Brooklyn Nine-Nine: The Pontiac Bandit Returns
December 7, 2014 6:55 PM - Season 2, Episode 10 - Subscribe

During an unexpectedly combustible undercover-Santa op, Peralta finally nabs the infamous Doug Judy, AKA "The Pontiac Bandit", (returning S01 guest star Craig Robinson) only to discover that Judy has the goods on the Giggle Pig kingpin. Meanwhile, Santiago finds an inconsistency in a long-closed case while making a scrapbook for Capt. Holt, and Boyle and Gina plot to break up their parents after a little bit of gift-exchange recon.

BONUS STUFF: B99 property master Chris Call dishes on the art of prop-wrangling.
posted by Strange Interlude (12 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
Before we get into actual discussion of the episode, I'd just like to take a moment to state that I'd like it if somebody finally got around to making a high profile, big-budget Neuromancer movie, just so Chelsea Peretti could show up in the low-budget parody film a year later and slice packages open with her razor-sharp nails, Molly Millions-style. Make it happen, popular culture!

Anyway, something that B99 is doing really well this year is consciously sequelizing stuff introduced in S01, but still making the sequel eps their own thing. I've never quite been on the same comedic wavelength with Craig Robinson (I'm not that big on Apatow/"Frat Pack"-style comedies), but I find him pretty charming as Doug Judy. I've heard the Pontiac Bandit runner referred to as B99's version of the Greg Pikitis runner on Parks & Rec, but whereas Greg's whole purpose on P&R was to be a shitty little twerp who was simply there to irritate Leslie, I feel like Doug Judy's purpose is to let Jake Peralta know what it's like to be Jake Peralta'ed. And as an added bonus, he also gets Diaz out of her shell a little bit, playing along with his insane crush-fantasy scenarios for the sake of the task force.
posted by Strange Interlude at 7:22 PM on December 7, 2014 [1 favorite]


I love hearing him say 'Doug Judy'. I bet it takes an iron tongue to avoid retakes.
posted by bq at 10:28 PM on December 7, 2014


I love the little touches. The opening is a clear callback to the opening of Lethal Weapon, where Riggs chases a suspect through a Christmas tree lot.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 3:36 AM on December 8, 2014


I've never quite been on the same comedic wavelength with Craig Robinson (I'm not that big on Apatow/"Frat Pack"-style comedies), but I find him pretty charming as Doug Judy.

I used to be pretty bleah on Craig Robinson, but weirdly, the more of him I see, the more I like him. I say "weirdly" because he is always playing the exact same character, which I hated the first time. I feel like he's Stockholm-ed me into loving that persona.
posted by Etrigan at 4:48 AM on December 8, 2014 [2 favorites]


As someone who was a huge fan of Andre Braugher on Homicide, can I just say that I'm finding that his work in comedy to be even better? The man does deadpan better than, well, a dead pan. I suppose next I'll learn that he is an amazing singer or dancer or both?

And Stephanie Beatriz is utterly amazing as Diaz - the body language, the facial expressions, the delivery of the lines.

Craig Robinson as Doug Judy is awesome because he can out-Peralta Peralta. Long may The Pontiac Bandit ride, just because I want to see a guest episode with him every season.

This was one of the best episodes of the season.

Jam it in there, then move it around wildly
posted by nubs at 8:58 AM on December 8, 2014 [4 favorites]


And Stephanie Beatriz is utterly amazing as Diaz - the body language, the facial expressions, the delivery of the lines.

Her slo-mo eyeroll owns.
posted by Etrigan at 9:42 AM on December 8, 2014


Terry Crews just can't stop being awesome.
posted by kmz at 1:49 PM on December 8, 2014


I love this episode so much I can't figure out what to say about it. Every bit was gold.
posted by Holy Zarquon's Singing Fish at 8:07 AM on December 9, 2014


One thing I really loved was the little moment where Santiago clarifies she wasn't being sarcastic, and Holt and Terry both immediately respond with things like, "No one was thinking that, no seriously, duh, we totally know."

I just love that, and it indicates the clear confidence of the cast and crew. For that beat to really work, the characters need to be so fully formed -- Santiago has to deliver the "Yay more work!" like perfectly, and her instant anxiety has to feel natural, and all the characters have to have relationships established well enough that the audience knows that Holt and Terry would both know exactly what she meant. It's not a big joke, but it's the sort of little joke that only works when you've got a really great ensemble.

Man, I love this show.
posted by meese at 8:31 AM on December 9, 2014


The last scene is the same way – Rosa's smile is so genuine, and the "how do people do this with their faces?" punchline is so tossed-off, that it only works as a gag because her character has been so well established that even a happy expression that's not mugging for the camera (and how easy would it have been for her to do the standard twiching forced smile routine) comes off as part of the joke.
posted by Holy Zarquon's Singing Fish at 8:54 AM on December 9, 2014 [3 favorites]


Is anybody else noticing how many gags they've stolen from Corner Gas? The bathroom scale is like the fourth or fifth one.
posted by bleep at 10:22 PM on December 11, 2014


Norm Hiscock worked on both shows. Both shows also have a lot in common in terms of excellent ensemble, great writing, etc.
posted by bleep at 10:23 PM on December 11, 2014


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