Posts in the Books category.
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September 16

Book: Wanderers

Shana wakes up one morning to discover her little sister in the grip of a strange malady. She appears to be sleepwalking. She cannot talk and cannot be woken up. And she is heading with inexorable determination to a destination that only she knows. But Shana and are sister are not alone. Soon they are joined by a flock of sleepwalkers from across America, on the same mysterious journey. And like Shana, there are other “shepherds” who follow the flock to protect their friends and family on the long dark road ahead. [more inside]
posted by fifteen schnitzengruben is my limit at 10:26 PM - 2 comments

Book: The Woman Upstairs

Told with urgency, intimacy, and piercing emotion, this New York Times bestselling novel is the riveting confession of a woman awakened, transformed, and abandoned by a desire for a world beyond her own. Nora Eldridge is a reliable, but unremarkable, friend and neighbor, always on the fringe of other people’s achievements. But the arrival of the Shahid family—dashing Skandar, a Lebanese scholar, glamorous Sirena, an Italian artist, and their son, Reza—draws her into a complex and exciting new... [more inside]
posted by bunderful at 10:18 AM - 2 comments

September 15

Book: Beyond Birds and Bees

Down to earth and up to the minute with our profound new cultural conversations about gender, sex, power, autonomy, diversity, and consent, Rough's careful research and engaging storytelling illuminate a forward path for a groundbreaking generation of Americans who want clear examples and actionable steps for how to support children's sexual development--and overall wellbeing--from birth onward at home, in schools, and across our evolving culture. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 11:38 AM - 0 comments

September 12

Book: Anne of Avonlea

In which Our Heroine has matured into a “tall, slim girl, “half-past sixteen,” with serious gray eyes and hair which her friends called auburn”; LLM introduces 2 more characters, Davy and Paul Irving, in order to keep the supply of disasters and whimsy steady; the Avonlea Village Improvement Society achieves variable success; a romantic subplot is resolved; a number of spinsters are met. [more inside]
posted by bq at 9:05 PM - 7 comments

September 11

Book: Nonviolent Communication

NVC teaches you how to speak your truth or share your perspective in a way that is most likely to lead to harmony than conflict. And it teaches you how to be in the face of uncomfortable statements — like blame, judgment, criticism, or a verbal attack — and listen for the values and needs behind the statement. As a result you are less defensive, are able to stand in a more compassionate place, and are much more likely to defuse any potential conflict. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 12:57 PM - 1 comment

Book: Gideon the Ninth

The Emperor needs necromancers. The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman. Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead bullshit. [more inside]
posted by WidgetAlley at 11:14 AM - 6 comments

September 10

Book: The Testaments

More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on power, but there are signs it is beginning to rot from within. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 11:57 AM - 20 comments

Book: L'élixir d'amour

"L'amour relève-t-il d'un processus chimique ou d'un miracle spirituel ? Existe-t-il un moyen infaillible pour déclencher la passion, comme l'élixir qui jadis unit Tristan et Iseult ? Est-on, au contraire, totalement libre d'aimer ?" Anciens amants, Adam et Louise vivent désormais à des milliers de kilomètres l'un de l'autre, lui à Paris, elle à Montréal. Par lettres, tout en évoquant les blessures du passé et en s'avouant leurs nouvelles aventures, ils se lancent un défi : provoquer l'amour.... [more inside]
posted by NathalieBou at 10:14 AM - 0 comments

September 9

Book: Double Entry

Filled with colorful characters and history, Double Entry takes us from the ancient origins of accounting in Mesopotamia to the frontiers of modern finance. At the heart of the story is double-entry bookkeeping: the first system that allowed merchants to actually measure the worth of their businesses. Luca Pacioli―monk, mathematician, alchemist, and friend of Leonardo da Vinci―incorporated Arabic mathematics to formulate a system that could work across all trades and nations. As Jane Gleeson-White reveals, double-entry accounting was nothing short of revolutionary: it fueled the Renaissance, enabled capitalism to flourish, and created the global economy. John Maynard Keynes would use it to calculate GDP, the measure of a nation’s wealth. Yet double-entry accounting has had its failures. With the costs of sudden corporate collapses such as Enron and Lehman Brothers, and its disregard of environmental and human costs, the time may have come to re-create it for the future.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 9:59 AM - 1 comment

September 8

Book: To Be Taught, If Fortunate

A stand-alone science fiction novella from Becky Chambers, the author of the Wayfarers series. Like her other books, it's an intimate, character based story. No concrete antagonists, some tech, a simpld, quiet and thoughtful space opera.
posted by signal at 6:07 PM - 3 comments

September 7

Book: Spice

Explore the world's best spices, be inspired to make your own new spice blends, and take your cooking to new heights. Break new ground with this spice book like no other, from food scientist and bestselling author Dr. Stuart Farrimond. Taking the periodic table of spices as a starting point, explore the science behind the art of making incredible spice blends and how the flavor compounds within spices work together to create exciting layers of flavor and new sensations.
[more inside]
posted by aniola at 2:11 PM - 0 comments

September 5

Book: Dhalgren

A young half–Native American known as the Kid has hitchhiked from Mexico to the midwestern city Bellona—only something is wrong there . . . In Bellona, the shattered city, a nameless cataclysm has left reality unhinged. Into this desperate metropolis steps the Kid, his fist wrapped in razor-sharp knives, to write, to love, to wound.   So... [more inside]
posted by Meatbomb at 9:44 PM - 41 comments

September 4

Book: Descartes' Bones

Sixteen years after René Descartes' death in Stockholm in 1650, a pious French ambassador exhumed the remains of the controversial philosopher to transport them back to Paris. Thus began a 350-year saga that saw Descartes' bones traverse a continent, passing between kings, philosophers, poets, and painters. But as Russell Shorto shows in this deeply engaging book, Descartes' bones also played a role in some of the most momentous episodes in history, which are also part of the philosopher's metaphorical remains: the birth of science, the rise of democracy, and the earliest debates between reason and faith. Descartes' Bones is a flesh-and-blood story about the battle between religion and rationalism that rages to this day.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 10:48 PM - 1 comment

September 1

Book: Fishing

In this history of fishing—not as sport but as sustenance—archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis. Where agriculture encouraged stability, fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food—lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting—for traders, travelers, and conquering armies. This history of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show readers how fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 9:32 AM - 3 comments

August 27

Book: Anne of Green Gables

The cherished favorite featuring everyone's favorite red-headed orphan, Anne With an E. Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression.
posted by bq at 9:34 AM - 70 comments

August 26

Book: My Sister Rosa

17 year old Australian Che Taylor just got relocated to NYC (by way of Asia) by his hippie pacifist parents. He’s a boxer that isn’t allowed to spar, a 17-year old boy desperately in need of a girlfriend, and he’d really rather be back home in Sydney. But all of that pares in comparison to his real problem. He is pretty sure his 10 year old sister Rosa is a psychopath that will kill somebody sooner rather than later. The parents are totally disconnected, or so he thinks, so he takes it on himself to try to protect the world from his sister, while at the same time trying to lead a normal 17-year old’s life. That is the set up for the totally engrossing novel. It’s a suspenseful, downright creepy psychological thriller that manages to address the nature of psychopathic behavior (nature vs. nurture), parenting, teenage relationships, religion, gender identity, and class differences, all within the framework of a totally entertaining novel that will keep you up late trying to finish the book.
posted by COD at 3:54 PM - 1 comment

August 24

Book: The Vineyard at the End of the World

As wine connoisseurs know, Argentine wine was once famously bad. The grapes were overwatered, harvested in brutal heat, fermented in enormous cement pools, aged in antiquated oak vats, and then watered down and adulterated. The final product was industrial plonk, drinkable only on ice. But in 2001, a Cabernet Sauvignon / Malbec blend beat Napa and Bordeaux’s finest in a blind taste test. Suddenly, Argentina emerged as a premier wine region with a champion varietal―what best-selling author Benjamin Wallace calls “the humble Malbec.” How did this happen? [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 1:09 PM - 2 comments

August 20

Book: The Dazzle of Day

Leaving a dilapidated Earth behind, Quakers across the globe pool funds and resources as they select colonists to send to a newly discovered planet to start life anew in this “miraculous fusion of…science fiction with unsparing realism and keen psychology” (Ursula K. Le Guin).
posted by kalimac at 2:26 PM - 4 comments

August 17

Book: Butter

After traveling across three continents to stalk the modern story of butter, award-winning food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova serves up a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself. From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. With tales about the ancient butter bogs of Ireland, the pleasure dairies of France, and the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Khosrova details butter’s role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, and even spirituality and art. Readers will also find the essential collection of core butter recipes, including beurre manié, croissants, pâte brisée, and the only buttercream frosting anyone will ever need, as well as practical how-tos for making various types of butter at home--or shopping for the best.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 9:51 AM - 1 comment

Book: Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

"Why is the land so important to Cassie's family? It takes the events of one turbulent year—the year of the night riders and the burnings, the year a white girl humiliates Cassie in public simply because she's black—to show Cassie that having a place of their own is the Logan family's lifeblood. It is the land that gives the Logans their courage and pride—no matter how others may degrade them, the Logans possess something no one can take away." [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura at 6:40 AM - 5 comments

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