Agent Carter: Now is Not the End
January 7, 2015 3:03 AM - Season 1, Episode 1 - Subscribe

A spinoff from "Captain America" and "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" and a prequel to the events of "Marvel One Shot: Agent Carter", Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) fights the good fight against the forces of evil as a member of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s predecessor the Strategic Scientific Reserve (the S.S.R) while maintaining her cover as a telephone operator for Ma Bell in 1946 New York. First up: Howard Stark (Dominic Cooper) is accused of selling arms to the enemies of the United States and he turns to Peggy for help in clearing his name.

After the presumed death of Steve Rogers at the end of "Captain America: The First Avenger", Peggy Carter is working for the SSR. Dealing with the cavalier sexism of the organization and missing the chance to make a difference like she did during the war, she is contacted by Howard Stark (Dominic Cooper), the playboy industrialist she fought with during the war.

Stark says his "bad babies", the inventions that were far too powerful to share with even his friends, have been stolen from his vault. He fears he is being framed to make it seem like he is selling them to the enemies of America and is on the run after failing to appear for a Congressional hearing into the matter. He assigns his butler, Edwin Jarvis (James D'arcy), to help her in any way possible.
posted by inturnaround (53 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
"It's 1946 in New York. Peace has dealt Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) a serious blow as she finds herself marginalized when the men return home from fighting abroad. Working for the covert SSR (Strategic Scientific Reserve), Peggy finds herself stuck doing administrative work when she would rather be back out in the field; putting her vast skills into play and taking down the bad guys. She’s also trying to navigate life as a single woman in America in the wake of losing the love of her life, Steve Rogers—aka Captain America.

Peggy secretly packs her gun before heading off to her place of business, which looks like the phone company to the outside world. The subject of the moment at SSR is Howard Stark (guest star Dominic Cooper, Marvel’s Captain America: The First Avenger). This genius, multi-millionaire playboy is accused of selling his deadliest weapons to enemies of the United States. Stark is being framed. He covertly contacts Peggy, the only person he can trust, to clear his name.

Stark empowers his butler, Edwin Jarvis (James D’Arcy), to be at Peggy’s beck and call when needed to help assist her as she investigates and tracks down those responsible for selling these weapons of mass destruction. If caught going on these secret missions for Stark, Peggy could be targeted as a traitor and spend the rest of her days in prison—or worse.

At work under the supervision of Chief Roger Dooley (Shea Whigham), Peggy learns from battle-injured Agent Daniel Sousa (Enver Gjokaj) that arrogant, promotion-seeking Agent Jack Thompson (Chad Michael Murray) is following a lead on a club owner looking to fence Stark’s inventions. The guy’s name is Spider Raymond. He turns over an envelope of cash to a non-speaking man named Brannis. Later, Spider is pleasantly surprised when a gorgeous blonde enters his office. He likes blondes. Peggy Carter learned this by eavesdropping on her colleagues.

Peggy seductively questions Spider about the chemical formula he has in his possession. A forced kiss has a knockout effect on the club owner thanks to some potent lipstick being worn by the undercover blonde. Peggy breaks into Spider’s safe to discover the formula has already been made into a weapon. Jarvis lets her know the sphere she holds in her hand is quite volatile and will cause mass destruction if its shell is cracked.

Peggy takes down Spider’s henchman, but can’t make an exit right away. Thompson and his men have arrived on the scene. A mysterious man in a green suit, who had seen Peggy earlier, finds a now-conscious Spider fretting over his empty safe. He draws his gun. By the time Thomson and his men reach the office, Spider is dead. As for Green Suit, he can only watch as Peggy makes a hasty escape in the Stark car she’s using.

With her roommate, Colleen, sick in bed, Peggy uses a supply of household items to diffuse the weapon in the bathroom. A loud noise is heard in the other room. Peggy steps in to find that Colleen has been murdered. A brutal battle with the green-suited intruder, who has a scar on his neck where his voice box once was, ensues until the killer is hurled out the window. Peggy looks down on the ground below to see that there’s no body. She then breaks down in tears at the loss of her friend.

Peggy blames herself for Colleen’s death. Jarvis assures her that she is a credit to her profession even though the men in her office can’t see this. He introduces her to Dr. Anton Vanko, who analyzes the weapon Peggy disarmed. It came from a place called Roxxon Oil. Peggy realizes the Vita-Rays in the weapon are the same related to something called “Project Rebirth.” She finds the file on Steve Rogers while recalling the very last conversation they ever had. She assures Sousa that this isn’t something she does often.

An injured Green Suit makes contact with his colleagues. He’s ordered to complete his now-compromised mission at all costs. As for Peggy, she’s busy breaking into Roxxon Oil. Brannis is already there collecting a new weapon from a scientist there. Jarvis waits outside. Inside, Peggy draws her gun on Brannis, who finds safety by standing in front of a milk truck filled with nitramene spheres.

Brannis uses an electronic device to speak by holding it near the scar on his throat. It’s the same kind of scar Peggy saw on Green Suit. Brannis warns that Leviathan is coming. He drops the weapon in his hand to help aid in his escape. Peggy has 30 seconds to get out of the refinery. Jarvis avoids a hail of gunfire to speed into the grounds. Peggy bounds on top of his car. They speed away from the plant as the explosion/implosion effects of the weapons inside rock the night. It appears Mr. Stark’s invention works.

Peggy lets Jarvis know that he did very well. Jarvis lets Peggy know that his wife must never find out about his extracurricular activities. Later, after making sure that an obnoxious diner patron never again harasses her waitress friend, Angie, Peggy heads out into the street. Jarvis is watching from afar. He’s on the phone with Stark. He assures his boss that Peggy is an excellent choice who likely doesn’t have any suspicions at all. For what, and about what, are things yet to be known." (summary from ABC.com)
posted by inturnaround at 3:17 AM on January 7, 2015


My thoughts:

This show looks a sight better than Agents of SHIELD, perhaps the limited series budget allowed them to have a higher budget per episode?

That's Lyndsy Fonesca as the waitress at the automat (automats have waitresses?! Suspicious...I think she's dirty.). She's best known to me as the daughter of future Ted from "How I Met Your Mother".

It was really weird watching this the same night I watched the first episode of season two of Broadchurch with James D'Arcy playing a way different character there.
posted by inturnaround at 3:49 AM on January 7, 2015


OMG JARVIS IS THE BEST!
posted by Jacqueline at 4:05 AM on January 7, 2015 [4 favorites]


I bet we never see Mrs. Jarvis.
posted by inturnaround at 4:24 AM on January 7, 2015 [4 favorites]


I love all the 'that guys' in this show: Nucky's Brother! One Tree Hill guy! Tara's Stalker Vampire/Thomas Cromwell guy! The guy from that cancelled sitcom with Olivia Munn!
posted by leotrotsky at 5:35 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I suspect Mrs Jarvis will remain an off-screen enigma. (If it was a Moffat show, Mrs Jarvis would turn out to be a guy. If it were an open-ended show, we could eventually find out that Mrs Jarvis doesn't exist at all and our butler is crazier than we knew, or that Mrs Jarvis is a Kree or something.)
posted by rmd1023 at 5:36 AM on January 7, 2015


The show is a delight, Atwell and D'arcy are pitch perfect and my only question is how soon until she gets another mini series or a movie?
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 5:40 AM on January 7, 2015


Maybe Mrs. Jarvis is actually Maris Crane.

Speaking of "that guys", did anybody else notice James "Rusty Venture" Urbaniak as the wormy scientist that Peggy zaps with the flashgun?
posted by Strange Interlude at 5:43 AM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


Things I loved about Agent Carter:

1. The buddy cop between her and Jarvis was amazing. Her look when she's stuck listening to Benny Goodman as he takes care of dinner and his reaction to driving away from the reactor, especially.

(note: it is hard not to all caps JARVIS after all this time)

2. Ridiculous gadgets! All the ridiculous gadgets! Agents of SHIELD needs more ridiculous gadgets, IMO.

3. The direction and the fight choreography seems to be better than your average Agents of SHIELD episode (not counting the May vs. May fight scenes). It's just a lot less gray.

4. The Alias-like spy hijinks.

Things I loved less about Agent Carter:

1. The sexism seemed a little ham-handed. Not that they wouldn't be sexist, but that the sexism is always that stark and obvious and seems to be mostly regulated to incompetent dudes who don't know how to dress themselves. I did like that they added the scene with her and Sousa where she tells him off.

2. I'm a little sick of every single comic book hero pushing everyone else away because they get people around them hurt. I mean, it's a little more interesting because it's with a woman this time (and her former beau is near-literally fridged in the arctic), but it does feel a little tired. I'd much prefer if they kept more of the focus on her pushing everyone away because she feels like she needs to prove herself.
posted by dinty_moore at 5:45 AM on January 7, 2015


It's a very, very pretty show and I enjoyed the premier. Will watch again!
posted by rtha at 5:47 AM on January 7, 2015


Strange Interlude: Yes! I actually squeed a little when I saw his name in the credits. I love James Urbaniak and I'm glad to see him get work. (More Venture Bros, please!)
posted by rmd1023 at 6:28 AM on January 7, 2015


Angie is clearly working for Division.
posted by kmz at 6:32 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Only issue: it was a bit dark. Not content wise, just like visually. There are limits to the film noir look.
posted by The Whelk at 7:41 AM on January 7, 2015


Perhaps because it was the conclusion of the two episode arc, I liked the second episode a bit more than the first, but that's like saying, do I want apple pie or apple pie with ice cream? I enjoyed the first, for sure.

One of the aspects that I appreciate with Carter is how she uses the sexism to her own benefit, flipping it around the unconscious men and basically, making it a secret weapon. It's a male dominated society that happily and unwittingly handed our lady agent a tool to repeatedly use against them in multiple situations.

I also appreciated the fight scenes with Carter not afraid to get extremely physical. Her two punch combo to Jarvis at the outset was a fantastic introduction to her willingness to be a fighter.

Definitely finding the post-World War Two vibe interesting, be it the women being replaced on the line to the references to time in the service.

One thing I found a little disappointing was Stark, actually. I felt like he should have had a bigger presence charismatically.

All in all a successful reintroduction of Agent Carter after the one-shot.
posted by Atreides at 7:56 AM on January 7, 2015


I really enjoyed this - much tighter than Agents of Shield, more focused - perhaps the smaller cast helps with that, we really only needed to get to know Agent Carter and Jarvis this episode. The rest of the cast is fine with small drips and drabs and can be developed as we go.

One thing I was thinking about during this, and it was on my mind during the Captain America movies as well: I'm liking having heroes who are heroes; there's an earnestness to the time period and the Captain America ethos that could be handled in a poor way, but they seem to have struck the right balance here. These aren't the grim anti-heroes that we've come to expect, but rather people who believe in what they are doing and have passion and zeal and fire for it. Not that they act without thinking or without regret, but there isn't the huge moral grey zone that lots of other shows and movies and comic book stories seem to want to play with. I'm a fan of the anti-heroes and the moral grey zones of much of modern media, but I like this - I like the way they've handled it, it's not over the top, it's just that giving the characters certainty seems to drive the action better.

I think that they are going to start to explore the emergence of that moral grey zone and the uncertainty as the series unfolds, but its nice at the moment.

Also, I'm a little surprised at the treatment of the one male character in the office by the other men - these are all obviously veterans, and you have one guy who lost his leg (or at least took a major fucking injury doing his duty), and the other guys in the office make fun of him for that: "Are you standing up for her? 'Cuz I ain't got all day." That struck me as really, really odd given the time frame and the context. I wouldn't expect to see vets making fun of other vets for war wounds. I do hope that over time the other men in the office do become a bit more complex...but I am enjoying the very frank depiction of the sexism. I know some people are finding it over the top, but I think it's a very nice and refreshing change to so just how blatant it can be and how in your face it is; when the main character is a woman, I don't think there's anything wrong with being blatant about the issue to establish what her world is like.

Off to watch the second episode!
posted by nubs at 9:11 AM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


The second one was a lot stronger.
posted by The Whelk at 9:14 AM on January 7, 2015


So most of my feelings about Agent Carter boil down to "I LOVE YOU PEGGY CARTER," but I will try to be more nuanced.

Despite knowing that Steve is safely ensconced in an Arctic ice floe somewhere, I still teared up at all the stuff about him being presumed dead. I thought Peggy's grief for Steve was handled really well, particularly that she's mourning Steve, not Captain America.

I loved Peggy's interactions with Howard and Jarvis. I'm 100% on board with Jarvis being Peggy's kind of hapless sidekick. I'm also loving the show's visual style, which is pulpy and kind of noir and perfect. It's already much more assured than Agents of SHIELD in that regard, since I thought AoS teetered bizarrely between Saturday afternoon syndicated TV and srs bsnss action drama.
posted by yasaman at 9:31 AM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Maybe Mrs. Jarvis is actually Maris Crane.

Mrs. Jarvis is actually Maria Stark - she's getting the family connection she doesn't get from Howard. She too enjoys a bit of roleplay. That's why Jarvis has those hard and fast (after 9pm) timing rules.

I'm willing to put down a marker that Carter will turn out to be Tony Stark's birth mom - either via some sort of surrogate situation or a scandal.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:47 AM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


I really don't follow the Marvel Universe shows closely. I'm generally aware of the movies, and occasionally tune-in Agents of Shield, but it's not exactly captivating.

I watched Agent Carter mostly because there really wasn't much else on last night. Glad I did! It was good fun. I had a personal "Doh!" moment, though, when I caught the whole Jarvis thing...Both father and son Stark have personal assistants named Jarvis. The former human, the later AI. Nice touch.

Will definitely be tuning in for the rest of the episodes.
posted by Thorzdad at 9:49 AM on January 7, 2015


particularly that she's mourning Steve, not Captain America.


And the universe is allready paving over and glossing up his image - I wonder if the transition to Shield was funded by Cap merchandise.

I was kinda confused by the tone, which is both pulpy and comic book-y but also like, fairly violent and serious? The vulture recap hit it on the head: it's the same tone as the Bruce Timm animated batman series.
posted by The Whelk at 10:12 AM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


I've never really cared about the Marvel stuff, I've only seen a few of the movies. I haven't watched Agents of Shield. Agent Carter happened to be starting as we turned on the tv to watch something else, I was like, oooh, Hayley Atwell (she was the best part of Captain America!), we left it on and I got totally yelling-at-the-tv not-looking-at-my-phone sucked in.

Female-led period-set adventure has always been my sweet spot.
posted by everybody had matching towels at 10:55 AM on January 7, 2015


I had a personal "Doh!" moment, though, when I caught the whole Jarvis thing...Both father and son Stark have personal assistants named Jarvis.

This actually goes back to the original Iron Man and Avengers comics. Edwin Jarvis was Tony Stark's stuffy old English butler who kept up the Avengers mansion. When they updated Iron Man for the movies, they ditched the butler concept (likely for being too similar to Batman's Alfred) and made JARVIS an A.I.; The way that they're reintroducing the character as Howard Stark's butler in the '40s is both clever and respectful of the source material without being bound to it.
posted by Strange Interlude at 10:56 AM on January 7, 2015 [6 favorites]


The heavy sexism and bits about women being set aside as the guys come back struck me a little the MCU's take on some of the territory that The Bletchley Circle covered.

everybody had matching towels - check it out if you haven't seen it yet.
posted by rmd1023 at 11:33 AM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


As an aside...That Ant-Man teaser made the movie look a whole lot more appealing than I ever thought an Ant-Man movie ever would.

And, yes, if you haven't seen The Bletchley Circle, you have missed out. The first series was stronger than the second, but it's all well worth a look.
posted by Thorzdad at 12:05 PM on January 7, 2015


I loved this episode! I got a strong Fringe flashback with the typewriter :-)
posted by Pendragon at 12:10 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


So yeah, I said something about this last week before the episode, but I feel really strongly about it now:

If there isn't a whole ton of Agent Carter/The Bletchley Circle fanfic circulating soon, I am going to have to solve that problem for the world.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 1:13 PM on January 7, 2015 [5 favorites]


Mrs. Jarvis is actually Maria Stark

The timing doesn't really work for that. Tony isn't born until 1970, so a Maria Stark young enough to give birth in 1970 is unlikely to be old enough to be married in 1946.

I think Howard is a playboy for many years before eventually marrying a much younger woman.
posted by Jacqueline at 2:02 PM on January 7, 2015


Where did bubbles get his time machine? I think his actor will have to go through some incredibly major changes before I'll ever see him as anything other than bubbles.
posted by rebent at 3:15 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


Bubbles in this, and Clay Davis over on Gotham...it's confusing, especially since I'm doing a Wire rewatch too!
posted by nubs at 4:01 PM on January 7, 2015


I like how Ray Wise just keeps showing up in everything
posted by The Whelk at 4:02 PM on January 7, 2015 [2 favorites]


Am I the only person who keeps getting really hung up on there being waitresses at an automat?
posted by Shepherd at 5:01 PM on January 7, 2015


well, the waitress was serving hot hash browns and maybe eggs? The only food I saw auto-ed was the pie.
posted by rebent at 5:36 PM on January 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


I kept waiting for the blowhard in the automat to start inserting 'meow' into his complaints about powdered eggs.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 5:49 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


That was a thing in some automats! You had a range of services- from straight up everything is ala cart with no table service to basically diners that had a self-serve section. An automat looking to be "nice" would have coffee service at least.
posted by The Whelk at 5:50 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


(A lot of automat/diner history was trying to balance efficiency with service, which tied into the early history of fast food places basically coming into being to try and stop teenagers from stealing silverware or making a mess_
posted by The Whelk at 5:52 PM on January 7, 2015 [3 favorites]


I wasn't a huge fan of this first episode. It seemed a bit clumsy. Also claustrophobic; I'm not sure I like Agent Carter carrying the whole show, I certainly miss the Whedon ensemble cast thing. Like The Whelk I was confused at the tone. It was part silly but then also part very serious. Like I loved the bit where she beats the bad guys with home economics equipment: the refrigerator, the stove. But then she's beating a guy who's trying to kill her, so it's not so much a funny/wry commentary as a grim battle to the death. The bit about her bringing in coffee and then claiming she needed a sick day for "women's issues" was hilarious, but then so much of the actual sexism was awful and offensive. Just a bit jarring.

I'll definitely stick around for the next episode and given the whole commitment is only eight episodes I'll probably make it. But it felt like it needed more room to breathe.
posted by Nelson at 8:10 PM on January 7, 2015


So, today I learned that automats were a thing.

I seriously thought this was just a bit of random alternate universe stuff that Marvel threw in, like all those SSR gadgets.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 9:14 PM on January 7, 2015


Bubbles got his time machine in Sarah Connor Chronicles didn't he?
posted by Just this guy, y'know at 6:40 AM on January 8, 2015


I'm liking having heroes who are heroes; there's an earnestness to the time period and the Captain America ethos that could be handled in a poor way, but they seem to have struck the right balance here. These aren't the grim anti-heroes that we've come to expect, but rather people who believe in what they are doing and have passion and zeal and fire for it.

I think there's been a big resurgence in earnest in media in the last decade; ham-handed and lazy immediately post-9/11 with all the blither-blather about the death of irony (as if) and then getting better as smarter folks in media saw there's a demand for it.

But I think it's a lot easier for them to do it in a limited series than an ongoing, particularly when it comes to heroes and especially with super-heroes. Once you have someone with outsized power to their environment you have to confront what they choose to do and how they choose to exist within a structure, or that they choose to exist within it at all. If they simply Go Out And Do What's Right then you quickly must confront them having to make a choice between two unattractive outcomes. And then what? They can't shrug it off or they're heartless or insane. If they simply don't recognize that the system is broken then that's something too, and if you ignore it long enough your audience will have a disbelief problem and/or stop seeing your character as the uncomplicated positive force. Or you portray a world when it's not messed up and eventually you don't look like the world the audience lives in.

I think we get more grit because that's where a lot more stories exist.
posted by phearlez at 12:45 PM on January 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


phearlez - I agree; it probably only works in a limited series. And I think that we are going to see some of those changes in Agent Carter - the comment by one of the mute men about "You aren't going to like the world that's coming" or some such felt like a tip of the hat to me in terms of the earnest/heroic themes here at the start and the world we know is coming.
posted by nubs at 4:06 PM on January 8, 2015


I think the MCU is already balancing between heroes who are heroes, and grit and darkness pretty well. Captain America: The Winter Soldier had a thoroughly heroic Steve Rogers (and Sam Wilson and Natasha Romanoff), while still tackling some dark stuff. After all, that's the movie when Captain America realized the system was broken and decided that burning it down and exposing its secrets were the only options.

The events of CA:TWS bring a sense of foreboding and darkness to the Agent Carter miniseries, which is otherwise pretty pulpy and light. The viewers familiar with the MCU know that SHIELD is compromised by HYDRA, and we're already looking for the signs. Was the treatment of that prisoner the norm, or was it a sign of the already insidious presence of HYDRA? Or was that just the kind of thing that let HYDRA take root more easily? We know that while Peggy is running around dealing with Howard's ill-advised inventions, Bucky Barnes is being tortured and turned into the Winter Soldier. We know that Project Paperclip and all its compromises are coming up. We know that the world that Steve Rogers will wake into will be very different from this one.

The MCU offers a lot of great opportunities for this kind of storytelling and intertextuality, and I hope it doesn't become a shambolic mess like the comics continuities inevitably do.
posted by yasaman at 5:33 PM on January 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


I liked it overall. One complaint: Killing the roommate in the first episode was a bit too grim-dark for me. The pilot really reminded me of the Alias pilot, setting up the main character as a lone renegade with no one she can really trust and no personal ties to ground her.

Also, they killed the black guy. :(

But I don't mean to be too negative! There was a lot of great stuff there, promising start. I haven't watched the second episode yet.
posted by mbrubeck at 9:41 PM on January 8, 2015


One thing I found a little disappointing was Stark, actually. I felt like he should have had a bigger presence charismatically.

I kept expecting Varrick. I guess I have been spoiled for eccentric/egocentric Howard Hughes style inventors.
posted by happyroach at 2:05 AM on January 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


"Jarvis, do the thing!"

"Hold on a moment, sir, I need to check on dinner first"
posted by dinty_moore at 4:08 AM on January 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


I kept expecting Varrick. I guess I have been spoiled for eccentric/egocentric Howard Hughes style inventors.

Good lord, I may have fallen for the exact same trap.
posted by Atreides at 6:38 AM on January 9, 2015


I'm a little sick of every single comic book hero pushing everyone else away because they get people around them hurt. I mean, it's a little more interesting because it's with a woman this time

It was tired back when Buffy was whining about it for the final seasons of her show, and it's tired now.

One of the aspects that I appreciate with Carter is how she uses the sexism to her own benefit, flipping it around the unconscious men and basically, making it a secret weapon.

Although I thought Haley Atwell looked amazing in that gold dress, "lady cop/spy/detective uses the sexy to dazzle men" is hardly a new or fresh trope. Sigh.
posted by Squeak Attack at 7:59 AM on January 10, 2015 [1 favorite]


I thought the best example of the trope was her serving coffee to get inside the meeting to learn the info.
posted by Atreides at 4:53 PM on January 10, 2015 [3 favorites]


"Jarvis, do the thing!"

"Hold on a moment, sir, I need to check on dinner first"


If this season ends with Stark and Jarvis getting married, I will pop a bottle of champagne.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 4:22 PM on January 11, 2015


I thought the best example of the trope was her serving coffee to get inside the meeting to learn the info.

It's better than that. The men see through the obvious ruse, but still don't give a damn that they are talking about the information that they obviously intended to exclude her from in front of her. They know that they've given the info to her, and they don't care, because they truly believe she doesn't matter.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 4:24 PM on January 11, 2015 [3 favorites]




To be fair, color photography was still in its infancy, so not many people walked around in anything other than a grey-scale.
posted by Atreides at 9:48 AM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]






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