Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: 'Til Death Do Us Part   Rewatch 
December 1, 2016 3:43 AM - Season 7, Episode 18 - Subscribe

(Series Finale - Part 2 of 9) Sisko knowingly defies the Prophets, but for a good reason. Kai Winn unknowingly defies the Prophets, but for a HORRIBLE ICKY GROSS REASON EW EW EW.

And will you swear to join with Memory Alpha and stand with it against all who would oppose you?:

- This episode represents the only time that Sarah refers to Sisko as her son. Both director Winrich Kolbe and Ira Behr were delighted with how the scene turned out, especially the image of Sisko resting his head on Sarah's bosom. As Kolbe explains, "It's typical of something you'd see back in the 1920s. It was a very frequent image – the prodigal son comes home and returns to the source of life, the mother." Similarly, Behr enthuses, "I saw it and I went, 'Yeah.' It speaks to the entire seven years of the show, from "Emissary" to that moment. It just gave me chills."

- Some fans felt that the idea that Winn and Dukat embark upon a sexual relationship was a bit over the top, but Brad Thompson explains that that was exactly the point; "The idea of Dukat wooing Winn appealed to us on a very twisted level. Our two bad guys were going to mate! We were howling with glee at the idea!" Ira Behr concurs that the absurdity of the idea was part of the appeal; "The two characters are so worthy of scene after scene after scene. And when we decided that they actually were going to have a physical relationship, it was just dementedly wonderful."

- The character of Solbor was originally supposed to be a minor role with only one line of dialogue, but the producers were so impressed with what James Otis brought to his one small Pah-wraith scene that they decided to increase the part at the last minute.

- Worf's claim that no one who has ever seen what is underneath a Breen's helmet has lived to tell of it seems to contradict the episode "Indiscretion", where Kira and Dukat knock out two Breen guards and take their uniforms, including the helmets.


"What happened to the brave officer I served with? The one who stood at my side as we fought the entire Klingon Empire with a single ship?"
"Those were simpler times."
"Those days might be gone, but the man I served with isn't. He's still within you. Reach in and grab hold of him, Damar. Cardassia needs a leader."
"You were its leader once. You could be again."
"The Pah-wraiths have shown me that I have another destiny. (offering his hand) Good luck old friend."
"And to you."

- Dukat and Damar


"By the power vested in me by the United Federation of Planets, I pronounce you husband and wife."

- Ross, marrying Benjamin Sisko and Kasidy Yates


"You should be honored. You're witnessing an historic moment. The birth of the alliance between the Dominion and the Breen. Changes everything, doesn't it?"

- Weyoun, to Worf and Ezri Dax
posted by CheesesOfBrazil (8 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
So many neat little bits in this episode. anjohl!Dukat arriving on the station that was the scene of his downfall--and the home of his deadliest rival--was chilling. (I imagined him walking past Quark's just as Morn glanced up; Morn does a double take, looks like he's about to say something to Quark... then shakes his head and goes back to his drink.) Conversely, though, his dialogue with Damar was remarkable because it's not only just about the nicest thing he's ever said, but also that there's nothing that he has to gain, directly, from doing so; Dukat always has an ulterior, self-serving motive, especially when he's being (or trying to be) nice, with the possible exception of his relationship with Ziyal. (Maybe that's at play here, if he is trying to keep Damar as his one unburned bridge, but it's not clear that that's his motive.) And even his relationship with Winn is as icky-squicky as that is really only because he's Dukat; aside from that (and how did you like Our American Cousin, Mrs. Lincoln), it's one of the few instances in SFF that come to my mind in which an older woman enjoys a sexual relationship and it's not portrayed as horrifying because she's an older woman.*

Other neat bits: Kira not being OK with Sisko going ahead with the wedding, because Prophets, but stifling it because it's Sisko, and the wedding itself, with its callbacks to "Data's Day" and "Balance of Terror." (Interesting comparisons there; the O'Briens have managed to make their marriage work, despite Annual O'Brien Torture Episode stressors, notably including Keiko being the first Pah-wraith possessee. Tomlinson and Martine on the original Enterprise... well. I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the episode; if you haven't, you should, because it holds up very well.) Ezri quoting dialogue from earlier episodes during her delirium. And, of course, the scene between Sisko and Sarah.

*Lwaxana Troi is another example of this, although her turbo-flirting is usually played for laughs; as I think I've said before, I think that she comes off a bit better on DS9, and in "The Muse", is pretty obviously still sexually active.
posted by Halloween Jack at 10:35 AM on December 1, 2016


where Kira and Dukat knock out two Breen guards and take their uniforms, including the helmets.

Later, Kira will appear in a Breen suit and helmet.

Though if I had to pick someone to have seen what the Breen looked like and lived to tell, Kira is the one.

Kai Winn's pah-Wraith vision would have been a great time to use Bareil again. or Kai Opaka.
posted by the man of twists and turns at 8:46 PM on December 1, 2016


Though if I had to pick someone to have seen what the Breen looked like and lived to tell, Kira is the one.

My headcanon is that the Breen are so boring underneath the helmets—like, they're just regular TNG humans-with-forehead-ridges—that that's WHY they wear the helmets, to hide their shame. And that's also why Kira never bothered to share the experience with anybody.
posted by CheesesOfBrazil at 3:01 AM on December 2, 2016 [2 favorites]


I bet the Breen look like the Beagle Boys from Carl Barks' Disney stories. Just these ridiculous slightly doggish humanoids. They developed both the helmets and their penchant for isolation after they got tired of every other race giggling when they met them.
posted by Halloween Jack at 4:34 AM on December 2, 2016 [1 favorite]


I bet the Breen look like the Beagle Boys from Carl Barks' Disney stories.

Big Time Breen
Burger Breen
Bouncer Breen
Baggy Breen
Babyface Breen
Bankjob Breen
Ma Breen
posted by Servo5678 at 6:36 AM on December 2, 2016 [2 favorites]


I always picture them as Trumpy-type Pod People aliens. If they seemed friendlier I'd rather enjoy the mental image of giant humanoid space huskies.
posted by Fish, fish, are you doing your duty? at 12:08 PM on December 2, 2016 [1 favorite]


They definitely seem to have the nonverbal emoting capacity of Trumpy-type aliens.

Conversely, though, his dialogue with Damar was remarkable because it's not only just about the nicest thing he's ever said, but also that there's nothing that he has to gain, directly, from doing so

I've noted that too. I always read that scene as simply being a representation (rare in genre fiction) of two villains' genuine respect and affection for one another, albeit possibly facilitated by Dukat's recent change of attitude. It's a great character moment for both of them (though, on the topic of Damar, the next episode contains one of his best moments in the series).
posted by CheesesOfBrazil at 11:27 AM on December 3, 2016 [3 favorites]




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