Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022)
April 1, 2022 7:58 AM - Subscribe

An aging Chinese immigrant is swept up in an insane adventure, where she alone can save the world by exploring other universes connecting with the lives she could have led.

Everything Everywhere All at Once is a 2022 American science fiction action comedy film written and directed by Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert. The film stars Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, Jenny Slate, Harry Shum Jr., James Hong, and Jamie Lee Curtis.
posted by BlahLaLa (89 comments total) 21 users marked this as a favorite
 
Holy. Moly. We saw it last night -- me, Mr. Blah, & our 18yo son -- and we freaking LOVED IT. It's a long movie, and we were on the edge of our seats the entire time. Michelle Yeoh -- okay, obviously she's amazing, and she's wonderful. But Ke Huy Quan feels like a revelation. He gives an incredibly moving and versatile performance. Just loved it.
posted by BlahLaLa at 7:59 AM on April 1 [9 favorites]


I have a sad. This appears to only be in art theaters, none of which are anywhere near me.
posted by Karmakaze at 8:42 AM on April 1 [1 favorite]


I have a sad. This appears to only be in art theaters, none of which are anywhere near me.

Me too!
posted by dhruva at 8:57 AM on April 1


Saw it last weekend and have spent a lot of time thinking about Jobu Tupaki.

Recommending reading: On Being Trans and Watching Everything Everywhere All at Once
posted by roger ackroyd at 9:11 AM on April 1 [6 favorites]


I have to think they're gonna open it wider at some point? I sure hope so, you guys. It's beautiful and deserves to be seen on a big screen.
posted by BlahLaLa at 9:12 AM on April 1


Yeah, from what I understand there's a wider release coming in a couple weeks time.
posted by Ipsifendus at 9:42 AM on April 1


Coming back to say I see their campaign says it opens wide on April 8th.
posted by BlahLaLa at 11:10 AM on April 1


So, so, so good.

The first couple showings in the Portland area were IMAX only, and I’d strongly recommending catching it in that format if you get the chance (even if it’s the crappy pseudo-IMAX that most of us stuck with). There’s a LOT going on, and the big/loud-ness really does help make the maximalism feel immersive rather than disorienting.
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 11:24 AM on April 1


Nearest showing is 40 miles away right now, hoping for closer soon
posted by one for the books at 1:22 PM on April 1


Ironic that "Everything Everywhere All At Once" has limited sites.
posted by SPrintF at 4:38 PM on April 1 [15 favorites]


I was so surprised it came out here (Malaysia) on the 25th already, considering it's an A24 film, even if Michelle Yeoh is the lead. Ahhhhhh so happy to manage to find a good time to watch it! It's almost like you can make it a double feature with Turning Red, and where you are in your life journey likely will influence which movie and which character resonate most, which in my case, it's definitely Evelyn nowadays.

I really hope this movie will mark an era for Ke Huy Quan on film again. He needs to be more things.
posted by cendawanita at 3:14 AM on April 2 [6 favorites]


(also my friends and I aren't used to seeing codeswitching bilingual Mandarin English the way we are -- seeing and living it -- with Cantonese, so that was fun! Though at first, we were like, did American scriptwriters take to heart all the jokes we've made about Firefly or what.)
posted by cendawanita at 3:17 AM on April 2 [3 favorites]


I saw some reviews that it had come out March 11, freaked out that I was going to miss it in theaters, and then bought the one showing I could find - a Wednesday evening Imax showing where the tickets were $20.

(the day after I bought the tickets, I noticed the wide release April 8)

I'm still glad I saw it in Imax - the movie was a lot emotionally (some whiplash between laughing and crying and chekov's buttplug) but the visuals were so good and the costuming and I'm glad I got to see it on a big screen.

Apparently the Daniels got their start in music videos, which makes sense, and I hadn't heard of Swiss Army Man before this, but apparently this being the same director duo explains a lot, too.
posted by dinty_moore at 7:44 PM on April 2 [2 favorites]


Apparently the Daniels got their start in music videos, which makes sense

If you haven’t seen the Turn Down For What music video, you’re in for a heck of a treat.
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 10:05 AM on April 4 [8 favorites]


One of the Daniels, Daniel Kwan, just watched Turning Red as well, and:

This is going to sound weird but I feel like my long lost twin sister made and released a movie at the same time as me (about a very similar subject matter) and this was the universe's way of letting me know. Cannot believe this is her first feature! What a win for Pixar.
posted by cendawanita at 12:09 AM on April 5 [11 favorites]


Phenomenal film. I relate a lot to Jobu Tabaki's nilhism and life experience, and I found this film so uplifting. It feels cliche to say a movie will make you laugh and cry, but this is that movie, plus so many other emotions, all at once.
posted by Emily's Fist at 9:03 AM on April 6 [5 favorites]


So, is A24's deal "we're going to pick up all the money and Oscars Hollywood has left lying around by just making movies about everybody else?"
posted by praemunire at 6:08 PM on April 7 [8 favorites]


Found this Boing Boing link to a GQ interview with Michelle Yeoh talking about several of her roles (including EEAAO) and she's even more delightful than I thought possible.
posted by sapere aude at 10:49 AM on April 8


I adored this. I would love to read something about verse-jumping as metaphor for code-switching - how living in multiple languages and multiple cultures is both an expansion of possibilities and the burden of managing multiple selves.
posted by Jeanne at 8:05 AM on April 9 [6 favorites]


Super fun and constantly surprising. Just loved Ke Huy Quan - hope to see him in more. So much bonkers creative energy flowing through the veins of it. So great to see immigrants and women and over-50 women especially getting to be whole, flawed, heroic people on a giant screen.

I did not find the emotional core of the movie to be earned - I feel like the daughter needed to be developed in the beginning as depressed or suffering more in order to explain the meaning of her multiverse selves. And the message - we just need to love each other and be nice - is pretty politically hollow. But hey, loving each other and being nice while making a lot of jokes about fucking and nostrils and whatnot is still an improvement over our grim, single-verse reality.
posted by latkes at 9:44 AM on April 9 [7 favorites]


Five stars out of five. My cheeks hurt from smiling.

I wondered from the trailer why Jamie Lee Curtis would take a role as the dowdy auditor. But oh man, she gets plenty to do too.

Having JLC in your movie is the genre film equivalent of having Beyonce bless your track.

(Obviously the real stars are Yeoh and Quan. Wow.)
posted by DirtyOldTown at 2:36 PM on April 9 [1 favorite]


If Charlie Jane Anders and Chuck Tingle had a baby, and the baby was a movie, this would be it. I adore the whole experience.
posted by Silvery Fish at 3:43 PM on April 9 [2 favorites]


There was a book I read many years ago, "The Fabric of Reality" by David Deutsch, that takes on the idea of a multiverse and, among other things, tries to wrestle with the question of how we can come to terms with the idea of a cosmos in which everything that's physically possible actually happens, somewhere. Like, not just the idea that are an infinite number of different versions of you, but that some of them will have made choices that you would find morally reprehensible. Some of them will have had biographies that render them so different that you wouldn't recognize them as "yourself". Some of them will have endured tragedies that you can't imagine...and some of them will have avoided tragedies that you can't imagine not being in your past.

There's a very real sense in which a form of nihilism can start to seem inevitable if you take the idea seriously: if everything happens, how can anything matter, particularly? And Deutsch makes it pretty clear that the idea should be taken seriously, because there's plenty of physical evidence to suggest that it's all true.

I don't think the film is suggesting "we just need to love each other and be nice". That's a pretty radically oversimplified version of what's going on. I think it's suggesting, rather, that in a cosmos that seems to be mechanistically grinding out every possible history, there's no higher authority to define for us how we should live, there's no external source of meaning for the things we live through and endure. There's only the sense we make of them ourselves. That love and kindness retain their power to make that existence tolerable isn't at all a trivial conclusion.
posted by Ipsifendus at 7:03 AM on April 10 [38 favorites]


This Twitter link has Michelle Yeoh speaking about how much the role meant to her.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 5:00 PM on April 10 [5 favorites]


I loved this. The Daniels also made the short Broomshakalaka, which has some of the same manic earnest energy.
posted by oulipian at 5:01 PM on April 10 [2 favorites]


I just learned that Jamie Lee Curtis's character's full name is "Deirdre Beaubierdra."
posted by DirtyOldTown at 7:21 AM on April 11 [8 favorites]


I loved this movie... so much. It was 200% my kind of movie. Yes, the first act could have been 10 minutes shorter... but it didnt need to be. I can't wait to watch it again.

That said... I found some of the emotional ending to be frustrating and dissapointing.

I've struggled with being not-understood by my mother/parents, not loved in a way that feels good and comfortable to me, so the fact that the "reconciliation" was still full of microagressions, still falling back on "we're family, I love you, that's all that matters" hurt me.

Evelyn didn't try to understand why Joy was withdrawing, or what she (Evelyn) could possibly have been doing (other than denying Joy's queerness) to push her daughter away. Maybe this was the more realistic ending (and therefore better). I just wish that Joy was given more space to express *herself* and see if what Evelyn had to say was really good enough for her--with or without the cultural constrains of familial loyalty. Blood is not a reason to allow yourself to be constantly and casually disrespected.

Fortunately, the thigns I loved vastly vastly override those things I didn't like. I was crying through much of the movie, both from laughter and from other emotions, and I can't wait to go through that wringer again.
posted by itesser at 10:55 AM on April 11 [6 favorites]


I loved Ke Huy Quan in Mr. Chow mode.
posted by hototogisu at 2:51 PM on April 12 [6 favorites]


I've struggled with being not-understood by my mother/parents, not loved in a way that feels good and comfortable to me, so the fact that the "reconciliation" was still full of microagressions, still falling back on "we're family, I love you, that's all that matters" hurt me.

I know what you mean, it felt like an odd choice for the film. But on reflection, it's a good and bold one.

People don't change overnight. They'll still have all their bad tendencies and may still act and speak in terrible ways. But given time, they can learn and more fully change. THe film is too subtle on this point, but it's where I think it went.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 3:52 PM on April 12 [19 favorites]


Saw this last night and my wife and I loved it. We'll likely see it in the theaters again we liked it so much.
posted by schyler523 at 11:55 AM on April 14


That was really well said, Brandon. Totally agree.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 12:59 PM on April 14


I've been wanting to see this since my friend raved after the opening what feels like ages ago (she's already seen it three times!). I am SO GLAD I finally got the chance to go, I absolutely loved it. Some of the points made above make a lot of sense, and I can see the minor criticisms about the denouement, but it worked for me. Possibly because it hits the sore points of not having any family left alive for me, of feeling that sense of being adrift that Joy struggles with or that frustration Evelyn has. I've often said that I would gladly listen to my twin sister insult me or bicker and quibble with me all the time if it meant I could have her back again. The resolution for the mother-daughter relationship isn't perfect, but man, I felt it, so so much.
posted by kitten kaboodle at 12:45 PM on April 15 [4 favorites]


The resolution for the mother-daughter relationship isn't perfect, but man, I felt it, so so much.

Agreed. I think that in this movie, the opposite of regret for ghost lives is being present in the current life, however imperfectly.
posted by MonkeyToes at 6:58 AM on April 16 [7 favorites]


Oh god this movie. I laughed and cried - so, so good. The way they explored multiple lives felt very relevant to my covid experience. I spent a lot of time thinking about what could have been, and my life choices up to that point. And accepting that this path I have is a good one, and it’s because of the people around me.

One of the most unique movies I’ve seen in a long, long time. Will be seeing it again.
posted by glaucon at 1:16 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


I haven’t seen this yet, so I’m not reading comments. The description left me kinda meh. But I saw the trailer in the theater and it made me excited. I want to see Michelle Yeoh save the universe thanks to her other selves!
posted by Monochrome at 6:09 PM on April 17


The movie was bonkers in a good way. It was every genre bending this way and that with hysterical call backs like Kubrick's 2001 and the rise of the hot dog fingers. It was daring, bold and put to shame much more expensive films with its measly budget of 25 million. If someone asked me where I think the science fiction bodhidarma was from in this film it comes more from Douglas Adams than Frank Herbert/Isaac Asimov.

Every actor was a amazing. Every. actor.

Entertainment Weekly Around the Table with cast and directors

Public Q&A Group after premiere during SXSW 2022

Group interview with cast and directors SXSW 2022
posted by jadepearl at 10:33 PM on April 17 [3 favorites]


My take on the ending wasn't so much love and family conquers all, but that nihilism isn't/doesn't have to be innately negative.

Joy sees all possible variations and comes to the conclusion that all happiness is fleeting and ultimately doesn't matter, so why not just end everything?

Evelyn sees the same variations and comes to opposite conclusion, all happiness is fleeting and ultimately doesn't matter, and that's why each moment of joy does matter.

If both choices are equally valid in the face of an utterly indifferent universe(s) where every possible variation will play out...why not embrace that and actively choose the kind path?

Everyone already has this power already, of course, we just can't see the effects of the alternate paths we might have chosen. But who cares? Ultimately, even in real life, nothing really matters, so why not actively choose kindness?
posted by Eddie Mars at 7:27 AM on April 18 [31 favorites]


I'm in awe of this movie's tonal range. It goes from profoundly silly to profoundly touching, sometimes in the same scene.

It feels like an antidote to Rick & Morty's multi-universe nihilism, for reasons Eddie Mars articulated well in the comment above this one.

"There's only one rule that I know of, babies-'God damn it, you've got to be kind.'"
posted by JDHarper at 7:57 AM on April 18 [11 favorites]


Thank you, I had also thought of the Vonnegut quote when Evelyn's husband told her that he had made kindness his weapon. Just a lovely movie.
posted by Eddie Mars at 8:08 AM on April 18 [5 favorites]




I've seen it twice and picked up so much more of the stuff I only caught a whiff of in the first viewing. Then I sought out a metafilter post about it.

It's my favorite movie. Flat out. No contest.

It's a sci-fi movie where superheros save the multiverse. It's a dramatic movie about a multi-generation immigrant family dealing with financial, marital, and parent-child issues. It's a deeply philosophical movie that explores nihilism, suicide, and the role of violence & empathy in conflict resolution. It's a movie about being gay and only having your mother's threadbare-tolerance. It's a beautiful martial arts movie with creative choreography. It's a comedy that has buttplug jokes, and a cop gets beaten to death with massive rubber cocks.

It's a movie where all but two of the main characters aren't just not-white but Asian. Ke Huy Quan's performance ranges across multiverse versions of his character: a goofy and wimpy dad, a martial arts multiverse hacker scientist, a high-class successful businessman living with quiet longing for a woman he loved but lost, and then that same goofy wimp dad who turns out to have a inner strength that has been supporting the family without a demand for thanks or recognition.

It has an everything bagel blackhole that represents the (Joju Tobaki alphaverse) daughter's desire to commit suicide and the (original universe) daughter's desire to separate from her mother (reproducing the separation of the mother to her own parents), and how connections to our loved ones are things that actively need to be maintained.

I love how it subverts the "violence and domination is the only way, and empathy is naive and weak" trope in other mutliverse stories (cough cough, Marvel and Rick & Morty). The first universe split happens between Evelyn going home from the IRS office and hosting the Chinese New Year's party, and Evelyn punching the IRS agent and getting the cops called on her and attracting the notice of Joju Tobaki.

It's not more realistic, mature, and grounded to use violence to solve problems instead of empathy and relationship-building. In movies, violence is the only way to triumph over the bad guy. In actual real life (and this movie), punching the IRS agent won't solve anything and only made things worse.

There's so much blink-and-you'll-miss-it stuff in this film. Martial-arts-universe-Evelyn has a kung fu mentor who tells her "even a cookie can be kung fu" while original-universe-Evelyn laments that her too-soft husband gave a box of cookies to the loathsome IRS agent, without realizing that this helped soften the IRS agent to allow them more time to prepare for their audit. The cookies lead to a solution, not kung fu.

It's a multiverse movie that is so chaotic and random and weird and yet the themes and plot are 100% coherent.

It's my favorite movie.
posted by AlSweigart at 10:18 AM on April 20 [33 favorites]


The cookies lead to a solution, not kung fu.

I definitely loved the dad's "kung fu" the best. I'm also glad they spelled it out the way they did. I also loved that actor and I'm surprised to learn he hasn't acted since he was a kid. He did such a great job!

I think that if the mom and dad roles had been gender-reversed it would have been less interesting. Traditionally moms/ wives get the "let's embrace non-violence and learn to appreciate relationships" role.

When the movie first started, I was intrigued to see Michelle Yeoh in a non-badass role.

Sort of off topic: I read a story once in which the main character was brought into the world of a woman who had been institutionalized due to a psychotic break that had her fighting monsters, and abusing and shunning loved ones in order to drive them away to keep them safe. It turns out that it was all true and, once inside her world, the "psychotic" one was the strong one because she'd been a warrior in this world for decades already. Now it was the narrator who was shying at shadows and cowering in corners while the institutionalized woman protected him.

In Everything Everywhere All at Once's box cutter scene I was afraid that's where it was headed but thankfully it turned out to be more pure Sci-fi than Twilight Zone.
posted by small_ruminant at 1:13 PM on April 20 [3 favorites]


"It's my favorite movie."

I said the same thing walking out of the theater the first time I went to see it. I felt silly, because I've loved so many great movies over the years, but it felt true. Perhaps because it felt like it incorporated and combined so much from other movies that I like (e.g. if you could stretch the mood and style of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind around the wireframe plot of It's a Wonderful Life, etc.). Glad to see someone else had the same reaction.
posted by mabelstreet at 3:09 PM on April 20 [5 favorites]


If you have Shudder, an interesting chaser to this is "You, Me, and Her" the second "episode" of the first season of Etheria. Nominally an anthology series, Etheria is really more like a collection of genre and genre-ish short films, which I believe are mostly or all done by young female directors from AFI.

Anyway, the premise is:
When 30 versions of one person pass through the wormhole at the Department of Parallel Resettlement, Anna discovers she is the worst possible version of herself.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 9:55 AM on April 22


Revisiting this after a second viewing. The film is still overwhelmingly awesome. I still laughed a lot (especially with catching details I missed the first time), and cried a lot, since the relationship between Evelyn and Joy *is* incredibly compelling.

I went for a second screening to more closely examine the criticism I had around the ending. I think a lot of my feelings come from the tension between the movie being Evelyn’s story and my life being Joy’s story. The movie shows the details of Evelyn’s experience—why she is the way she is and why she makes the decisions that she does. I (selfishly) wish there was more nuance for Joy/Jobu’s history. As it is, I’m gutted when Joy chooses reconciliation because it’s not an option for me. I wish there were more indications of Evelyn and Joy having a *good* (or even up-and-down) relationship in any universe, that Evelyn helps things make sense for Joy, not just pain. The karaoke clip in the mirror at the beginning is the only hint of that, and presented with such a sense of distance that it doesn’t feel connected with Joy’s experience.

I guess my “criticisms” are more a reflection of the fact that a film is not a substitute for therapy.

I don’t buy physical media anymore, but I’m going to make an exception for this one.
posted by itesser at 6:30 PM on April 22 [6 favorites]


This movie is everything The Matrix Resurrections should’ve been
posted by Apocryphon at 8:13 PM on April 23 [7 favorites]


I saw this yesterday afternoon and yes to all of the above posts. It was amazing, and yet I also agree that the resolution felt a little unearned and easy. But that earnestness is also kind of endearing?

The scene with Michelle Yeoh's face flickering through hundreds of realities really blew me away.
posted by Fleebnork at 5:31 AM on April 25 [1 favorite]


Saw this over the weekend and I loved it; better than I had any hope for.

I appreciate the criticism of the "love conquers all" resolution, but although the script can be viewed as fitting that pattern, I didn't get the same impression about the focus. If I remember right, the script avoided using the word "love" completely. That's not a free pass, of course, but that was a choice, and I think it must mean something.

Indeed the new thing Joy receives from Evelyn may be simpler: Her undivided attention. Which Evelyn had found so much harder to offer.

The Midwestern multiplex theater I saw this in was basically empty on a Saturday night. I can understand the decision to start with a limited release, I guess.
posted by Western Infidels at 6:42 AM on April 25 [4 favorites]


As it is, I’m gutted when Joy chooses reconciliation because it’s not an option for me.

I loved the movie, but I started crying just before the end of part 1, and hit full on ugly-sobbing with the rocks. I ... may have allowed it to hit me too hard in the mom feels, maybe because it's easier than wrestling with the philosophical questions or maybe because it's stupid Mother's Day season and this year is ten years since I lost my chance at working anything out with her and I'm just real deep in those feels right now anyway.

I have a feeling this will turn out to be an Important film, between the concepts and performances and artistry. I can't wait to see how that happens.
posted by ApathyGirl at 1:31 PM on April 25 [6 favorites]


watching it as a queer trans asian woman rapidly approaching middle age, i didn't know who i related to more, joy or evelyn.

i'm still processing it and thinking through it, weeks later.
posted by i used to be someone else at 1:21 PM on April 26 [4 favorites]


Just realized the googly eyes and the everything bagel were inversions of each other and I love the movie a little more.
posted by dinty_moore at 3:25 PM on April 26 [18 favorites]


I don't think I have "enjoyed" a movie more in a long time. Enjoyed is in inverted comma's since I am still trying to process it. My immediate summary: "WTF am I watching - I am so happy to be watching this".

Wife and I went and saw it in the local multiplex and while she thought it was OK, it is the only film I can remember that we have had multiple, hour long conversations about, in the week ofter seeing it.

This thread and the links here have changed my thoughts of maybe watching this agin with my adult non-binary child to: "I will watch this again with them".
posted by dangerousdan at 6:28 PM on April 27 [4 favorites]


I went tonight with a new friend, we were two of four people in the theatre, it was FAAAABULOUS.

HOT DOG UNIVERSE
RACOOCCOONIE
posted by sixswitch at 1:21 AM on April 28 [8 favorites]


I read at least one blogger saying: please see this in the theater, it's amazing. So I deployed my P100 respirator and my carbon dioxide monitor and watched a pre-noon showing of this (like 10 people in the theater) so I could go see my first in-theater movie in 2 years while minimizing COVID risk. I laughed, I cried. I can tell I'm gonna watch this again on the small screen, so I can pause and think about details.

I already enjoyed Stephanie Hsu from Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and am glad to see her getting good work. Always great to see Harry Shum Jr. (who was such a love-to-hate-him jerk in Love Hard). And I admire Ke Huy Quan's slow revelation of Waymond's character.

And it was such a treat -- unfortunately getting rarer on the US silver screen, as I understand it -- to watch an original scifi movie that wasn't based on a pre-existing book, podcast, comic, movie, or toy! (Honestly the last big spectacular ambitious sf movie I remember that wasn't based on anything else was maybe Jupiter Ascending?) Yet this is an intertextual movie that reflects how modern people live and think -- overtly with the Ratatouille explanation and the Racoccoonie universe, and a little more subtly with the 2001: A Space Odyssey homage and the Wong Kar-wai nods, all the way to the fictional (Evelyn watches on TV) fantasy of the two singing lovers.

The "do something incredibly unlikely to charge up the mechanism to connect to an alternate you" tool is (a) SUCH A COOL METAPHOR for how we need to get out of our ruts to take the first step to changing identity and building capability, and (b) even better than the Infinite Improbability Drive from Hitchhiker's Guide because it's an active choice a character can make. (Kind of makes me want to reread Kris Straub's Starslip webcomic.)

The idea that someone who's missed SO MANY opportunities is actually incredibly well-placed to step forward and grow and rise because there's basically nowhere to go but up -- what a useful way to think about it. And Evelyn's love-based approach late in the film, that fight up the staircase where she defeats her opponents by caring for them and healing them and giving them what they need -- fantastic to watch, glorious and brave. (If you liked that, you might like Ryan North's run on the Unbeatable Squirrel Girl comic from Marvel; Squirrel Girl often defeats opponents in a related way.)

The rocks! SO MOVING! And when they started moving! And when Joy's rock went off the cliff! And when Evelyn's followed it!! (If you liked that bit, consider reading Jon Bois's 17776 which has pretty high levels of pathos and humor emerge from plain text dialogue between inanimate objects.)

I love that you see these tiny glimpses of other realities, and then sometimes you get WAY MORE of them, and you cannot predict which of them will go that way, or in what direction. In general it's so great that this film goes in SURPRISING directions!! Yes! Please do things I don't know are going to happen next!
posted by brainwane at 4:26 AM on April 28 [19 favorites]


Loved this so much, still thinking about it days later, hard to list all the good and thought-provoking things. Thank you to everyone in here for comments that have made me remember more things about it; it delivers on so many levels. Their marriage, I don't even know what to say but it is a lot to think about.
One little thing that occurred to me is, I feel like (?) it's unusual to see Michelle Yeoh having a character stage that is kind of incredulous comically out-of-her-depth (and where she has to kind of rise to the occasion), eg the way she looks at Waymond during the fanny-pack fight... it's not a mode I remember seeing her in very often. It reminds me of a character arc I associate more with Jackie Chan (early in the movie he finds himself out of his depth, pulling comic faces, "oh no, holy crap, I'm just barely dodging out of the way", then we see him improve as a fighter and handle situations more competently) and it's a fun reversal to see it from her.
posted by LobsterMitten at 8:29 AM on April 28 [6 favorites]


Saw this last night with my son and we both were blown away. Loved every costume change for Joy, loved the fights scenes (so inventive with the fanny pack!), loved the soundtrack.
Son (18) was most affected by The Rocks. My thought was that MCU only thinks they've made a movie about the multiverse, and now Dr Strange is going to have to live in the shadow of this movie.
Can't wait to see it again.
posted by OHenryPacey at 8:57 AM on April 28 [2 favorites]


My thought was that MCU only thinks they've made a movie about the multiverse, and now Dr Strange is going to have to live in the shadow of this movie.

I love me some MCU and have already bought my tickets to Dr. Strange, but you're 110% right. This was a mindblowing and moving look at how our individual choices could be different in multi-verse.

Hats off to the Daniels, who I read somewhere turned down working in the MCU and honestly the world is so much better for it.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 10:15 AM on April 28 [2 favorites]


It's back in IMAX for a week, in the US.

It looks like the home release date is June 14.
posted by Pronoiac at 11:31 AM on April 28 [2 favorites]


I just watched it in a theater with four other people at 11:50am on a Thursday. It's the first time I've been in a movie theater since The Rise of Skywalker and I have to say this was a much more satisfying experience. I've been describing it as "a live action martial arts movie that combines the parts that matter from Turning Red and Rick & Morty" which is very much up my alley and, uh, not a movie I expected to ever actually get to see.

I'm kind of obsessed with the universe where people have hot dogs for fingers? I would watch a whole movie about Evelyn and Deirdre. Loved their matching haircuts so much and loved the discovery that even the hot dog hands universe gave Evelyn a skill she could use - so much of parenting is just realizing that there's not a single thing you've learned to do in your whole life that you can't bring to parenting and that realization felt extremely true and profound to me in the moment. I hope they become friends after the audit.
posted by potrzebie at 5:28 PM on April 28 [5 favorites]


It reminds me of a character arc I associate more with Jackie Chan (early in the movie he finds himself out of his depth, pulling comic faces, "oh no, holy crap, I'm just barely dodging out of the way", then we see him improve as a fighter and handle situations more competently) and it's a fun reversal to see it from her.

I’m shocked no one in the thread has mentioned that Evelyn’s role was initially written for Jackie Chan.
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 7:09 PM on April 28 [5 favorites]


I just keep thinking about Evelyn saying, "Give me back my Joy!" and hoo boy, haven't we all felt/said that in the last few years?

Daniels nailed it: Love is the only way to effectively fight depression or the urge to give up on life and embrace nihilism.

Two screenings down in the theater, and I know I'm going to watch it again soon. Each new viewing makes me see and realize something interesting I missed before!
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 8:12 AM on April 29 [2 favorites]


What a fun movie! Enjoyed this quite a bit. It's kind of a mess and I had some frustrations with the pacing at times but overall really loved everything about it.

This film reminded me most of the Wachowski films, if those filmmakers had gotten to a level of relatable excellence. Lots of The Matrix in this, but also Cloud Atlas and even a touch of Speed Racer in the visuals and silliness of it all. But setting all this looniness in a Chinese-American family really takes it in its own direction. And then the cast is phenomenal. (I'd naively thought more of the cast was from Hong Kong cinema but really they're all American actors except Michelle Yeoh, and she's now transcended any one country's film industry.)

The visual sequences where they were cutting every single frame were fantastic. It is very difficult to do that and make anything look coherent. And the brief glimpses we get of all these other scenes and settings, just wild creativity. Also that's a sequence that's going to suffer greatly in home streaming. I'm glad I got to a theater for it.
posted by Nelson at 8:21 AM on April 29 [1 favorite]


Man, somebody should definitely win an Oscar for the Jobu Tupaki costumes, holy moly. But honestly I don't think I can be coherent about how ambitious, creative and beautiful this film was. Mind blowing in the best way.
posted by emjaybee at 10:02 PM on April 29 [9 favorites]


This movie is a strange, beautiful, chaotic thing and I loved every second of it. All I knew before I went into the cinema was that it had Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan (yay!), had a multiverse (probably cool), and was by the guys who made Swiss Army Man. I didn't love Swiss Army Man but I was intrigued by it and had made a note to see anything else they made next.

Has anyone made or seen a list of any Easter eggs or Asian film references yet? Or will that be easier once it starts streaming?
posted by harriet vane at 4:01 AM on May 1


This Vanity Fair article has the highlights of the movie references. It's not a meticulous examination of every single easter egg though. Worth reading just because it reminds us about Wong Kar-wai's In the Mood for Love.
posted by Nelson at 8:00 AM on May 1 [2 favorites]


I just learned that Jamie Lee Curtis's character's full name is "Deirdre Beaubierdra."

Middle initial "D" no doubt. For Dierdre.
posted by Naberius at 12:04 PM on May 4 [1 favorite]


Or maybe her middle name is "Bananafana."
posted by DirtyOldTown at 9:35 AM on May 5 [3 favorites]


Just saw this for the 2nd time in IMAX, and I’m astonished by how efficient the production design is. Anything you see on screen is either necessary, awesome, or both, which is really kind of mind-blowing when you consider just how packed to the rafters the whole production is.
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 11:48 AM on May 5 [4 favorites]


I’m astonished by how efficient the production design is

Yes! And at the start of the movie, I thought quirky things were for the sake of being quirky and was prepared to find it tiresome but no- everything was there for a reason.

There's something so satisfying about a movie whose direction is trustworthy. It's like dancing with a fantastic lead dancer. At the end, I didn't feel like they'd lead me around just because they could- there was a goal in mind.
posted by small_ruminant at 12:23 PM on May 5 [5 favorites]


round trip, I spent 3 hours on the highway and I'm pretty bagged at work this morning after seeing the late show.. went with my partner and sister.. I'm sure anyone reading this thread is a member of the choir, but any praises about this film are earned imo
- haven't felt like re-watching a movie since forever, I already have a friend I want to arrange a viewing with and I was thinking that through much of the movie last night
- haven't been so hyped for a film, and then have it so fully satisfy me
- it's a wonderful film, it does what films are supposed to do
posted by elkevelvet at 7:29 AM on May 6 [4 favorites]


OK, I need someone to fill in a gap in my memory. There's the big scene in the IRS office where Joy chooses not to go into the everything bagel, and then they're in the laundromat, and I honestly can't remember what the transition was. I got so absorbed by that scene visually that I may have entered a different state of consciousness. How is the chaos at the IRS office resolved?
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:03 PM on May 7


There's the big scene in the IRS office where Joy chooses not to go into the everything bagel, and then they're in the laundromat [...] How is the chaos at the IRS office resolved?

I recall those scenes being in different dimensions. There's a dimension where the family gets in a huge battle in the IRS Office. And a more mundane dimension where Waymond negotiates another day to work on the taxes so they go home.
posted by Emily's Fist at 8:45 PM on May 8 [3 favorites]


Yeah I feel like it's resolved by resolving the domestic conflict during the party in the laundromat?? But honestly it's a blur for me as well.
posted by latkes at 8:56 PM on May 8


I caught the movie at its last showing in a suburban theatre. I was blown away by it. From Jobu Tupaki's costumes (the Everything Bagel Wedding Gown was, well, everything) to Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan smouldering at each other under In the Mood for Love-style lighting in the universe where they were happiest and most successful because they hadn't been together - it was perfect.

My take on the ending wasn't so much love and family conquers all, but that nihilism isn't/doesn't have to be innately negative.

To me, it's about the triumph of absurdism over nihilism. Absurdism is inherently hopeful, because it's all we've got. It also really spoke to me about living with ADHD and imposter syndrome: what if I'm too everywhere to be useful in this universe?

Oh, and googly eyes.
posted by scruss at 7:53 PM on May 11 [4 favorites]




I finally got to see this. I disagree with the point above that Joy's disaffection wasn't earned. One of the scenes that hit me hard was early on when Evelyn ran out to stop Joy from leaving and what she wanted to say turned into "You need to stop eating so much." I could hear that she was saying "I love you*" in the only language she could access, but of course Joy could only hear the text because (a) humans are not mind readers and (b) that is a severely dysfunctional way of communicating. We can see that Joy has been experiencing Evelyn's attempts to show love as a series of cruel attacks. We can read between the lines that Alpha-Evelyn saw Alpha-Joy's talent and instead of just saying as much**, pushed Alpha-Joy harder and harder to excel until she broke.

On some level, Evelyn even knows what she's doing because she recognizes she is doing to Joy what her father did to her, but can't make herself stop.


* I love you -> I love you and want you to be well -> I want you to be well and take care of yourself -> Take care of yourself in this specific way -> I will make you take care of yourself in this specific way by hitting a sore spot.

** "I will support you in developing how amazing you are" just reads as "you are still not good enough"
posted by Karmakaze at 6:44 AM on May 17 [8 favorites]


I also managed to see Multiverse of Madness on Saturday and Everything Everywhere All at Once on Sunday, for a jarring comparison. I think I can note without spoiling the Marvel film addresses some of the same emotional points re: infinite multiverses with much less depth and intimacy. It's notable, especially given the "The West Misses The Point" article above that in both cases the needed perspective shift comes from an Asian man.
posted by Karmakaze at 6:51 AM on May 17 [1 favorite]


I am so glad this finally got released outside the US! What a fantastic film, will definitely watch it again. Some links:
Daniels Unpack the Everything Bagel of Influences Behind Everything Everywhere All at Once [Vulture/Archive]
“Everything Everywhere All At Once” Is a Queer Masterpiece of Colossal Sincerity [Autostraddle]
How Stephanie Hsu Brought One of the Year’s Best Queer Characters to Life [Them]
posted by ellieBOA at 12:49 PM on May 18 [1 favorite]


This is both the best and most movie I've seen in a long while.
posted by slimepuppy at 4:00 PM on May 18 [3 favorites]


Dressing for the Multiverse: The actress Stephanie Hsu talks about how clothes convey the full range of character in “Everything Everywhere All at Once.” [NYT/Archive]
posted by ellieBOA at 3:51 AM on May 19 [1 favorite]


Finally saw this last night, after being excited with this comment here at MeFi.

It was... AMAZING. Beautiful, haunting, absolutely bonkers.

Hands-down the best movie I have seen in a very long time - easily the best sci-fi movie in recent memory.
posted by rozcakj at 4:56 AM on May 19 [1 favorite]


We saw this last weekend and I'm still putting together my thoughts. I loved Jobu Tupaki's costumes beyond measure, and I'd watch it again just for those alone. The first scene with the rocks just killed me. The timing of the dialogue was perfect.

I loved all the tiny details I caught as well. In the living room under the TV there's a stack of board games. You can't really make them out, but one of them is called Happiness. Dierdre has the carpal tunnel brace on her wrist when she's an accountant, and then has one on her ankle in the hot dog hands universe. And just how many places they stuck circles in the art direction.

The only thing that bothered me is how much they circled it around the mother-daughter conflict without referencing the dad's role in their dynamic at all. I understand that this is their story, and that that's what drives the plot. But he's right there and has been Joy's whole life - no matter how Joy felt about how here mom treated her, there's a triangle here and it doesn't make sense to ignore that. Even a simple throwaway "no wonder he wants to leave you," would do it. It felt like (forgive me) a hole in the story that made his relationship with Evelyn less solid as well. He felt like less of a fully formed character and more of a foil for her growth. But it's a small quibble - Ke Huy Quan was fantastic and any problem I had with the writing / treatment of his character was more than cancelled out by his performance.
posted by Mchelly at 8:10 AM on May 19 [1 favorite]


Lots of things to say, sorry if I'm just repeating something written above, I'm not copying, honest, we just think alike.

Firstly, the first thing I did was text a friend to say to go and see it: "It is astonishing, ceaselessly entertaining and often beautiful".

Secondly, it's one of those things that the universe is now divided into before it came out and after. For reference, the last film I remember changing everything so instantly was Fury Road.

Walking home from the cinema I felt an urge to burst into tears without knowing why, exactly.

I was very reminded of two aphorisms: "in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes" - Benjamin Franklin; and "After the ecstasy, the laundry" - which I attribute to Jack Kornfield, though he may be quoting someone else. Perhaps also, because he's been on my mind after the thread on the blue, "There is no enemy" - Thomas Dolby.

I find it quite moving that they create a character in Dierdre who's is designed in appearance, role and behaviour to be unlovely and carefully and subtly show her beauty.
posted by Grangousier at 8:13 AM on May 19 [3 favorites]


Oh, and one more thing, is this the first appearance of Portsmouth Sinfonia in a mainstream film?
posted by Grangousier at 8:52 AM on May 19 [3 favorites]


That "West Misses the Point" article is very interesting- thank you for posting it, Coaticass!
posted by small_ruminant at 1:24 PM on May 19


All at Once: An Interview with the Makers of "Everything Everywhere All at Once" (Film Freak Central):
"[W]e're shielding ourselves from experiencing art, because we're just trying to pick it apart, understand it, label it before we even have a chance to let it move through you. This movie was very engineered to scramble all those wires, all the intellectual pieces of language you might have to describe a movie are thrown out the window, so early on you have no other choice but to feel and to experience."
posted by MonkeyToes at 8:28 AM on May 21 [1 favorite]


Mrs. Example and I just saw it, and enjoyed it a lot. Also, whatever the fight choreographers were paid, it wasn't enough.
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 4:04 PM on May 21 [1 favorite]


I joined All Access A24, the A24 fan club and they sent me a minibook by the Daniels called Tax Season full of tax trivia and tax jokes.
posted by DirtyOldTown at 7:11 PM on May 21 [2 favorites]


This weekend was the first unbearably hot weekend of the not-yet summer in the mid-Atlantic, so it was the perfect time to sit in a cool, dark theater and finally see this. It was great, very glad I didn't wait for streaming, although I'm sure I'll watch it again at home.

I personally completely lost it at the first use of the Absolutely (Story of a Girl) lyrics - just so random but also instantly recognizable to me - but I only caught the RV country cover later, missing the other 2 versions completely. I love that I know I'm going to catch so many other missed details in this in future viewings.
posted by the primroses were over at 1:41 PM on May 22


« Older Movie: Studio 666...   |  Domino Masters: Season One... Newer »

You are not logged in, either login or create an account to post comments

poster