134 posts tagged with history.
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Lodge 49: Circles  Season 2, Ep 6

Liz attends Champ's housewarming party, and discovers that there's more happening at Orbis, while Dud finds Blaise, as Blaise found Jackie's story. "We're stuck in a circle, but the magic is just there, just beyond. Merrill knew."
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 16, 2019 - 7 comments

Book: Fishing

In this history of fishing—not as sport but as sustenance—archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis. Where agriculture encouraged stability, fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food—lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting—for traders, travelers, and conquering armies. This history of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show readers how fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Sep 1, 2019 - 3 comments

Book: Tasting the Past

In search of a mysterious wine he once tasted in a hotel room minibar, journalist Kevin Begos travels along the original wine routes—from the Caucasus Mountains, where wine grapes were first domesticated eight thousand years ago, crossing the Mediterranean to Europe, and then America—and unearths a whole world of forgotten grapes, each with distinctive tastes and aromas. We meet the scientists who are decoding the DNA of wine grapes, and the historians who are searching for ancient vineyards and the flavors cultivated there. Begos discovers wines that go far beyond the bottles of Chardonnay and Merlot found in most stores and restaurants, and he offers suggestions for wines that are at once ancient and new.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Jul 16, 2019 - 1 comment

Book: Chaucer's People

The Middle Ages re-created through the cast of pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales. Among the surviving records of fourteenth-century England, Geoffrey Chaucer’s poetry is the most vivid. Chaucer wrote about everyday people outside the walls of the English court—men and women who spent days at the pedal of a loom, or maintaining the ledgers of an estate, or on the high seas. In Chaucer’s People, Liza Picard transforms The Canterbury Tales into a masterful guide for a gloriously detailed tour of medieval England, from the mills and farms of a manor house to the lending houses and Inns of Court in London. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Jul 1, 2019 - 3 comments

Movie: The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot

A legendary American war veteran is recruited to hunt a mythical creature.
posted by paper chromatographologist on Jun 30, 2019 - 2 comments

Podcast: Making Gay History: Stonewall 50 - Episode 1 - Prelude to a Riot

In this first episode of Making Gay History’s Stonewall 50 season, we hear stories from the pre-Stonewall struggle for LGBTQ rights. Travel back in time to hear voices from the turbulent 1960s and to understand the tinderbox that was Greenwich Village on the eve of an uprising.  [more inside]
posted by roger ackroyd on Jun 13, 2019 - 0 comments

Warrior: The Blood and the Sh*t  Season 1, Ep 5

Transporting precious cargo via stagecoach through the Sierra Nevada, Ah Sahm and Young Jun are forced to spend the night with three strangers at a frontier saloon in the middle of nowhere. The detour turns perilous when a notorious outlaw, Harlan French, shows up with his henchmen, looking for a lucrative payday. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 8, 2019 - 5 comments

Warrior: The White Mountain  Season 1, Ep 4

Big Bill finds himself compromised by his gambling excesses, but discovers a possible solution after an opium-den raid. Penny reveals the circumstances that prompted her to marry Mayor Blake, who's determined to show voters he won't tolerate San Francisco's "Yellow Peril." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 8, 2019 - 3 comments

Warrior: John Chinaman  Season 1, Ep 3

Accused of assault and perhaps worse, Ah Sahm gets a cold shoulder from the Hop Wei, with his fate in the hands of an unexpected ally. Buckley talks to Mai Ling about straining the relationship between the Long Zii and Hop Wei, while Leary pressures gentleman industrialist Byron Mercer, Penny's father, to hire his men for the cable-car track job.
posted by filthy light thief on May 2, 2019 - 6 comments

Book: The Library Book

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who? [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Apr 30, 2019 - 7 comments

Book: Salt

In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions. Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, Salt is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Apr 3, 2019 - 1 comment

Book: The Invention of Murder

In this fascinating exploration of murder in the nineteenth century, Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the Victorians and gave rise to the first detective fiction Murder in Britain in the nineteenth century was rare. But murder as sensation and entertainment became ubiquitous, transformed into novels, into broadsides and ballads, into theatre and melodrama and opera―even into puppet shows and performing dog-acts. Detective fiction and England's new police force developed in parallel, each imitating the other―the pioneers of Scotland Yard gave rise to Dickens's Inspector Bucket, the first fictional police detective, who in turn influenced Sherlock Holmes and, ultimately, even P.D. James and Patricia Cornwell. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Apr 2, 2019 - 4 comments

Book: The Way We Never Were

The definitive edition of the classic, myth-shattering history of the American family Leave It to Beaver was not a documentary, a man's home has never been his castle, the "male breadwinner marriage" is the least traditional family in history, and rape and sexual assault were far higher in the 1970s than they are today. In The Way We Never Were, acclaimed historian Stephanie Coontz examines two centuries of the American family, sweeping away misconceptions about the past that cloud current debates about domestic life. The 1950s do not present a workable model of how to conduct our personal lives today, Coontz argues, and neither does any other era from our cultural past. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Mar 26, 2019 - 2 comments

Book: SPQR

In SPQR, an instant classic, Mary Beard narrates the history of Rome "with passion and without technical jargon" and demonstrates how "a slightly shabby Iron Age village" rose to become the "undisputed hegemon of the Mediterranean" (Wall Street Journal). Hailed by critics as animating "the grand sweep and the intimate details that bring the distant past vividly to life" (Economist) in a way that makes "your hair stand on end" (Christian Science Monitor) and spanning nearly a thousand years of history, this "highly informative, highly readable" (Dallas Morning News) work examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries. With its nuanced attention to class, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, SPQR will to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Mar 22, 2019 - 8 comments

Book: The Fate of Rome

A sweeping new history of how climate change and disease helped bring down the Roman Empire Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome's power, a story of nature's triumph over human ambition. Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Mar 20, 2019 - 2 comments

Book: The Unwomanly Face of War

Alexievich chronicles the experiences of the Soviet women who fought on the front lines, on the home front, and in the occupied territories. These women—more than a million in total—were nurses and doctors, pilots, tank drivers, machine-gunners, and snipers. They battled alongside men, and yet, after the victory, their efforts and sacrifices were forgotten. Alexievich traveled thousands of miles and visited more than a hundred towns to record these women’s stories. Together, this symphony of voices reveals a different aspect of the war—the everyday details of life in combat left out of the official histories. [more inside]
posted by mixedmetaphors on Mar 16, 2019 - 2 comments

Book: Pale Rider

In 1918, the Italian-Americans of New York, the Yupik of Alaska and the Persians of Mashed had almost nothing in common except for a virus--one that triggered the worst pandemic of modern times and had a decisive effect on the history of the twentieth century. The Spanish flu of 1918-1920 was one of the greatest human disasters of all time. It infected a third of the people on Earth--from the poorest immigrants of New York City to the king of Spain, Franz Kafka, Mahatma Gandhi and Woodrow Wilson. But despite a death toll of between 50 and 100 million people, it exists in our memory as an afterthought to World War I. [more inside]
posted by Homo neanderthalensis on Mar 13, 2019 - 2 comments

Book: America Is Not the Heart

How many lives fit in a lifetime? When Hero De Vera arrives in America–haunted by the political upheaval in the Philippines and disowned by her parents–she’s already on her third. Her uncle gives her a fresh start in the Bay Area, and he doesn’t ask about her past. His younger wife knows enough about the might and secrecy of the De Vera family to keep her head down. But their daughter–the first American-born daughter in the family–can’t resist asking Hero about her damaged hands. (Penguin Random House blurb) Elaine Castillo's debut novel, and well-regarded, from Kirkus Reviews to Bustle. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 16, 2019 - 4 comments

Book: Sapiens

From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” From IndieBound.org.
posted by CMcG on Jan 10, 2019 - 7 comments

Podcast: Data & Society: Temp: How American Work...Became Temporary

Historian Louis Hyman on the surprising origins of the "gig economy." Hyman is joined in conversation by Data & Society's Labor Engagement Lead Aiha Nguyen and Researcher Alex Rosenblat. Hyman's latest book "Temp: How American Work, American Business, and the American Dream Became Temporary" tracks the transformation of an ethos that favored long-term investment in work (and workers) to one promoting short-term returns. A series of deliberate decisions preceded the digital revolution, setting off the collapse of the postwar institutions that insulated us from volatility including big unions, big corporations, and powerful regulators. Through the experiences of those on the inside–consultants and executives, temps and office workers, line workers and migrant laborers–Temp shows how the American Dream was unmade.
posted by CMcG on Jan 5, 2019 - 0 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de espías (Time of spies)  First Watch   Season 3, Ep 2

The agents travel to Spain and France in 1943 to ensure the success of Britain's "Operation Mincemeat" during WWII. A Spanish spy captured in Nazi-occupied France is revealed to be an important figure in the Ministry's past and its present. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 9, 2018 - 3 comments

The Department of Time: Con el tiempo en los talones (With Time on His Heels)  First Watch   Season 3, Ep 1

Amelia and Alonso are sent to the premiere of "Vertigo" at the 1958 San Sebastián Film Festival, to foil a plan by Russia to kidnap Alfred Hitchcock and force him to produce propaganda films. While the Ministry is under construction, a wheelchair-bound Salvador becomes suspicious of a Sony Walkman-wearing construction worker he observes through his office window. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 28, 2018 - 4 comments

The Department of Time: Cambio de tiempo (Change of Time)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 13

Season Finale: After the defeat of the Spanish Armada along the English coast in 1588, King Philip II decides to break the Ministry rules (imposed by his great-grandmother Isabella) and travel back in time to so the Armada will win the battle. When the Ministry refuses to help, Philip takes over, discovering that he can not only travel into the past but the future as well. Julián, Alfonso and Amelia return to 2016 from a mission to find history has been drastically changed. Philip is now King of the World, and the King of Time. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 20, 2018 - 6 comments

The Department of Time: Hasta que el tiempo os separe (Til Time Do Us Part)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 12

Ortigosa and Natalia's wedding is complicated by a hidden time portal and a romantic legend from the 13th century. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 19, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de lo oculto (Time of the Occult)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 11

When the host of a show about paranormal mysteries and conspiracies reveals the existence of the Ministry on the internet, Salvador tries to convince him that he is mistaken by inviting him on a tour of headquarters, while pretending that it is the dullest government office in Spain. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 12, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: Separadas en el tiempo (Separated by Time)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 10

In the present, Irene looks into a mystery involving "Las Sinsombrero," a group of avant-garde women artists and activitsts who have been forgotten. In the course of her investigation, it is discovered that the Vampire of Raval was not arrested when she should have been. She is free, and may be traveling through time. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 6, 2018 - 6 comments

The Department of Time: Óleo sobre tiempo (Oil Painting Over Time)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 9

A Velázquez painting is auctioned off in 2016. But the painting in question was one of many destroyed in a fire at the Alcázar de Madrid in 1734. Velázquez is given a mission: travel back in time with Irene to investigate the paradox. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 5, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de valientes (Time of the Brave) -- Part 2  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 8

Salvador sends Alonso on a mission to save Julián from a lengthy battle during the Siege of Baler in the Philippines. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 4, 2018 - 9 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de valientes (Time of the Brave) -- Part 1  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 7

While hiding out in the Philippines in the 19th century, Julián makes a promise to a dying soldier that gets him into a dangerous situation.
posted by zarq on Jun 4, 2018 - 2 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de magia (Time of magic)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 6

The team travels to 1920s New York into the world of magic and Houdini, as the Ministry's own existence is placed in peril. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 1, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: Un virus de otro tiempo (A Virus from Another Time)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 5

During a mission in 1918 to attend the birth of Carmen Amaya, Irene falls ill with the Spanish flu. New undersecretary Susana orders (against regulations)) that Irene be retrieved and returned to the Ministry, risking widespread exposure to a highly contagious disease that once killed millions and for which there is no vaccine. Soon, more personnel begin to show flu symptoms and the Ministry is forced to close its doors to prevent the disease from being spread through time. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 30, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: El Monasterio del Tiempo (The Convent of Time)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 4

In 1808, Napoleon visited the Royal Convent of Santa Clara de Tordesillas, where the abbess convinced him to release three prisoners that were about to be executed. Unfortunately, the abbess has unexpectedly died before she met Napoleon. Now, the Ministry must send a replacement to convince him not to execute the prisoners, as one of them is an ancestor of Adolfo Suárez González, the first Prime Minister of Spain after the military dictatorship of Francisco Franco. Adolfo guided Spain through its transition to a democracy. His ancestor must survive! [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 29, 2018 - 3 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de hidalgos (Time of Noblemen)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 3

Pacino joins the team for the first time as they work to ensure that Miguel de Cervantes publishes "Don Quixote" in 1604. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 24, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: El tiempo en sus manos (The time on his hands)  First Watch   Season 2, Ep 2

Salvador activates a protocol to have Julián detained and returned to the Ministry. Meanwhile, a cop from 1981 arrives in the present chasing a murderer who fled through a closet that turns out to have been a time door. His name is Jesús Méndez, nicknamed "Pacino" for his resemblance to the actor. In 2016, Pacino discovers that the he was declared guilty in absentia of the murders he was investigating. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 22, 2018 - 6 comments

The Department of Time: La leyenda del tiempo (The Legend of Time)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 8

Season finale. When the Ministry discovers that a young Salvador Dali has designed a film poster in 1924 depicting a modern electronic tablet computer, the team is sent to investigate. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 14, 2018 - 12 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de venganza (Time of Revenge)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 7

In 1843, Isabella II of Spain became Queen at the age of 13 (with her mother Maria Christina assuming regency). A year later, she demanded to visit the Ministry of Time. Former Ministry agent Armando Leiva, who recruited Irene back in 1960, has escaped from a Ministry prison in the Middle Ages and plans to kill the Queen during her visit. With the very existence of the Ministry at stake, Ernesto, Amelia and Alonso are sent to foil Leiva's plans. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 11, 2018 - 9 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de pícaros. (Time of Rogues)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 6

The Ministry is called to investigate when archaeologists find a cell phone belonging to a missing 21st century corrupt executive in a room that was sealed off in 1520. Julián, Amelia and Alonso travel to the past and meet the novella-inspiring Lazarillo de Tormes. Meanwhile, Irene interrogates Paul Walcott who has been captured by the Ministry and locked in a 1053 prison in Huesca. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 10, 2018 - 4 comments

The Department of Time: Cualquier tiempo pasado (Any time in the past is better)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 5

Julián, Amelia and Alonso travel to 1981 to ensure a Picasso painting is returned to Spain. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 9, 2018 - 9 comments

Movie: Apocalypse Now

During the Vietnam War, Captain Willard is sent on a dangerous mission into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade Colonel who has set himself up as a god among a local tribe. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on May 7, 2018 - 19 comments

The Department of Time: Una negociación a tiempo (Bargaining in time)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 4

Salvador sends the team to 1491 to save the first discoverer of the time doors from the Spanish Inquisition. Amelia hides her job at the Ministry by telling her 1880 parents that she has a boyfriend. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 7, 2018 - 5 comments

The Department of Time: Cómo se reescribe el tiempo (How time is rewritten)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 3

The Ministry sends agents to 1940 after a man being chased by Nazis promises to show Heinrich Himmler how to travel in time if he'll spare his life. Amelia, Julián and Alonso travel to Montserrat. Ernesto and Irene go to Hendaye, where Hitler and Franco negotiate Spain's participation in WWII. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 3, 2018 - 10 comments

The Department of Time: Tiempo de Gloria (Time of Glory)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 2

Julián, Amelia and Alonso are ordered to travel to Lisbon, 1588 to prevent the playwright Lope de Vega from dying before he writes his greatest works. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 2, 2018 - 8 comments

The Department of Time: El tiempo es el que es. (Time is what it is.)  First Watch   Season 1, Ep 1

El Ministerio del Tiempo (The Ministry of Time) is the best kept secret of the Spanish state: an autonomous government institution whose patrols guard the doors of time and preserve Spain's past. Now, the Ministry's newest recruits: an Army of Flanders soldier from 1956, (Alonso de Entrerríos,) a female college student from 1880 (Amelia Folch) and a modern day SAMUR paramedic (Julián Martínez,) must prevent two Frenchmen in 1808 from altering a war's outcome.
posted by zarq on May 1, 2018 - 16 comments

Movie: Glory

Robert Gould Shaw leads the U.S. Civil War's first all-black volunteer company, fighting prejudices from both his own Union Army, and the Confederates. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Apr 27, 2018 - 2 comments

Movie: Reds

A radical American journalist becomes involved with the Communist revolution in Russia, and hopes to bring its spirit and idealism to the United States. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Apr 22, 2018 - 4 comments

Podcast: Uncivil: The Raid

A group of ex-farmers, a terrorist from Kansas, and a schoolteacher attempt the greatest covert operation of the Civil War.
posted by latkes on Dec 19, 2017 - 4 comments

The Vietnam War: The Weight of Memory (March 1973 - Onward)  Season 1, Ep 10

Civil war continues in Vietnam as President Richard Nixon resigns. After North Vietnamese troops regain control of Saigon and the war ends, people from all sides search for reconciliation. [more inside]
posted by cashman on Oct 14, 2017 - 7 comments

The Vietnam War: A Disrespectful Loyalty (May 1970-March 1973)  Season 1, Ep 9

The South Vietnamese fight on their own, succumbing to terrible losses in Laos. After he is reelected, President Richard Nixon strikes a peace deal with Hanoi that sees the release of American prisoners of war. [more inside]
posted by cashman on Oct 13, 2017 - 0 comments

The Vietnam War: The History of the World (April 1969-May 1970)  Season 1, Ep 8

With morale plummeting in Vietnam, President Nixon begins withdrawing American troops. As news breaks of an unthinkable massacre committed by American soldiers, the public debates the rectitude of the war, while an incursion into Cambodia reignites antiwar protests with tragic consequences at Kent State University.
posted by dnash on Sep 26, 2017 - 4 comments

The Vietnam War: The Veneer of Civilization (June 1968-May 1969)  Season 1, Ep 7

Public support for the war declines, and American men of draft age face difficult decisions and wrenching moral choices. After police battle with demonstrators in the streets of Chicago, Richard Nixon wins the presidency, promising law and order at home and peace overseas. In Vietnam, the war goes on and soldiers on all sides witness terrible savagery and unflinching courage.
posted by homunculus on Sep 25, 2017 - 8 comments

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