Posts in the Books category.
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July 14

Book: America Inc.

A corporation is running for president. And that’s the good guys. Start with The Revolution, Brought to You by Nike, by Mefi's Own andrhia (a/k/a Andrea Phillips). Take a little detour into this follow-up essay. Then crack open America Inc., a novel of democracy and dirty tricks.
posted by Etrigan at 6:37 AM - 1 comment

Book: The Empire of Gold

The final installment of the Daevabad Trilogy picks up exactly where the last book left off. Nahri and Ali surface on the Nile while Manizheh and Dara now have control of Daevabad. [more inside]
posted by miss-lapin at 4:40 AM - 0 comments

July 3

Book: Middlegame

Meet Roger. Skilled with words, languages come easily to him. He instinctively understands how the world works through the power of story. Meet Dodger, his twin. Numbers are her world, her obsession, her everything. All she understands, she does so through the power of math. Roger and Dodger aren’t exactly human, though they don’t realise it. They aren’t exactly gods, either. Not entirely. Not yet. Godhood is attainable. Pray it isn’t attained.
posted by dinty_moore at 3:34 PM - 5 comments

June 30

Book: How to Be an Antiracist

Ibram X. Kendi writes part a distillation of the thesis from his 2016 Stamped from the Beginning previously and part personal memoir of his own journey through racist ideas to an antiracist perspective. [more inside]
posted by GenjiandProust at 11:34 AM - 9 comments

June 29

Book: Convenience Store Woman

Convenience Store Woman (Japanese: コンビニ人間, Hepburn: Konbini ningen) is a 2016 novel by Japanese writer Sayaka Murata. It captures the atmosphere of the familiar convenience store that is so much part of life in Japan. The novel won the Akutagawa Prize in 2016. Aside from working as a writer, Murata worked at a convenience store three times a week, basing her novel on her experiences. [more inside]
posted by growabrain at 7:28 AM - 4 comments

June 28

Book: The Haunting of Tram Car 015

Cairo, 1912: The case started as a simple one for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities ― handling a possessed tram car. Soon, however, Agent Hamed Nasr and his new partner Agent Onsi Youssef are exposed to a new side of Cairo stirring with suffragettes, secret societies, and sentient automatons in a race against time to protect the city from an encroaching danger that crosses the line between the magical and the mundane. [more inside]
posted by dinty_moore at 1:30 PM - 6 comments

June 25

Book: Fed Up: Emotional Labor, Women, and the Way Forward

Fed Up: Emotional Labor, Women, and the Way Forward is Gemma Hartley's expanded version of her article Women Aren't Nags—We're Just Fed Up, which was published in Harper's Bazaar (Sept. 2017). Readers who remember our 2015 discussion about emotional labor (which gets a shout-out from Hartley) will recognize the book's themes: the struggle to define EL; EL at home and in the working world; and the challenges of finding a way to share the load, redefining what matters, and creating more egalitarian partnerships. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes at 7:55 AM - 1 comment

June 22

Book: Death's End

Death's End is a science fiction novel by the Chinese writer Liu Cixin. It is the third & final novel in the trilogy titled Remembrance of Earth's Past, following the Hugo Award-winning novel The Three-Body Problem and its sequel, The Dark Forest. It was a 2017 Hugo Award for Best Novel finalist and winner of 2017 Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel.
posted by LizBoBiz at 5:43 AM - 3 comments

June 20

Book: The Sawbones Book

Wondering whether eating powdered mummies might be just the thing to cure your ills? Tempted by those vintage ads suggesting you wear radioactive underpants for virility? Ever considered drilling a hole in your head to deal with those pesky headaches? Probably not. But for thousands of years, people have done things like this—and things that make radioactive underpants seem downright sensible! In their hit podcast, Sawbones, Sydnee and Justin McElroy breakdown the weird and wonderful way we got to modern healthcare. And some of the terrifying detours along the way. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 9:07 PM - 1 comment

June 18

Book: Devolution

A firsthand account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre
Part survival narrative, part bloody horror tale, part scientific journey into the boundaries between truth and fiction, this is a Bigfoot story as only Max Brooks could chronicle it -- and like none you've ever read before.
[more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 7:52 AM - 1 comment

June 16

Book: A Place of Greater Safety

Capturing the violence, tragedy, history, and drama of the French Revolution, this novel focuses on the families and loves of three men who led the Revolution--Danton, the charismatic leader and orator; Robespierre, the cold rationalist; and Desmoulins, the rabble-rouser.
posted by Chrysostom at 9:51 PM - 9 comments

June 15

Book: The Quincunx

"An extraordinary modern novel in the Victorian tradition, Charles Palliser has created something extraordinary—a plot within a plot within a plot of family secrets, mysterious clues, low-born birth, high-reaching immorality, and, always, always the fog-enshrouded, enigmatic character of 19th century—London itself." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 8:20 AM - 4 comments

Book: The Memory Police

A haunting Orwellian novel about the terrors of state surveillance, from the acclaimed author of The Housekeeper and the Professor ... A surreal, provocative fable about the power of memory and the trauma of loss. Author: Yōko Ogawa, translated by Stephen Snyder [more inside]
posted by jazon at 6:54 AM - 0 comments

June 12

Book: The Deep

Based off of the song with the same title by Clipping. The water-breathing descendants of African slave women tossed overboard have built their own underwater society—and must reclaim the memories of their past to shape their future.
posted by dinty_moore at 4:51 PM - 6 comments

May 25

Book: The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes

It is the morning of the reaping that will kick off the 10th annual Hunger Games. In the Capitol, 18-year-old Coriolanus Snow is preparing for his one shot at glory as a mentor in the Games. The once-mighty house of Snow has fallen on hard times, its fate hanging on the slender chance that Coriolanus will be able to out charm, outwit, and outmaneuver his fellow students to mentor the winning tribute. [more inside]
posted by jeather at 7:10 PM - 0 comments

Book: Unnatural Magic

Onna can write the parameters of a spell faster than any of the young men in her village school. But despite her incredible abilities, she’s denied a place at the nation’s premier arcane academy. Tsira is a troll who never quite fit into her clan, despite being the leader’s daughter. She decides to strike out on her own and look for work in a human city, but on her way she stumbles upon the body of a half-dead human soldier in the snow. As she slowly nurses him back to health, an unlikely bond forms between them, one that is tested when an unknown mage makes an attempt on Tsira’s life. Soon, unbeknownst to each other, Onna and Tsira both begin devoting their considerable talents to finding out who is targeting trolls before their homeland is torn apart.
posted by dinty_moore at 7:02 AM - 3 comments

Book: Ducks, Newburyport

Ducks, Newburyport is a 2019 novel by British author Lucy Ellmann which won the 2019 Goldsmiths Prize and was shortlisted for the 2019 Booker Prize. The bulk of the book is a very long, digressive, free-associative stream-of-consciousness in the mind of a forty-something mother-of-four in small-town post-Trump, pre-pandemic Ohio. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch at 4:06 AM - 3 comments

May 24

Book: The Jungle

The Jungle, novel by Upton Sinclair, published serially in 1905 and as a single-volume book in 1906. The most famous, influential, and enduring of all muckraking novels, The Jungle was an exposé of conditions in the Chicago stockyards. Because of the public response, the U.S. Pure Food and Drug Act was passed in 1906, and conditions in American slaughterhouses were improved. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 11:20 AM - 5 comments

May 23

Book: Hugo Nominated Novelettes 2020

The 2020 Hugo Award Winning Novellettes - works between 7,500 and 17,500 words, or roughly 30 - 70 pages. This is including works by NK Jemisin, Sarah Gailey, Sarah Pinsker, Caroline M. Yoachim, Siobhan Carroll, and Ted Chiang (full texts as they are available in the post) [more inside]
posted by dinty_moore at 6:16 AM - 2 comments

May 21

Book: Rodham

From the New York Times bestselling author of American Wife and Eligible, a novel that imagines a deeply compelling what-might-have-been: What if Hillary Rodham hadn't married Bill Clinton? [more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 7:44 PM - 7 comments

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