Posts in the Books category.
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October 12

Book: Sistah Vegan

Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health, and Society (Lantern Books 2010) explores food politics, identity, sexuality, health, womanism, feminism, decolonization, anti-racism, eco-sustainability, and animal rights through the lens of the black female vegan experience in the USA. It is the first volume of its kind to address the racial and gender vegan experience in the USA. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 3:01 PM - 0 comments

October 8

Book: Never Home Alone

Even when the floors are sparkling clean and the house seems silent, our domestic domain is wild beyond imagination. In Never Home Alone, biologist Rob Dunn introduces us to the nearly 200,000 species living with us in our own homes, from the Egyptian meal moths in our cupboards and camel crickets in our basements to the lactobacillus lounging on our kitchen counters. You are not alone. Yet, as we obsess over sterilizing our homes and separating our spaces from nature, we are unwittingly cultivating an entirely new playground for evolution. These changes are reshaping the organisms that live with us--prompting some to become more dangerous, while undermining those species that benefit our bodies or help us keep more threatening organisms at bay. No one who reads this engrossing, revelatory book will look at their homes in the same way again.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 3:50 PM - 2 comments

Book: Flight from Neveryon

(From the generic umbrella copy that autopopulates here for these books): The eleven stories, novellas, and novels in Return to Nevèrÿon's four volumes chronicle a long-ago land on civilization's brink, perhaps in Asia or Africa, or... Flight from Neverÿon was largely written in 1983 and 1984 and first published in 1985. The book consists of two shorter stories and one novel, “The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals”, Delany’s response to the AIDS crisis, and is notable as possibly the first published fictional work taking AIDS as its catalyst and subject. [more inside]
posted by mwhybark at 8:51 AM - 5 comments

October 7

Book: The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop.

J. Henry Waugh is an accountant, albeit an unhappy one. However, each night after he comes home from work, Henry immerses himself in a world of his choosing: a baseball league in which every action is ruled by the dice. [more inside]
posted by COD at 5:57 PM - 4 comments

October 5

Book: The Future of Another Timeline

From Annalee Newitz, founding editor of io9, comes a story of time travel, murder, and the lengths we'll go to protect the ones we love. [more inside]
posted by signal at 6:24 PM - 2 comments

October 3

Book: Wood-Frame House Construction

DIY wood-frame house construction book. With diagrams, for example, on how to frame out a window. With tables, for instance, on what size header you need to span a certain width window gap. Published by the USDA's Forest Service. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 9:53 PM - 1 comment

Book: The Trauma Cleaner

Winner of the Victorian Prize for Literature, Sarah Krasnostein’s The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster is the fascinating biography of one of the people responsible for tidying up homes in the wake of natural—and unnatural—catastrophes and fatalities. Homicides and suicides, fires and floods, hoarders and addicts. When properties are damaged or neglected, it falls to Sandra Pankhurst, founder of Specialized Trauma Cleaning (STC)... [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes at 6:10 PM - 2 comments

Book: Permanent Record

Edward Snowden, the man who risked everything to expose the US government’s system of mass surveillance, reveals for the first time the story of his life, including how he helped to build that system and what motivated him to try to bring it down. In 2013, twenty-nine-year-old Edward Snowden shocked the world when he broke with the American intelligence establishment and revealed that the United States government was secretly pursuing the means to collect every single phone call, text message, and email. The result would be an unprecedented system of mass surveillance with the ability to pry into the private lives of every person on earth. Six years later, Snowden reveals for the very first time how he helped to build this system and why he was moved to expose it.
posted by holmesian at 4:17 PM - 3 comments

September 30

Book: Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion

Trick Mirror is an enlightening, unforgettable trip through the river of self-delusion that surges just beneath the surface of our lives. This is a book about the incentives that shape us, and about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly in a culture that revolves around the self. In each essay, Jia writes about the cultural prisms that have shaped her: the rise of the nightmare social internet; the American scammer as millennial hero; the literary heroine’s journey from brave to blank to bitter; the mandate that everything, including our bodies, should always be getting more efficient and beautiful until we die. [Goodreads] [more inside]
posted by ellieBOA at 9:45 AM - 2 comments

September 29

Book: The Wee Free Men

The first in a series of Discworld novels starring the young witch Tiffany Aching. A nightmarish danger threatens from the other side of reality. . . . Armed with only a frying pan and her common sense, young witch-to-be Tiffany Aching must defend her home against the monsters of Fairyland. Luckily she has some very unusual help: the local Nac Mac Feegle—aka the Wee Free Men—a clan of fierce, sheep-stealing, sword-wielding, six-inch-high blue men. Together they must face headless horsemen,...
posted by aniola at 7:18 PM - 5 comments

Book: Women's Work

New discoveries about the textile arts reveal women's unexpectedly influential role in ancient societies. Twenty thousand years ago, women were making and wearing the first clothing created from spun fibers. In fact, right up to the Industrial Revolution the fiber arts were an enormous economic force, belonging primarily to women. Despite the great toil required in making cloth and clothing, most books on ancient history and economics have no information on them. Much of this gap results from the extreme perishability of what women produced, but it seems clear that until now descriptions of prehistoric and early historic cultures have omitted virtually half the picture. Elizabeth Wayland Barber has drawn from data gathered by the most sophisticated new archaeological methods—methods she herself helped to fashion.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 9:50 AM - 6 comments

September 28

Book: Spinning

Tillie Walden's graphic memoir about being a mid-level competitive figure skater and queer teen in Texas. Spinning captures what it’s like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know.
posted by dinty_moore at 10:03 AM - 4 comments

September 25

Book: Anne of the Island

New adventures lie ahead as Anne Shirley packs her bags, waves good-bye to childhood, and heads for Redmond College. With old friend Prissy Grant waiting in the bustling city of Kingsport and frivolous new pal Philippa Gordon at her side, Anne tucks her memories of rural Avonlea away and discovers life on her own terms, filled with surprises...including a marriage proposal from the worst fellow imaginable, the sale of her very first story, and a tragedy that teaches her a painful lesson. [more inside]
posted by bq at 2:40 PM - 18 comments

Book: Tales of Neveryon (book 1, Neveryon series)

(This is for the first book, see below) In his four-volume series Return to Nevèrÿon, Hugo and Nebula award-winner Samuel R. Delany appropriated the conceits of sword-and-sorcery fantasy to explore his characteristic themes of language, power, gender, and the nature of civilization. Wesleyan University Press has reissued the long-unavailable Nevèrÿon volumes in trade paperback. The eleven stories, novellas, and novels in Return to Nevèrÿon's four volumes chronicle a long-ago land on civilization's brink, perhaps in Asia or Africa, or... [more inside]
posted by mwhybark at 10:12 AM - 1 comment

September 24

Book: The Water Dancer

From Ta-Nehisi Coates, the National Book Award–winning author of Between the World and Me, a boldly conjured debut novel about a magical gift, a devastating loss, and an underground war for freedom.
posted by Etrigan at 4:52 PM - 2 comments

Book: The End of Alzheimer's

In this paradigm shifting book, Dr. Bredesen offers real hope to anyone looking to prevent and even reverse Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline. Taking insights gleaned from over 40 years in medicine, Dr. Bredesen has authored a groundbreaking guide to prevent and reverse Alzheimer’s Disease that fundamentally changes how we understand cognitive decline. [more inside]
posted by aniola at 10:42 AM - 6 comments

September 22

Book: Neveryona, or the Tale of Signs and Cities (book 2)

In his four-volume series Return to Nevèrÿon, Hugo and Nebula award-winner Samuel R. Delany appropriated the conceits of sword-and-sorcery fantasy to explore his characteristic themes of language, power, gender, and the nature of civilization. Wesleyan University Press has reissued the long-unavailable Nevèrÿon volumes in trade paperback. The eleven stories, novellas, and novels in Return to Nevèrÿon's four volumes chronicle a long-ago land on civilization's brink, perhaps in Asia or Africa... [more inside]
posted by mwhybark at 5:42 PM - 15 comments

September 21

Book: One Summer

In One Summer Bill Bryson transports readers on a journey back to one amazing season in American life. Over a few months in 1927 Lindbergh made his historic flight, Babe Ruth hit 60 HRs, The Jazz Singer was filmed, and the first working TV was demonstrated. Also, KKK membership was growing rapidly, Eugenics was becoming accepted as normal, thousands of Americans were dying from alcohol purposely poisoned by the federal government, and thousands more died when the Mississippi river flooded and the Federal government ignored it as not their problem. It was one hell of a summer.
posted by COD at 7:47 AM - 4 comments

September 20

Book: Where the Water Goes

The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from the Colorado’s headwaters to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and RV parks, to the spot near the U.S.–Mexico border where the river runs dry. Water problems in the western United States can seem tantalizingly easy to solve: just turn off the fountains at the Bellagio, stop selling hay to China, ban golf, cut down the almond trees, and kill all the lawyers. But a closer look reveals a vast man-made ecosystem that is far more complex and more interesting than the headlines let on. The story Owen tells in Where the Water Goes is crucial to our future: how a patchwork of engineering marvels, byzantine legal agreements, aging infrastructure, and neighborly cooperation enables life to flourish in the desert —and the disastrous consequences we face when any part of this tenuous system fails.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 8:33 PM - 2 comments

September 16

Book: Wanderers

Shana wakes up one morning to discover her little sister in the grip of a strange malady. She appears to be sleepwalking. She cannot talk and cannot be woken up. And she is heading with inexorable determination to a destination that only she knows. But Shana and are sister are not alone. Soon they are joined by a flock of sleepwalkers from across America, on the same mysterious journey. And like Shana, there are other “shepherds” who follow the flock to protect their friends and family on the long dark road ahead. [more inside]
posted by fifteen schnitzengruben is my limit at 10:26 PM - 4 comments

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