Star Trek: Voyager: Repression   Rewatch 
May 31, 2018 4:41 AM - Season 7, Episode 4 - Subscribe

On the starship Voyager, assaults against former Maquis are considered especially troubling. The dedicated detective who investigates these vicious felonies is security officer Lieutenant Commander Tuvok. This is his story. *DUNK DUNK*

Some of the many hidden memories of Memory Alpha are best left hidden:

- Derek McGrath and Jad Mager reprise their roles as Maquis-Starfleet officers Chell and Tabor. Chell was seen in season one's "Learning Curve", and Tabor was seen in season five's "Nothing Human".

- Anthony Montgomery, who later played Travis Mayweather on Enterprise, had auditioned for the role of Tuvok's son.

- Brannon Braga was responsible for a rewrite to freelancer Haskell Smith's teleplay but went uncredited.

- This is the last episode of the series to be directed by Winrich Kolbe.

- It is in this episode that we first learn that Chakotay's ship was named the Val Jean. The name was displayed on the monitor that Teero was using to check on the Maquis' personnel files.

- Teero's phrase to activate the repressed memories is "Pagh t'em far", a Bajoran word similar to pagh'tem'far, which was used to describe a vision from the Prophets in DS9: "Rapture".

- Seven of Nine mentions that the ship is currently 35,000 light years from Earth.

- Among the items in Teero's residence are models of the Maquis Raider used on both Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and in "Caretaker", and of the saucer module from a Galaxy-class starship.

- Among the Maquis seen in this episode were Tabor, Chell, Ayala, Doyle, Jor, Yosa, Golwat, and an unidentified Vulcan female. This contradicts "Counterpoint", which made it clear that Tuvok and Vorik were the only Vulcans aboard.


"Pagh t'em far, B'tanay."

- Teero Anaydis


"These will make the images on the screen appear three-dimensional."
"Let me get this straight: you've gone to all this trouble to program a three-dimensional environment that projects a two-dimensional image, and now you're asking me to wear these to make it look three-dimensional again?"
"Great, isn't it?"

- Paris and Torres, referring to 3D glasses


"All ready for Attack of the Lobster People?"
"I am not familiar with that species."

- Chakotay and Tuvok


"Your sarcasm could be viewed as subterfuge."

- Tuvok


Poster's Log:
Well, here's another too-little-too-late Maquis episode—an enjoyable, if not especially unique, story concept that would've fit a lot better three or four seasons ago. But I always love a Tuvok episode, and perhaps even more importantly, the rest of the cast is given stuff to do here, which hasn't happened reliably through the preceding seasons, but which seems to be happening a lot in season seven, based on where my own rewatch is at. Some sloppy plotting aside, it's an engaging hour, with a lovable framing device in the 3-D theater. (Tom's reference to Attack of the Lobster People, however, did make me wistful for "Captain Proton"…but never fear! CAPTAIN PROTON WILL RETURN in just a few episodes…)

Poster's Log, Supplemental:
You might remember Keith Szarabajka (Teero) from Angel, where he played the vampire hunter Holtz. You might not remember the episode of Enterprise he was also in.

The movie Tom and B'Elanna watch in the holodeck, Revenge of the Creature, was featured in the first episode of MST3K's season eight, a major turning point in the show wherein they got a new network (the Sci-Fi Channel), new villains, and a new voice and puppeteer for Crow.
posted by CheesesOfBrazil (13 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
I thought that this was pretty good, although there were a few unanswered questions, such as what Teero's end game is (at this point, the Dominion War is over and Cardassia lies in ruins; I think that there'd be a lot less enthusiasm for founding wildcat colonies in the former DMZ, even among the very few surviving Maquis) and how they think that they're going to go the rest of the way with a quarter of the crew. Some reference to "Worst Case Scenario" or even hinting that they might be able to recruit some of the Starfleet people would have been nice. And I think that the reveal of Tuvok as the attacker was a little too early; the potential of there being another Lon Suder in the crew, maybe even using Vorik as a red herring, might have been teased. But these are relatively minor things, and the idea of having a Manchurian Candidate who can infect other crew members with Teero's Maquis mental virus is an inspired one.
posted by Halloween Jack at 6:26 AM on May 31, 2018 [1 favorite]


I'm kind of at a loss regarding this episode. It's reasonably well acted. The plot holds together. There's continuity from last week and they even get the distance home somewhat correct. All that's required is that we believe Brainwashing by Mindmeld is possible, and several years after the Maquis were all wiped out, one of them is still alive and interested in taking revenge on Tuvok.

The brainwashing technique Tuvok's employing could possibly be a reference back to Sybok's in Star Trek V, I guess. Maybe? Can't remember any other examples of a mindmeld being used that way in any other incarnation of Trek. Is it within the realm of possibility? Yes. But it feels really contrived.

Other than that, there's nothing overtly wrong with this one. It just feels kinda pointless.
posted by zarq at 11:40 AM on May 31, 2018 [2 favorites]


Particle of the Week: Honorable mention to photons. The special effects on the holodeck reconstruction were cool looking.
Pointless STO Comparison of the Week: There's a single mission in the Romulan arc involving Tal Shiar brainwashing that's pretty creepy.

Ongoing Counts:
* Maximum Possible Photon Torpedoes: -17.
* Crew: 137.
* Credulity Straining Alpha Quadrant Contacts: 14.
* Janeway's Big Red Button: 2 aborted self-destructs, 1 successful, 2 games of chicken, 1 ramming speed.

Notes:
* Lotta Idiot Balling in the second half.

The first half of the story works well enough: Tim Russ is always great, and he can carry a farfetched premise like 'investigate myself for crimes I committed under mind control.' He sells it.

However, once they knew he'd been mindmelding with the crew, letting his victims go without further observation and giving him free access to comms is inexcusable. Security like that, and it's no wonder everybody can break into all things Starfleet.

* The Maquis plot element doesn't work.

As you guys have already mentioned, Teero's actions make zero sense in the big picture. The Maquis were wiped out by the Dominion, interstellar politics back home are way different now, the Maquis integrated about 20 minutes after Caretaker, there's no indication what Teero even wanted besides revenge, etc. etc. etc.

The reveal mostly served to remind me of how badly they handled the Maquis stuff right from the jump, rather than feeling like the aforementioned Worst Case Scenario or something. I mean, at least stuff Seska did made some kind of sense.

Anyway... mostly with zarq's take here: it was fine to watch, but also pointless.
posted by mordax at 12:41 PM on May 31, 2018 [2 favorites]


Also, did they really lock up Tuvok with his communicator? Isn't that a no-no?
posted by zarq at 6:05 PM on May 31, 2018 [2 favorites]


They totally did, and I can't imagine why that would not be against procedure given the way voice commands work on Starfleet vessels.
posted by mordax at 6:43 PM on May 31, 2018 [1 favorite]


It should be SOP for the brig, since everyone else takes them away; the Dominion took Worf and Bashir's when they were in the space stalag, which is why Garak had to jury-rig the communicator to signal the runabout.
posted by Halloween Jack at 7:57 PM on May 31, 2018 [1 favorite]


Hey now, Teero totally could've also hypno-suggested to Tuvok that he taint the ship's water supply with Stupid Sauce
posted by CheesesOfBrazil at 2:59 AM on June 1, 2018 [2 favorites]


That would explain so much.

Starting in Season 1. :)
posted by zarq at 4:34 AM on June 1, 2018 [2 favorites]


OT: guys I found a meme
posted by Halloween Jack at 2:45 PM on June 1, 2018 [2 favorites]


I'm suddenly wondering how 'VGR' was never Voyager's three-letter shorthand.
posted by mordax at 5:34 PM on June 1, 2018


Via Jack's link above:
I’m walking around and talking to the people I know. And I see Terry Farrell standing off by herself. I’d never actually met her, so I sheepishly go up and introduce myself to her, and I said, ‘Ms. Farrell, I’m André Bormanis.’ ‘Oh, nice to meet you. What do you do on the show?’ I’m like, ‘I’m the science consultant. I’m the guy who puts all that technobabble into your dialogue.’ And she literally grabbed me by the lapels and lifted me off my feet. She’s six feet tall. She’s a very tall, striking woman. She’s, like, ‘You fucking asshole!’
That cracked me up, but it also left me wondering 'was it because the lines were hard, or because the technobabble was implausible?'

Also, apparently STO's 'Victory is Life' update dropped and I missed it entirely. S'pose I will have to pop in and find an excuse to talk about it at some point.
posted by mordax at 12:44 AM on June 2, 2018


... so, I've been reading that confessions Tumblr all day - sort of a 'fell down the rabbit hole' kinda binge, and I've learned some more stuff.

* Tom Paris got a Threshold action figure that appears to be real.

* Manu Intiraymi‏ (Icheb's actor) is a real piece of work, defended Kevin Spacey's actions toward Anthony Rapp. (Don't wanna provide any links, but it was pretty disgusting.)

* Star Trek confessions are apparently really popular, supporting multiple blogs like this.
posted by mordax at 8:54 PM on June 2, 2018 [2 favorites]


I'd resisted posting any links to the Intiraymi stuff, but yeah, it's pretty not-great.
posted by Halloween Jack at 8:48 AM on June 3, 2018 [1 favorite]


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