8 posts tagged with evolution.
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Book: The Ghosts Of Evolution

A new vision is sweeping through ecological science: The dense web of dependencies that makes up an ecosystem has gained an added dimension-the dimension of time. Every field, forest, and park is full of living organisms adapted for relationships with creatures that are now extinct. In a vivid narrative, Connie Barlow shows how the idea of "missing partners" in nature evolved from isolated, curious examples into an idea that is transforming how ecologists understand the entire flora and fauna of the Americas. This fascinating book will enrich the experience of any amateur naturalist, as well as teach us that the ripples of biodiversity loss around us are just the leading edge of what may well become perilous cascades of extinction.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Jul 8, 2019 - 1 comment

Book: The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack

n his new book The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack, human paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall argues that a long tradition of "human exceptionalism" in paleoanthropology has distorted the picture of human evolution. Drawing partly on his own career—from young scientist in awe of his elders to crotchety elder statesman—Tattersall offers an idiosyncratic look at the competitive world of paleoanthropology, beginning with Charles Darwin 150 years ago, and continuing through the Leakey dynasty in Africa, and concluding with the latest astonishing findings in the Caucasus. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Jun 11, 2019 - 2 comments

Book: Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet Worms

From one of the world’s leading natural scientists and the acclaimed author of Trilobite!, Life: A Natural History of Four Billion Years of Life on Earth and Dry Storeroom No. 1 comes a fascinating chronicle of life’s history told not through the fossil record but through the stories of organisms that have survived, almost unchanged, throughout time. Evolution, it seems, has not completely obliterated its tracks as more advanced organisms have evolved; the history of life on earth is far older—and odder—than many of us realize. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Mar 25, 2019 - 1 comment

Book: Sapiens

From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” From IndieBound.org.
posted by CMcG on Jan 10, 2019 - 7 comments

Star Trek: Enterprise: Dear Doctor  Season 1, Ep 13

Captain Archer could've used a second opinion. [more inside]
posted by mordax on Oct 28, 2018 - 21 comments

Star Trek: Voyager: Threshold  Rewatch   Season 2, Ep 15

Adult Mutant Starfleet Salamanders, Adult Mutant Starfleet Salamanders, Adult Mutant Starfleet Salamanders, heroes on the Threshold! (Amphibian power!) [more inside]
posted by Halloween Jack on Apr 17, 2017 - 28 comments

Podcast: The Bugle: Bugle 4017 – Evolution special

Andy is joined by Helen to look at a few stories of human endeavor, including: creation of the MAMMOPHANT, beauty spot stag do’s and traffic lights versus Darwin. What are we doing to prolong humankind? Not much AND too much.
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Feb 19, 2017 - 2 comments

Book: The Signature of All Things

"[Elizabeth] Gilbert, the author of the phenomenally successful memoir Eat, Pray, Love (2006), returns to fiction with her first novel in 13 years, and what a novel it is! Taking her sweet time and digressing at will into areas ranging from botany to spiritualism to illustration, she tells the rich, highly satisfying story of scholar Alma Whittaker. Born to Henry Whittaker, “the richest man in Philadelphia,” who rose from his station as the son of a lowly gardener to an import tycoon, Alma has the benefit of wealth and books, spending hours learning Latin and Greek and studying the natural world. But her plain appearance and erudition seem to foretell a lonely life until she meets gifted artist Ambrose Pike. Their intense intellectual connection results in marriage, but Ambrose’s deep but unorthodox spiritual beliefs prevent them from truly connecting. Alma, who has never traveled out of Philadelphia, embarks on an odyssey that takes her from Tahiti to Holland, during which she learns much about the ways of the world and her own complicated nature. Gilbert, in supreme command of her material, effortlessly invokes the questing spirit of the nineteenth century, when amateur explorers, naturalists, and enthusiasts were making major contributions to progress. Beautifully written and imbued with a reverence for science and for learning, this is a must-read." - Booklist [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Mar 1, 2016 - 6 comments

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