positive side: "On the other hand, all the bits inside the hotel room with the window and shade were fantastic." The same person said this was a set they built from scratch, not a location shot.

TL;DR: Listen to the podcast if you are not.
posted by absalom at 9:11 PM on April 20 [1 favorite]


i'm not sure what they said on the podcast but Breaking Bad definitely used "mexico vision", going all the way back to at least the original cold open where the Cousins were introduced. it's definitely not in every scene but it happens a lot. not sure if this is the first instance of it in BCS but i don't think it is?
posted by JimBennett at 1:43 AM on April 21 [1 favorite]


Listening to the podcast now, it's a very brief mention at about 0:30:10.

Production Designer Denise Pizzini: "…and there's a certain color palette that feels more Mexican – there's what I call, you know, 'Third World Green' which is this same green that is used all over the world and I don't know why it is, but it is, so I used that…"
posted by Strutter Cane - United Planets Stilt Patrol at 3:56 AM on April 21


I hadn't realized what a cliché the yellow filter is until I started looking for info on it for this thread. Why Does ‘Yellow Filter’ Keep Popping Up in American Movies? is a good summary. The earliest example the article cites is Traffic (2000).
Oversaturated yellow tones are supposed to depict warm, tropical, dry climates. But it makes the landscape in question look jaundiced and unhealthy, adding an almost dirty or grimy sheen to the scene. Yellow filter seems to intentionally make places the West has deemed dangerous or even primitive uglier than is necessary or even appropriate.
I went looking for more info because I loved the movie Sicario. Deakins' cinematography and color grading there is fantastic and while it does use the yellow filter trope my memory is it's pretty subtle and complex, not just a simple shorthand. Deakins would go on to do similar color manipulation with director Villeneuve in Blade Runner: 2049 where it looks great and far removed from anti-Mexican stereotyping.

But I'm not sure I'd be so generous with Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul. Their color grading strikes me as a bit lazy, like they have their Mexico filter and they just use it every time the same way. The shows still look good in part because they're using movie-quality color grading for a prestige TV show. But it's certainly problematic culturally.
posted by Nelson at 8:09 AM on April 21 [4 favorites]


Yeah I’m pretty surprised by Denise’s quote posted above. Maybe she was being glib but taking that at face value .. oof. She had the choice to do better. I was giving them the benefit of the doubt but there’s not a lot of good readings expressly calling it “third world green” and saying you used it because everyone else does. A bad mark on some otherwise great storytelling.
posted by neustile at 6:40 PM on April 21 [2 favorites]


I still can't understand why Fring wanted the Salamancas to know where Nacho was; why not just kill him?

Because Nacho is part of the Salamanca cartel, and if Gus has him killed that raises all kind of questions or it starts an open war that Gus is trying to avoid. Once Lalo knows that Nacho betrayed him, if Nacho winds up dead it’ll be pretty obvious that someone did it to keep him from talking. Better to plant evidence showing Nacho taking b money from the Peruvians and hope the aftermath falls your way.
posted by Pater Aletheias at 11:24 AM on April 22 [2 favorites]


I guess, but it seems to bank a lot on Nacho keeping quiet. If the cartel finds him dead in the motel and the only evidence is a money trail, that seems better than a live Nacho who really has no reason to keep quiet for Gus
posted by Cannon Fodder at 12:11 PM on April 22


That's why Gus wants to be holding the dad hostage
posted by bleep at 1:32 PM on April 22 [2 favorites]


Nelson:
Kim's plot to frame Howard feels awfully low stakes compared to the other story.

The stakes might not be life-or-death as in the cartel story, but this plot has to do with Kim's breaking bad and her ultimate separation from Saul (and Saul's becoming who he is in BB), and that story is the raison d'etre of the show, no? I mean not to state the obvious. But it seems hugely high stakes to me, especially as we watch Jimmy's/Saul's misgivings about her plan. The reversal of Kim's bringing Jimmy (and herself) down rather than the other way around was introduced last season, and we are now seeing that play out. The cartel story, while more lethal, is a bit of a sideshow.

Also I totally agree with Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? about this
whatever comeuppance the universe serves up to Kim, it will be because of what she did, not because of who she is. I trust BCS enough at this point to expect that the outcome will not be "This is what happens to women who don't behave" but "This is what happens to people who make bad moral choices."

Being able to have that level of trust is a huge part of what makes BCS so compelling. And Kim is most definitely making some bad, dangerous moral choices, which is a fascinating development of her character. It's also a well-earned one; Kim's skirted the line so many times and shown her willingness to engage in minor cons just for the hell of it. So this isn't a surprise, even though it's a tragedy in the making.
posted by torticat at 3:18 PM on April 22 [4 favorites]


"That's why Gus wants to be holding the dad hostage"

But he planted the letter before deciding to grab the dad. And how would he even let Nacho know he has the dad when Nacho is being (presumably) tortured by the Salamancas?

Maybe this will all makes sense in a couple pf episodes but right now Im just super confused
posted by Cannon Fodder at 3:59 PM on April 22


So maybe I missed this earlier and everyone else here has seen it already, but tonight I noticed AMC+ via Amazon Prime has an “Episode 683” that is the American Greed parody episode that was available on YouTube earlier this month: American Greed: James McGill
posted by blue suede stockings at 5:06 PM on April 22


And how would he even let Nacho know he has the dad when Nacho is being (presumably) tortured by the Salamancas?
The official recap of season 5 made a point of showing the scene where Nacho tried to persuade his dad to flee for his safety, and he refused. Nacho knows that his dad's life is at risk already and would just assume that talking about Gus would seal his fate.
posted by chill at 5:24 AM on April 23 [1 favorite]


She hasn't really done anything wrong yet except become a little intoxicated by Jimmy's animus against Hamlin.

Intoxicated to the point of making Jimmy go through with a revenge plan that he's not all that into, which to me counts as "fairly wrong".
posted by oneirodynia at 7:25 PM on April 24 [1 favorite]


Jimmy is a big boy. He's making his own choices.
posted by bleep at 8:51 PM on April 24 [1 favorite]


Inflatable Lady Liberty almost deserves her own credits in this episode.

Most TV shows can be followed pretty effectively by listening along - if your attentions is half on your smartphone and half on the screen then you will still be able to catch the drift of things. I love that BCS will not work like that at all; each scene must be watched as well as listened to. The scene with Gus meeting Hector was a great example: we watch Hector's face and see every trace of his sentiments, just as Gus does, we see his slow and painful attempt towards shaking the hated Gus's hand - and we understand that is is precisely because of Hector's careful subterfuge in being friendly - that Gus knows for sure Lalo is not dead. The dialogue alone would tell you none of this.

Another through line we saw is that the scam that Jimmy put on to get Lalo out of jail - the fake identity, the fake family, is all being unraveled by the detective that Jimmy ran into at the courthouse. & he accidentally said "Lalo" while he was talking to them.

The show is going out of its way to show the complexities of subterfuge and how easy it is to slip up. Lalo's decision to call Hector to tell him he was alive (Hector who, of all people, would surely not give that away), Jimmy's obsessive refinement of the script he is going to use on the Kettleman's - and this (I would read accidental) giveaway to the detectives. A good scammer needs to not just be two or three steps ahead of their mark - they need to guard against the smallest flaw in their fabricate story that can be uncovered by an unexpected question.

Word to the wise: don't point out to your assailant that it would be suicidal to fire your noisy gun and kill you, when you happen to have your back to them.
posted by rongorongo at 6:51 AM on April 25 [3 favorites]


Jimmy is a big boy. He's making his own choices.

Yeah, I'm trying not to start blaming Kim for more than her share of strife. The trick is that I spent most of the series supposing that Kim was the good influence on Jimmy; it is now more apparent that Jimmy was the bad influence on Kim, and Kim doesn't affect Jimmy's morality either way. (I don't think he's doing anything worse to Hamlin than he's done to other people in a long life of cons; it's just weird because Jimmy has other options now. But even if ruining Hamlin's life is not personal to Jimmy anymore, it does now seem to be personal to Kim, and Jimmy is definitely a "me and mine" kind of guy.)
posted by grandiloquiet at 7:54 AM on April 25 [3 favorites]


It's true that Jimmy might be a "bad" influence on Kim but I think it's equally true that Kim is still a good influence on Jimmy. She is truly living her ideals, her sole ambition being to shepard people out of the lions den, and how many people can say they even met someone like that?
posted by bleep at 7:06 PM on April 25 [2 favorites]


Part of me -- a dark, twisted part that was formed sometime in 2020 -- is wondering if Kim is conning Jimmy right now.

As much as I love Kim and I love the Jimmy/Kim relationship, what if she is?

Jimmy was pretty much done with Howard after throwing some bowling balls at his car, but Kim has talked him into a scheme to hurt Howard more, which he was reluctant to pursue. He even said Howard "didn't deserve it."

Does Kim really want to hurt Howard that bad, just because he's a man with an ego who wants to ride in on his white horse and save her sometimes? Or is the whole thing just to get the Sandpiper case settled and $2 million for Jimmy?

Jimmy, who she just talked into marrying her. In New Mexico which is a community property state. And Kim is way smarter than Jimmy and has a past as a con artist.

We've all been thinking the obvious thing would be that Kim dies and causes Jimmy's final slide, but what if she runs off with half of his millions? Or all of it?

I hope I'm wrong but it seems like just the thing to turn Jimmy into the sad, desperate, misogynist character from Breaking Bad.
posted by mmoncur at 7:38 PM on April 25 [12 favorites]


Pete Peppers has been watching Season 6 episodes 1 and 2 in a lot more detail than I have.
Included are some interesting details from the episode 1 cold open: the objects being confiscated and sifted through include many souvenirs taken from earlier in the BCS storyline.

Some mentions about colour grading above - but I don't think we can talk about colour in these episodes without mentioning the opening shot of Jimmy's ties (first the monochrome ones then the gaudier examples) cascading into a white bin to the accompaniement of the string section of Andy William's The Days of Wine and Roses - kudos to whoever put that one together.
posted by rongorongo at 10:47 PM on April 25


She hasn't really done anything wrong yet

Are you joshing us?!?! She's done enough with the Huel Babbinaeux scam in previous seasons to be disbarred, at the bare minimum. She knows that Jimmy brought 7 million in cartel money to get a cartel member out on bond. She could easily be charged with multiple crimes, I'm sure. Unfortunately this show is scarier than that kind of outcome.
posted by tiny frying pan at 12:08 PM on April 26 [2 favorites]


The show is going out of its way to show the complexities of subterfuge and how easy it is to slip up. Lalo's decision to call Hector to tell him he was alive (Hector who, of all people, would surely not give that away), Jimmy's obsessive refinement of the script he is going to use on the Kettleman's - and this (I would read accidental) giveaway to the detectives.

Just to add to that, Kim caused the Kettlemans to shit their pants by driving home to them the adage "don't try to bullshit a bullshitter."

Part of her call to the IRS pointed out to them that their tax return scam was one of the oldest plays in the book - who did the Kettleman's think they were fooling?

To riff on Chuck's assessment of Jimmy-as-a-lawyer being "a chimp with a machine gun," they realized in a flash that Kim is a fox with a sniper rifle.

Betsy and Craig were sure they could withstand Jimmy/Saul's spray-and-pray tactics. Then they saw Kim silhouetted on high ground, ready to pick them off at will.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 7:46 AM on April 28 [3 favorites]


Does Kim really want to hurt Howard that bad, just because he's a man with an ego who wants to ride in on his white horse and save her sometimes?

Or for repeatedly sending her to the cornfield for things Jimmy did, even after she brought in Mesa Verde as a client. (Which they should've made her a partner for, at least the way the law firms work in the series.) And for trying to publicly humiliate her in front of Mesa Verde.
posted by kirkaracha at 8:02 PM on May 3 [2 favorites]


My thought on Lalo's dentistry is that he sends the goatherd to get his teeth fixed and just present's Lalo's insurane card or whatever. Then the dentist thinks it's Lalo, and Lalo actually goes and gets his teeth done under the de Guzman name (or whatever). No need for perfect teeth copies, and the dentist is in on the con without even knowing it.
posted by kaibutsu at 5:16 PM on July 23 [1 favorite]


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