The Department of Time: Tiempo de pícaros. (Time of Rogues)   First Watch 
May 10, 2018 10:55 AM - Season 1, Episode 6 - Subscribe

The Ministry is called to investigate when archaeologists find a cell phone belonging to a missing 21st century corrupt executive in a room that was sealed off in 1520. Julián, Amelia and Alonso travel to the past and meet the novella-inspiring Lazarillo de Tormes. Meanwhile, Irene interrogates Paul Walcott who has been captured by the Ministry and locked in a 1053 prison in Huesca.

Notes

* The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes and of His Fortunes and Adversities is a Spanish novella which was published anonymously because of its anticlerical content in 1554. It is considered one of Spain's greatest contributions to literature after Don Quixote. However, Lazarillo de Tormes is fiction. This episode postulates that it was based on a real person.
* The book was banned by the Spanish Inquisition, and as a result became quite well known and translated throughout Europe, where it was widely copied.
* Lazarillo de Tormes is considered the first picaresque novel ever written, and is credited by modern scholars as founding the genre. (The word 'picaresque' comes from the Spanish word 'picaro' meaning rogue, which gives us the title of this episode.)
* Paul Walcott works for Darrow Ltd, a private American company that created a nuclear-powered machine which can open a tunnel through time.
* We meet Armando Leiva, Irene's former mentor in the Ministry. He was imprisoned because he tried to bring his son, who had leukemia, to the 20th century. This is against Ministry rules.
* Leiva asks Irene to find out who betrayed him
* We meet Susana Torres, liaison between the Spanish government and the Ministry. Salvador really dislikes her.
posted by zarq (1 comment total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
The book was banned by the Spanish Inquisition, and as a result became quite well known and translated throughout Europe, where it was widely copied.

Should we be talking about the "Lazaro Effect" rather than the "Streisand Effect", then?
posted by tobascodagama at 11:36 AM on May 10 [2 favorites]


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